Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics IV

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 4558

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, 634055 Tomsk, Russia
Interests: lidar sounding; atmosphere; gas analysis; ozone; remote spectroscopy
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Guest Editor
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, 634055 Tomsk, Russia
Interests: laser sensing; wind lidar; aerosol physcs
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Guest Editor
Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS, Moscow 119017, Russia
Interests: atmospheric boundary layer; free atmosphere; turbulence; vortex motions and structures; air–sea interaction; pollution transport; internal gravity waves; acoustic nonlinear effects

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Guest Editor
Shirshov Institute of Oceanology RAS, 117997 Moscow, Russia
Interests: Arctic; marine aerosols; black carbon; long-range atmospheric transport; aeolian sedimentation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect current novel papers, presented at the 28th International Conference “Atmospheric and Ocean Optics. Atmospheric Physics” (AOO—2022), 4–8 July 2022, Tomsk, https://symp.iao.ru/en/aoo/28/i1. We invite researchers to contribute original research papers dealing with all aspects of atmospheric and ocean optics and atmospheric physics. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Molecular spectroscopy of atmospheric gases;
  • Radiative regime and climate problems;
  • Models and databases for the problems of atmospheric optics and physics;
  • Optical radiation propagation in the atmosphere and ocean;
  • Wave propagation in random inhomogeneous media;
  • Nonlinear effects at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and water media;
  • Laser and acoustic sounding of atmosphere and ocean;
  • Bio-optic characteristics of sea water;
  • Instruments for measuring hydro-optic characteristics and properties of suspension;
  • Underwater light fields;
  • Remote sensing, including lidars and color satellite scanners;
  • Regional bio-optic algorithms;
  • Validation of ocean remote sensing data from space;
  • Monitoring of variability in sea water bio-optics under the influence of climate and anthropogenic impacts;
  • Optical properties of polar sea waters;
  • Physics of the troposphere;
  • Structure and dynamics of the lower and middle atmosphere;
  • Dynamics of the atmosphere and climate of the Asian region;
  • Physics of the upper atmosphere;
  • Climatological studies of the upper atmosphere using GNSS;
  • The relationship processes in the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere;
  • Long-range atmospheric transport of particulate matter;
  • Black carbon in the atmosphere in the Arctic and Subarctic.

Dr. Oleg Romanovskii
Dr. Gennadii Matvienko
Dr. Otto Chkhetiani
Dr. Vladimir P. Shevchenko
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • molecular spectroscopy
  • atmospheric radiative processes
  • optical radiation propagation
  • nonlinear effects in atmosphere
  • laser sounding
  • physics of the troposphere
  • climatological studies
  • physics of the upper atmosphere
  • bio-optic characteristics of sea water
  • instruments for measuring hydro-optic characteristics
  • optical properties of polar sea waters
  • black carbon
  • marine aerosols
  • long-range transport
  • atmospheric boundary layer
  • free atmosphere
  • vortex motions and structures
  • air-sea interaction
  • pollution transport
  • internal gravity waves

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 3120 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Spatial Structure of Black Carbon Concentrations in the Near-Surface Arctic Atmosphere
by Ekaterina S. Nagovitsyna, Vassily A. Poddubny, Alexander A. Karasev, Dmitry M. Kabanov, Olga R. Sidorova and Alexander S. Maslovsky
Atmosphere 2023, 14(1), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14010139 - 8 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1537
Abstract
The results of the research are numerical estimates of the average fields of black carbon mass concentration in the surface layer of the atmosphere of the Arctic region obtained using the numeric technology referred to as fluid location of the atmosphere (FLA). The [...] Read more.
The results of the research are numerical estimates of the average fields of black carbon mass concentration in the surface layer of the atmosphere of the Arctic region obtained using the numeric technology referred to as fluid location of the atmosphere (FLA). The modelling has been based on measurements of the black carbon concentrations in the near-surface atmosphere obtained during the two cruises of the Professor Multanovskiy (28 July–7 September 2019) and Akademik Mstislav Keldysh (31 July–24 August 2020) research vessels. These measurements have been supplemented by measurements at stationary monitoring points located on the Spitsbergen and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelagoes. The simulation in the summertime demonstrates that areas of increased black carbon concentrations were observed over Northern Europe and, in 2019, also over the Laptev Sea basin. The obtained spatial distribution of mass concentrations of black carbon qualitatively agreed with the same data derived from the second Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) but showed quantitative differences. The average values of mass concentrations of black carbon in the modelling zones are as follows: 85.3 ng/m3 (2019) and 53.6 ng/m3 (2020) for fields reconstructed by the FLA technology; and 261.69 ng/m3 (2019) and 131.8 ng/m3 (2020) for the MERRA-2 data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics IV)
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16 pages, 22671 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Cloud Adjacency Effect on Retrieval of the Ground Surface Reflectance from MODIS Satellite Data for the Baikal Region
by Mikhail V. Tarasenkov, Marina V. Engel, Matvei N. Zonov and Vladimir V. Belov
Atmosphere 2022, 13(12), 2054; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13122054 - 7 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1052
Abstract
The cloud adjacency effect on surface reflectance retrievals for the region of the Russian Federation with coordinates 51–54 N, 103–109 E including the southern part of Lake Baikal for the period of 1–23 July 2021 is assessed in [...] Read more.
The cloud adjacency effect on surface reflectance retrievals for the region of the Russian Federation with coordinates 51–54 N, 103–109 E including the southern part of Lake Baikal for the period of 1–23 July 2021 is assessed in this paper. The method is based on the computer program for statistical simulation of radiative transfer in the atmosphere with the stochastic cloud field including a deterministic gap of a given radius. The results of this program are then used in the interpolation formula. Masks of cloudless pixels, for which the cloud adjacency effect (CAE) changes the ground surface reflectance by more than 0.005, are constructed. The analysis of the resulting CAE radii shows that the average radius is 13.7 km for MODIS band 8, 11.2 km for band 3, 8.4 km for band 4, 7.2 km for band 1, and 7 km for band 2. For the considered MODIS images and bands, the pixels with strong CAE make up from 2.8 to 100% of the total number of cloudless pixels. The correlation coefficients between the initial data and the CAE radius suggest that the cloud optical depth, cloud cover index, and ground surface reflectance exert the major influence on the considered images. A simplified approximation equation for the CAE radius as a function of the cloud optical depth, cloud cover index, and surface reflectance is derived. The analysis of the approximation shows that for the considered images, the CAE radius decreases nearly linearly with wavelength for low reflective surfaces. However, for high reflective surfaces, its wavelength dependence is nonlinear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics IV)
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15 pages, 4411 KiB  
Article
Calibration by Air in Polarization Sensing
by Sergei N. Volkov, Ignatii V. Samokhvalov and Duk-Hyeon Kim
Atmosphere 2022, 13(8), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13081225 - 2 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1151
Abstract
Scattered light polarization serves as an indicator and a characteristic of various processes in the atmosphere. The polarization measurements of all scattering matrix elements provide an adequate description of the optical and morphological parameters and orientation of particles in clouds. In this article, [...] Read more.
Scattered light polarization serves as an indicator and a characteristic of various processes in the atmosphere. The polarization measurements of all scattering matrix elements provide an adequate description of the optical and morphological parameters and orientation of particles in clouds. In this article, we consider the problem of the calibration of matrix polarization lidar (MPL) parameters. Calibration by air is an effective alternative to the technique for correcting optical element parameters and among the calibration parameters of the MPL optical path are the relative transmission coefficient of a two-channel receiver, the angular positions of the transmission axes of the optical elements of the transmitter and receiver units, including the polarizers and wave plates, and the retardance of wave plates. For the first time, the method of calibration by air was partially implemented in the MPL to study Asian dust in the atmosphere. We considered the calibration problem more generally and this was due to the need to calibrate different MPL modifications from stationary to mobile ones. The calibration equations have been derived in terms of instrumental vectors, and the method of their solution by the generalized least squares method has been proposed. The method has been verified on a numerical MPL model and validated using MPL measurements in Daejeon, Republic of Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics IV)
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