Special Issue "Fire Meteorology: Observations and Modeling from Micro- to Meso- Scale"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2022) | Viewed by 4049

Special Issue Editors

Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh), 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: pyro-meteorology; coupled atmosphere-fire models; numerical weather prediction; extreme weather events; convective-permitting climate models; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: synoptic and dynamic meteorology; numerical weather prediction; operational weather forecasting; land/sea–air interaction; extreme weather events; pyro-meteorology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: dynamic meteorology; cloud physics; weather modification; extreme weather events; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wildland fires include complex physical processes across different spatial and temporal scales. At the microscale, the inertia due to wind flow compensates the induced buoyancy from the pressure gradient between the fire plume and the ambient air; meanwhile, at the mesoscale, flow oscillations can contribute to extreme fire behavior. The short-term variation of weather conditions affects the local fire behavior, while their seasonal and inter-annual variations affect fuel production and flammability over large areas. The geometry and burning characteristics of the fuel bed, the properties of the atmosphere in the vicinity of the fire, and the local topography define the environment in which a wildland fire can interact with. Over the last decades, the measurement, observation, and modeling of wildland fires have been incorporated into the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry involved in the behavior of wildland fires. Today, the advances in remote sensing, geographical information systems, and computational resources are revealing new horizons in this topic. The purpose of this Special Issue is to present innovative studies covering all aspects of fire meteorology, including:

  1. Flow dynamics across different spatial scales during a wildland fire;
  2. Prevailing weather conditions and in situ measurements during high-impact wildland fire events;
  3. Advances in fire observation techniques and fire modeling.

Dr. Stergios Kartsios
Dr. Ioannis Pytharoulis
Prof. Dr. Theodore Karacostas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fire weather
  • atmosphere–fire interactions
  • extreme fire events
  • coupled atmosphere–fire models
  • fire observations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Modelling the Atmospheric Environment Associated with a Wind-Driven Fire Event in Portugal
Atmosphere 2022, 13(7), 1124; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13071124 - 15 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1047
Abstract
Increased knowledge of the meteorological conditions that lead to mega-fires is important to prevent wildfires and improve firefighting. This study analyses the atmospheric conditions that led to the largest forest fire ever observed in Portugal in 2019. The fire burned an estimated total [...] Read more.
Increased knowledge of the meteorological conditions that lead to mega-fires is important to prevent wildfires and improve firefighting. This study analyses the atmospheric conditions that led to the largest forest fire ever observed in Portugal in 2019. The fire burned an estimated total area of around 9000 hectares in 12 h. The study is based on two simulations performed with the Meso-NH atmospheric model. The control simulation was configured in a single and large domain with 2500 m resolution, whereas a second simulation was configured using the grid nesting technique with an inner domain with 500 m resolution. The fire developed under typical summer conditions, under the influence of the Azores anticyclone and the presence of the Iberian thermal low. The weather pattern included intense northwest winds in the western region of the Iberian Peninsula. In the fire area, the wind speed was around 7 m s−1 with maximum wind gusts of 15 m s−1, favouring the rapid spread of the fire and characterising the event as a wind-driven fire. This study demonstrates the benefits of the use of large domains and high-resolution numerical simulations to explore the regional and local effects, which are crucial for the evolution of some fires. Full article
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Article
Meteorological Analysis of the 2021 Extreme Wildfires in Greece: Lessons Learned and Implications for Early Warning of the Potential for Pyroconvection
Atmosphere 2022, 13(3), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13030475 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2297
Abstract
The 2021 fire season in Greece was the worst of the past 13 years, resulting in more than 130,000 ha of burnt area, with about 70% consumed by five wildfires that ignited and spread in early August. Common to these wildfires was the [...] Read more.
The 2021 fire season in Greece was the worst of the past 13 years, resulting in more than 130,000 ha of burnt area, with about 70% consumed by five wildfires that ignited and spread in early August. Common to these wildfires was the occurrence of violent pyroconvection. This work presents a meteorological analysis of this outbreak of extreme pyroconvective wildfires. Our analysis shows that dry and warm antecedent weather preconditioned fuels in the fire-affected areas, creating a fire environment that alone could effectively support intense wildfire activity. Analysis of surface conditions revealed that the ignition and the most active spread of all wildfires coincided with the most adverse fire weather since the beginning of the fire season. Further, the atmospheric environment was conducive to violent pyroconvection, as atmospheric instability gradually increased amid the breakdown of an upper-air ridge ahead of an approaching long-wave trough. In summary, we highlight that the severity and extent of the 2021 Greek wildfires were not surprising considering the fire weather potential for the period when they ignited. Continuous monitoring of the large- and local-scale conditions that promote extreme fire behavior is imperative for improving Greece’s capacity for managing extreme wildfires. Full article
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