Special Issue "Application of Advanced Lighting Systems in Buildings"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Geun Young Yun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 1732, Korea
Interests: occupant behaviour and comfort; building energy and environmental performance; performance prediction and control; iot based building control; deep learning for buildings; urban heat islands; climate change; architectural lighting; renewable energy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lighting is an indispensable element in the successful design and operation of buildings. Lighting defines the overall atmosphere of architectural spaces, and well-lit spaces are a prerequisite to maintain the comfort, well-being, and health of building occupants. The design and control of lighting in buildings poses a large challenge, because lighting is the biggest single consumer of electricity in commercial buildings. Globally, the lighting energy consumption accounts for 20% of total electricity use in office buildings. In order to address these challenges, there have been efforts to develop energy-efficient lighting without sacrificing human comfort and health. One solution is the use of advanced lighting controls, which utilize vacancy sensing, daylight harvesting, task-ambient lighting, etc. Another is the development of innovative light sources such as solid-state lighting. The advent of new lighting technologies allows for the precise and efficient control of lighting but also requires research efforts to understand and examine their visual and physiological effects. It is of particular importance to remove potential light-related risks including glare, depression, reduced productivity, and circadian disorders.   

Thus, this Special Issue aims to provide a platform for wide-range professions to understand and discuss the major challenges and new possibilities in the use of advanced lighting systems in the design and control of buildings. This Special Issue is open to the submission of original research articles as well as critical reviews.

Prof. Dr. Geun Young Yun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • visual and non-visual effects of lighting 
  • development of advanced lighting
  • modelling and simulation of lighting
  • advanced control of lighting 
  • daylight harvesting in buildings 
  • design and optimization of daylighting and electrical lighting 
  • performance of lighting 
  • energy and lighting in buildings 
  • occupant factors in the design and operation of lighting

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Assessment of Commercial Building Lighting as a Frequency Regulation Resource
Energies 2020, 13(3), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030613 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
This paper evaluates the potential for automated lighting control as a resource for frequency regulation of the electric grid system in the context of current energy policies, economic incentives, and technological trends. The growing prevalence of renewable energy has increased the need for [...] Read more.
This paper evaluates the potential for automated lighting control as a resource for frequency regulation of the electric grid system in the context of current energy policies, economic incentives, and technological trends. The growing prevalence of renewable energy has increased the need for ancillary services to maintain grid frequency and stability. While demand side resources like heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems, as well as water treatment plants are already evaluated as regulation service providers, the potential application to electrical lighting systems has largely been ignored. Yet, aggregations of lighting systems that are retrofitted with intelligent controls could conceivably contribute to frequency regulation services with little impact on user comfort. To further explore the feasibility of lighting potential, this paper explores (1) how lighting control systems are limited by visual comfort perception and acceptability, (2) how such limitations impact the performance of the lighting system as an frequency regulation resource, and (3) how the market potential of lighting systems as demand side resources compares in different regional transmission organizations. Finally, the impact of developing technologies on the application of lighting systems for frequency regulation is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Advanced Lighting Systems in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Study on Daylighting Optimization in the Exhibition Halls of Museums for Chinese Calligraphy and Painting Works
Energies 2020, 13(1), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010240 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
With respect to the light environment of the exhibition halls for Chinese calligraphy and painting works in the museums, the daylighting design in these display spaces have been studied, the key design factors, such as daylighting pattern, and arrangement of exhibits are examined [...] Read more.
With respect to the light environment of the exhibition halls for Chinese calligraphy and painting works in the museums, the daylighting design in these display spaces have been studied, the key design factors, such as daylighting pattern, and arrangement of exhibits are examined and explored by field trips. Then, the display spaces are divided into diverse categories whose sky light environments are predicted by the demands of exhibits. Under changed daylighting situations, the daylight parameters, i.e., daylight factor (DF) and DF uniformity, discomfort glare index (DGI) and luminance distribution are calculated. Thus, the proper daylighting pattern and elements in the exhibition halls will be decided. The optimization strategies that optimize the parameters of daylighting patterns and elements are presented. The studies have shown that the daylighting quality will improved by the implement of optimal design, and good luminance environment in the calligraphy and painting exhibition halls are obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Advanced Lighting Systems in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
High-Performance Accuracy of Daylight-Responsive Dimming Systems with Illuminance by Distant Luminaires for Energy-Saving Buildings
Energies 2019, 12(4), 731; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12040731 - 22 Feb 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
In a conventional daylight-responsive dimming system (DRDS), all the luminaires are turned off during the calibration process except for the luminaire under consideration in order to sense only the workplane illuminance of that luminaire. However, the workplane illuminance of the luminaire is influenced [...] Read more.
In a conventional daylight-responsive dimming system (DRDS), all the luminaires are turned off during the calibration process except for the luminaire under consideration in order to sense only the workplane illuminance of that luminaire. However, the workplane illuminance of the luminaire is influenced by other luminaires. Therefore, the final workplane illuminance of the actual operated system is higher than the target workplane illuminance, reducing the energy-saving efficiency of the DRDS. Herein, to improve the conventional DRDS, an advanced commissioning prediction method of daylight illuminance, and a dimming control algorithm considering the influences by distant luminaires are proposed. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed prediction method of daylight illuminance, the daylight illuminance on the workplane and the photo sensor values of six points were measured in a full-scale mockup for 27 consecutive days from 22 June to 18 July 2018. As a result of root-mean-square error (RMSE) analysis of daylight illuminance and the photo sensor values, the RMSE (64.86) of P3 located in the middle of the room was the highest, and the RMSE value (17.60) of P5 located near the window was the lowest. In addition, the power consumption of the luminaires, and the target illuminance accuracy of the proposed DRDS were measured and analyzed for 32 consecutive days from 19 July to 19 August 2018 in a full-scale mockup. The average target illuminance accuracy was 96.9% (SD 2.2%), the average lighting energy-savings ratio was 78.4%, and the daylight illuminance prediction accuracy was 95.5% (SD 3.4%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Advanced Lighting Systems in Buildings)
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