Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Atomic Collision and Atomic Spectroscopy

A special issue of Atoms (ISSN 2218-2004).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6876

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409, USA
Interests: atomic collisions; few-body problem; coherence effects; correlation effects
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon, France
2. Laboratoire Matière en Conditions Extrêmes, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, CEDEX, 91680 Bruyères-le-Châtel, France
Interests: atomic physics; plasma physics; statistical physics; quantum mechanics; QED; collision theory; electron-impact excitation and ionization; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; radiative opacity and equation of state of hot dense matter; astrophysical applications of atomic physics; stellar physics; spectral line shapes; Stark effect; Zeeman effect; angular-momentum theory; group theory; mathematical physics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute for Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, Hungary
Interests: studies of the interactions of highly charged ions with surfaces; investigation of the energy loss of ions in grazing interaction with the capillary walls; investigation of laser-atom; laser-molecule collisions; ion-atom collisions; electron Monte Carlo simulation in solid; charged particle interaction with living cells; interaction of exotic particles with atoms and solid surfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ever since the famous Rutherford experiment, collision studies have made major contributions to advancing our understanding of atomic systems. They ultimately led to the development of the first viable atomic model. After a relatively short time following the advent of quantum mechanics, the structure of most neutral atoms was essentially understood. In spite of these successes, which date back several decades, atomic collision research continues to provide valuable insights into atomic and molecular physics. For example, our understanding of the structure of highly charged ions is still rather incomplete. The spectroscopy of such atomic species is a very active research field which provides, for example, valuable input to astronomy. Studies of interactions of ions or electrons with solids, surfaces, and plasmas proved to be valuable to material science. Finally, atomic collision research addresses one of the most fundamental, and yet unsolved, problems in physics: the few-body problem. Its essence is that the Schrödinger equation is not analytically solvable for more than two mutually interacting particles, even if the underlying forces are precisely known. This Special Issue provides a sample of articles on some of the most significant research activities on these topics in recent years.

Prof. Dr. Michael Schulz
Dr. Jean-Christophe Pain
Prof. Dr. Karoly Tokesi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • few-body problem
  • highly charged ions
  • spectroscopy
  • plasmas
  • material science
  • collision dynamics
  • charged particle interactions with matter

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 881 KiB  
Article
Differential Studies of Argon Particle and Antiparticle Interactions: Present Status and Future Possibilities
by Robert D. DuBois and Károly Tőkési
Atoms 2023, 11(12), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms11120151 - 1 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1202
Abstract
Although the comparison of fully differential ionization data for particle and antiparticle impact provides the ultimate tests of theoretical models, only very low antiparticle beam intensities are available. Hence, few experiments of this type have been performed. Therefore, available experimentally obtained single and [...] Read more.
Although the comparison of fully differential ionization data for particle and antiparticle impact provides the ultimate tests of theoretical models, only very low antiparticle beam intensities are available. Hence, few experiments of this type have been performed. Therefore, available experimentally obtained single and double differential cross-sections, which are much easier to obtain, are compared in order to demonstrate differences when only the projectile mass or charge (+1 or −1) is changed. Included in the comparison are cross-sections calculated for positron and electron impact using a three-particle classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The calculated cross-sections provide independent information about the ejected electron and the scattered projectile contributions, plus information about the impact parameters, all as functions of the collision kinematics. From these comparisons, suggestions as to where future investigations are both feasible and useful are provided. Full article
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14 pages, 4850 KiB  
Article
The Vortex Surface in a Three-Body Quantum System
by Tamara A. Guarda, Francisco Navarrete and Raúl O. Barrachina
Atoms 2023, 11(11), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms11110147 - 15 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Vortices are structures known in our daily lives and observed in a wide variety of systems, from cosmic to microscopic scales. Relatively recent studies showed that vortices could also appear in simple quantum systems. For instance, they were observed experimentally and theoretically as [...] Read more.
Vortices are structures known in our daily lives and observed in a wide variety of systems, from cosmic to microscopic scales. Relatively recent studies showed that vortices could also appear in simple quantum systems. For instance, they were observed experimentally and theoretically as isolated zeros in the differential cross section in atomic ionization processes by the impact of charged particles. In this work, we show that the appearance of these quantum vortices as point structures was not due to any intrinsic property of them, but to the use of restrictive geometries in their visualization. In particular, we show that by studying the fully differential cross section for hydrogen ionization by positron impact, these vortex points are actually a manifestation of a more complex and hitherto unexplored structure, a 3D “vortex surface”. Full article
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21 pages, 590 KiB  
Article
Calculation of Energy and Angular Distributions of Electrons Produced in Intermediate-Energy p + H2 Collisions
by Corey T. Plowman, Kade H. Spicer and Alisher S. Kadyrov
Atoms 2023, 11(8), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms11080112 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1061
Abstract
We extend the two-centre wave-packet convergent close-coupling approach to doubly differential ionisation in proton collisions with H2 to intermediate projectile energies. The results for the doubly differential cross section at projectile energies from 48 to 200 keV are presented as a function [...] Read more.
We extend the two-centre wave-packet convergent close-coupling approach to doubly differential ionisation in proton collisions with H2 to intermediate projectile energies. The results for the doubly differential cross section at projectile energies from 48 to 200 keV are presented as a function of the energy and angle of emitted electrons. We consider a wide range of emission angles from 10 to 160, and compare our results to experimental data, where available. Excellent agreement between the presented results and the experimental data was found, especially for emission angles less than 130. For very large backward emission angles our calculations tended to slightly overestimate the experimental data when energetic electrons are ejected and the doubly differential cross section is very small. This discrepancy may be due to the large uncertainties in the experimental data in this region and the model target description. Overall, the present results show significant improvement upon currently available theoretical results and provide a consistently accurate description of this process across a wide range of incident energies. Full article
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Review

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27 pages, 5680 KiB  
Review
Collisional Classical Dynamics at the Quantum Scale
by Sebastian Otranto
Atoms 2023, 11(11), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms11110144 - 9 Nov 2023
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Abstract
During the past five decades, classical dynamics have been systematically used to gain insight on collision processes between charged particles and photons with atomic and molecular targets. These methods have proved to be efficient for systems in which numerical intensive quantum mechanical methods [...] Read more.
During the past five decades, classical dynamics have been systematically used to gain insight on collision processes between charged particles and photons with atomic and molecular targets. These methods have proved to be efficient for systems in which numerical intensive quantum mechanical methods are not yet tractable. During the years, reaction cross sections for charge exchange and ionization have been scrutinized at the total and differential levels, leading to a clear understanding of the benefits and limitations inherent in a classical description. In this work, we present a review of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method, its current status and the perspectives that can be envisaged for the near future. Full article
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Other

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17 pages, 371 KiB  
Viewpoint
EUV Beam–Foil Spectra of Germanium and a Blind-Spot Problem in Spectroscopy
by Elmar Träbert
Atoms 2023, 11(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms11030045 - 2 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1275
Abstract
Beam–foil extreme-ultraviolet survey spectra of Ge (Z=32) are presented. The data have been garnered at the performance limit of the heavy-ion accelerator available, with a correspondingly limited statistical and calibrational reliability. However, the Ge spectra have been recorded at [...] Read more.
Beam–foil extreme-ultraviolet survey spectra of Ge (Z=32) are presented. The data have been garnered at the performance limit of the heavy-ion accelerator available, with a correspondingly limited statistical and calibrational reliability. However, the Ge spectra have been recorded at various delays after excitation, and this technique points to a possible blind spot in some other spectroscopic techniques, and thus in the literature coverage. A similarly patchy coverage can be noted in various atomic structure computations. The experimental and theoretical gaps seem to be correlated. Full article
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