Cool Cities: Towards Sustainable and Healthy Urban Environments (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 February 2023) | Viewed by 2541

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yong-in 17104, Republic of Korea
Interests: building physics; thermal comfort; building performance modeling; urban heat islands; indoor environments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Republic of Korea
Interests: urban heat islands; energy and environment; adaptive comfort; occupant behavior
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Building Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Korea
Interests: building environment and control; thermal comfort; energy efficiency; artificial intelligence; air quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban overheating due to heat waves and urban heat island (UHI) effects associated with climate change and urbanization has various adverse effects on (I) urban dwellers (e.g., increased heat stress, heat-related illnesses and mortality); (II) the urban building stock (e.g., increased space cooling energy consumption during the summertime); (III) the overall urban climate (e.g., synergies with atmospheric pollution in urban areas); and (IV) urban economic growth (e.g., reduced work productivity, increased healthcare and associated economic losses). The ongoing urbanization seen in many parts of the world is likely to further exacerbate the aforementioned effects of urban overheating, further deteriorating the quality of life in urban areas. Moreover, urban overheating is relevant to the specific characteristics (e.g., topography, synoptic and mesoscale circulations, land use patterns) of a given locality, making the “one size fits all” approach to tackling heat issues nearly impossible. Consequently, comprehensive and interdisciplinary research attempting to understand urban heat challenges, which are somewhat complex and multi-faceted, is essential for designing sustainable and salutogenic cities. This Special Issue is a follow-up of the first Special Issue entitled “Cool Cities: Towards Sustainable and Healthy Urban Environments” (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere/special_issues/cool_cities) published in Atmosphere in 2022. To that end, for this Special Issue we invite papers on the following themes:

  • Assessment of urban heat and its evolution;
  • Advanced scientific modelling of urban heat;
  • Interactions between UHI and urban atmospheric pollution;
  • Impact of urban overheating on mortality and morbidity;
  • Impact of extreme heat on local/global energy use;
  • Impact of extreme heat on economic growth;
  • Progress of urban heat adaptation and mitigation strategies;
  • Heat-related awareness, knowledge, management and policies.

We are interested in a broad range of urban-heat-related studies from various parts of the world in order to shine more light on the peculiarity and seriousness of urban-heat-related issues and hopefully help enrich the ongoing scientific discourse on the urban livability agenda and science-driven urban design policies/practices.

Dr. Jack Ngarambe
Prof. Dr. Geun Young Yun
Prof. Dr. Jin Woo Moon
Prof. Dr. Baojie He
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • key drivers of urban overheating
  • local climates and building energy use
  • urban heat island and urban pollution
  • machine-learning-based UHI modelling
  • urban heat island and ongoing urbanization
  • heat adaptation and mitigation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 2574 KiB  
Article
Climate Variability and Trends in Imotski, Croatia: An Analysis of Temperature and Precipitation
by Adrijana Vrsalović, Ivo Andrić, Ognjen Bonacci and Omer Kovčić
Atmosphere 2023, 14(5), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14050861 - 11 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1904
Abstract
This paper examines the long-term changes in temperature and precipitation in the karst region of Imotski, Croatia, which is of particular interest due to its abundance of karst phenomena. This study analyses temperatures and precipitation on monthly and annual scales at two climatological [...] Read more.
This paper examines the long-term changes in temperature and precipitation in the karst region of Imotski, Croatia, which is of particular interest due to its abundance of karst phenomena. This study analyses temperatures and precipitation on monthly and annual scales at two climatological stations in the region, Imotski and Ričice. Linear regression, the Theil–Sen estimator (β), and the Mann–Kendall test were used to determine the trends and statistical significance. The homogeneity of the data was checked using the Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT), and the F-test and t-test were used to test the significance of the mean shift between the two subseries. Additionally, the coefficient of variability, standardized rainfall anomaly, and precipitation concentration index were employed to analyze the precipitation variability. The study found a statistically significant (p < 0.05) upward trend in the mean (β = 0.0437) and maximum (β = 0.0590) annual air temperature at the Imotski station and the mean (β = 0.0387) annual temperature at the Ričice station. The SNHT test showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) shift in the mean annual temperatures after 2007 and maximum annual temperatures after 1998 at the Imotski station. Similarly, a statistically significant (p < 0.05) shift in the mean annual temperatures after 2011 and the maximum annual temperatures after 1998 was found at the Ričice station. A seasonal distribution of precipitation is observed at both the Ričice and Imotski stations, with a downward trend (β = −2.7693) at Ričice and an upward trend (β = 6.0575) at Imotski; however, neither trend is statistically significant (p > 0.05). An increase in the intensity of dry periods and the occurrence of extreme events was also noted. The climatological analysis, conducted for the first time in this area, is a crucial step toward understanding local climate patterns and making informed decisions toward sustainable development and adaptation strategies. Full article
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