Special Issue "Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test"

A special issue of Audiology Research (ISSN 2039-4349).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Georges Dumas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Grenoble Alpes University Hospital, 38000 Grenoble, France
2. EA 3450 DevAH, Development, Adaptation and Handicap, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lorraine, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
Interests: otoneurology; vestibular tests; skull vibration induced nystagmus test; Menière’s disease
Prof. Dr. Sébastien Schmerber
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Otology, Grenoble Alpes University Hospital, Grenoble, France
Interests: cochlear implants; otoneuro-surgery; otology
Prof. Dr. Philippe P. Perrin
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. EA 3450, Development, Adaptation and Handicap (Director), Faculty of Medicine, University of Lorraine, F-54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
2. Laboratory for the Analysis of Posture, Equilibrium and Motor Function (LAPEM) (Head of Department), University Hospital of Nancy, F-54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
Interests: neurootology; balance control; physiology; vertigo; motion sickness; sports medicine; rehabilitation programs; management of dual-tasking

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Background: The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test is a vestibular test introduced into common clinical practice in 1999, mainly used as a first-line examination. Its clinical value has been underlined and developed by numerous groups in Europe (Hamann, Nuti, Manzari, Modugno, Perez, Batuecas, Zamora, Dumas), Asia (Park, Lee, Hang, Koo, Kim, Ohki) and Australia (Karlberg, Curthoys).

Consensus criteria for the test are currently needed: the characteristics of the vibrators vary, the frequencies used are not always clarified, and the protocols and procedures are variable (results are sometimes provided for one side and sometimes for both sides; the location and duration of the stimulus are variable).

The objective of the current issue is to provide a consensual protocol and common criteria for positivity (to improve reproducibility and establish a corner value for the slow phase velocity, as well as to synthesize the current knowledge about its physiological background) to realize its full value in clinical practice (including the exploration of common UVL pathologies such as VN, MD and V Schwannomas, or less common pathologies, with controls after intratympanic gentamicin, surgery or Cochlear implantation).

We aim to demonstrate its potential in distinguishing central from peripheral patients, determining the side of a lesion or indicating incomplete bilateral areflexia with unilaterally very high frequencies.

A few issues remain regarding the main structures involved in the SVIN response: why do we observe a clear VIN at 100 Hz and not at 500 Hz in UVL patients (vestibular neurectomies and translabyrinthine approaches), since canals respond at 100 Hz and the Otolith structures respond at 100 Hz but still more clearly at 500 Hz? Both these structures are stimulated by vibrations at these frequencies as demonstrated in animal models. This question needs to be addressed and further explored (is there a possible role of converging neurons?).

A special chapter will be dedicated to discussing the value of cervical muscle stimulations over cranial vibrations and their possible clinical consequences.

We thank the authors contributing to this Special Issue, who will share their high levels of expertise in the field.

Dr. Georges Dumas
Prof. Dr. Sébastien Schmerber
Prof. Dr. Philippe P. Perrin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Audiology Research is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Skull vibrations
  • Nystagmus induced by vibrations
  • SVIN criteria of validity
  • Optimal conditions for SVINT
  • SVIN clinical interest
  • SVIN physiological background

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test in a Human Model of Horizontal Canal Plugging
Audiol. Res. 2021, 11(3), 301-312; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11030028 - 24 Jun 2021
Viewed by 772
Abstract
Background/Aim: the aim of this study was to assess the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) results and vestibular residual function after horizontal semicircular canal (HSCC) plugging. Methods: In this retrospective chart review performed in a tertiary referral center, 11 patients who underwent unilateral [...] Read more.
Background/Aim: the aim of this study was to assess the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) results and vestibular residual function after horizontal semicircular canal (HSCC) plugging. Methods: In this retrospective chart review performed in a tertiary referral center, 11 patients who underwent unilateral horizontal semicircular canal plugging (uHSCCP) for disabling Menière’s disease (MD) were included. The skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN) slow-phase velocity (SPV) was compared with the results of the caloric test (CaT), video head impulse test (VHIT), and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) performed on the same day. Results: Overall, 10 patients had a strong SVIN beating toward the intact side (Horizontal SVIN-SPV: 8.8°/s ± 5.6°/s), 10 had a significant or severe ipsilateral CaT hypofunction, 10 had an ipsilateral horizontal VHIT gain impairment, and 3 had altered cVEMP on the operated side. Five had sensorineural hearing worsening. SVIN-positive results were correlated with CaT and horizontal VHIT (HVHIT) results (p < 0.05) but not with cVEMP. SVIN-SPV was correlated with CaT hypofunction in % (p < 0.05). Comparison of pre- and postoperative CaT % hypofunction showed a significant worsening (p = 0.028). Conclusion: SVINT results in a human model of horizontal canal plugging are well correlated with vestibular tests exploring horizontal canal function, but not with cVEMP. SVINT always showed a strong lesional nystagmus beating away from the lesion side. SVIN acts as a good marker of HSCC function. This surgical technique showed invasiveness regarding horizontal canal vestibular function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test)
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Review

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Review
The Neural Basis of Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus (SVIN)
Audiol. Res. 2021, 11(4), 557-566; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11040050 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 241
Abstract
I list a summary of the major clinical observations of SVIN in patients with total unilateral vestibular loss (TUVL) and show how basic results from neurophysiology can explain these clinical observations. The account integrates results from single neuron recordings of identified semicircular canal [...] Read more.
I list a summary of the major clinical observations of SVIN in patients with total unilateral vestibular loss (TUVL) and show how basic results from neurophysiology can explain these clinical observations. The account integrates results from single neuron recordings of identified semicircular canal and otolith afferent neurons in guinea pigs in response to low frequency skull vibration with evidence of the eye movement response in cats to selective semicircular canal stimulation (both individual and combined) and a simple model of nystagmus generation to show how these results explain most of the major characteristics of SVIN. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

[1] Tentative title: Physiological basis of Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus

Authors: Ian S. Curthoys; J . Dlugaiczyck

 

[2] Tentative title: Skull vibration Induced nystagmus as a marker of superior semicircular canal dehiscence

Authors: Nicolas Perez; A. Batuecas

 

[3] Tentative title: Results of Skull Vibration Induced Test in Menière's Disease, Vestibular Migraine and in Not Otherwise Specified episodic vertigo

Author: Teggi Roberto

 

[4] Tentative title: Utility of Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus Test in the follow up of vestibular Neuritis

Authors: Vanesa Pérez Guillén, Enrique García Zamora

 

[5] Tentative title: Is Skull vibration Induced Nystagmus modified with ageing

Author: Giampiero Neri

 

[6] Tentative title: History—A 50 years of Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus Test development

Authors: Solara Sinno et al.

 

[7] Tentative title: Correlation of SVINT with oculo- motor tests and Sensory Organization Test in children with hearing loss

Authors: Solara Sinno et al.

 

[8] Tentative title: Skull vibration induced nystagmus in a human model of Horizontal semi circular canal plugging

Authors: Georges Dumas et al.

 

[9] Tentative title: Correlations of Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test with otolith and canal vestibular tests

Authors: C. Fabre ; Georges Dumas et al.

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