Topical Collection "State-of-the-Art Dentistry and Oral Health"

A topical collection in Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This collection belongs to the section "Applied Dentistry and Oral Sciences".

Editors

Prof. Dr. Joseph Nissan
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Oral Rehabilitation, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
Interests: fixed prosthodontics; implant dentistry; aesthetic dentistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Shlomo Matalon
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, P.o. Box 6139001, Israel
Interests: oral microbiology; restorative dentistry
Prof. Dr. Gavriel Chaushu
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Departments of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 61000, Israel
Interests: oral surgery; minimally invasive surgery; postoperative morbidity; dental implants; bone substitutes; block graft; bone graft
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carlos E. Nemcovsky
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Periodontology and Dental Implantology, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
Interests: soft and hard tissue reconstruction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Eyal Rosen
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interests: biofilm; bacterial resistance; persistent infection; bacterial colonization

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dentistry and oral health developments are continuously ameliorating the level of dental practice. Recent advances in digitalization and computerization are likely to redefine most manufacturing processes and treatment approaches in their effectiveness and attractiveness. Evidence-based data provide us with the necessary information to refine clinical practice in dentistry, oral health, and quality of life. However, a considerable research effort is still required to achieve these methods with unique   skills and the ability to cooperate, study, and adjust to continuously evolving conditions and tasks.

The present Special Issue will focus on breakthrough valuable research in dentistry and allied disciplines to provide evidence-based information that will contribute to improve dental treatments and oral health.

Prof. Joseph Nissan
Prof. Shlomo Matalon
Prof. Gabi Chaushu
Prof. Carlos E. Nemcovsky
Dr. Eyal Rosen
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral rehabilitation and dental implants
  • periodontics and oral surgery
  • pedodontics and orthodontics
  • endodontics and microbiology
  • oral pathology—medicine and oral biology
  • dental materials and nanotechnology

Published Papers (5 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021

Article
Long-Term Prosthetic Aftercare of Mandibular Implant-Supported Overdenture
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(17), 8673; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178673 - 29 Aug 2022
Viewed by 365
Abstract
Background: Two of the most popular resilient attachment systems for mandibular implant-supported overdenture (MISOD) are locator and ball attachments. The purpose of the present retrospective cohort study was to assess the long-term prosthetic aftercare and oral hygiene status in edentulous patients rehabilitated with [...] Read more.
Background: Two of the most popular resilient attachment systems for mandibular implant-supported overdenture (MISOD) are locator and ball attachments. The purpose of the present retrospective cohort study was to assess the long-term prosthetic aftercare and oral hygiene status in edentulous patients rehabilitated with MISOD. Materials and Methods: Forty-five consecutive patients were included (22, group A- ball vs. 23, group B- locator attachments). Attachment incorporation into the MISOD was conducted in a direct (chair-side) intraoral technique at the time of denture insertion. Routine follow-up included yearly visits. The number of visits requiring prosthetic aftercare, either during the follow-up or during the additional visit, was recorded. Outcome parameters included—prosthetic aftercare—the number of aftercare (primary outcome parameter) visits, and dental treatment received (pressure sores relief, liner changes due to loss of retention, loss of retention due to debris accumulation, denture repair—secondary outcome parameters); oral hygiene—gingival index (primary outcome parameter). Results: The mean follow-up of the entire study population was 84 ± 21 months, range 39–120 months. Statistical analysis revealed a lower need for prosthetic aftercare interventions in group A (p < 0.001). The mean number of visits dedicated to pressure sores relief (6.09 ± 1.04 vs. 3.03 ± 0.77, p < 0.001) and liner exchange due to loss of retention (5.6 ± 1.03 vs. 2.09 ± 1.04, p < 0.001), were significantly lower in group A. Debris (food/calculus) accumulation inside the attachment was noted only for the locator’s group (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences between the groups were noted for denture repair (p = 0.318). Oral hygiene also exhibited statistically significant differences in favor of group A (2.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.03 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). Conclusions: It can be concluded that using ball attachments for MISOD yields less need for aftercare treatments and improved oral hygiene status over the years. Full article
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Article
Pre-Disinfection of Poly-Methyl-Methacrylate (PMMA) Reduces Volatile Sulfides Compounds (VSC) Production in Experimental Biofilm In Vitro
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 1947; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12041947 - 13 Feb 2022
Viewed by 502
Abstract
Temporary dental crowns and bridges are commonly made of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA), a porous material attracting the microbial biofilm associated with malodor production. The purpose of the present study was to test pre-disinfection of PMMA on malodor-related parameters in an experimental oral biofilm. PMMA [...] Read more.
Temporary dental crowns and bridges are commonly made of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA), a porous material attracting the microbial biofilm associated with malodor production. The purpose of the present study was to test pre-disinfection of PMMA on malodor-related parameters in an experimental oral biofilm. PMMA discs were pre-soaked in anti-malodor disinfecting solutions and controls: (i) Saline, (ii) essential oils (EO), (iii) herbal extracts (HE), and (iv) chlorhexidine (CHX). Following, discs were subjected to a salivary incubation assay and monitored for malodor-producing bacteria within the biofilm using confocal microscopy (CLSM), malodor production (organoleptic scale 0–5), volatile sulfide levels (Halimeter), and salivary protein degradation (SDS-PAGE). Results showed that disinfection solutions were significantly effective in reducing malodor-related parameters (CHX > HE > EO > Saline). Taken together, these results suggest that pre-disinfection may help to reduce malodor production in PMMA temporary dental restorations. Full article
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2021

Jump to: 2022

Article
The Influence of Three Different Digital Cement Spacers on the Marginal Gap Adaptation of Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Silicate Crowns Fabricated by CAD-CAM System
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(22), 10709; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210709 - 12 Nov 2021
Viewed by 564
Abstract
Background: This study compared the influence of three different radial spacers (60,90,120 microns) on the marginal gap adaptation by using computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) for producing monolithic zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic crowns. Methods: A total of 45 abutment acrylic teeth were divided [...] Read more.
Background: This study compared the influence of three different radial spacers (60,90,120 microns) on the marginal gap adaptation by using computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) for producing monolithic zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic crowns. Methods: A total of 45 abutment acrylic teeth were divided into three groups of different radial spacers (60, 90, and 120 microns). In each group 15 teeth were scanned by Omnicam intra oral scanner and ZLS crowns were ground. For each unit the marginal gap was evaluated at four regions of interest by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). To compare the marginal gap between the three groups a one-way ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni test was preformed (α = 0.05). Results: The marginal gap for a 60 microns (162.99 ± 16.25 µm) radial spacer was found significantly higher than 90 (41.85 ± 3.57 µm) and 120 (41.85 ± 5.3 µm) microns radial spacers (p < 0.05). Between 90- and 120-micron radial spacers no difference was obtained. (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A radial spacer of 60 microns showed a significantly higher marginal gap compared to 90 and 120 microns and was not clinically accepted (>120 microns). For both 90 and 120 microns the marginal gap was clinically accepted (<120 microns) with no difference between the groups. The radial spacer which should be optimum for CELTRA® DUO crowns is 90 microns. Full article
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Article
New Training Approach for Improving the Spatial Perception and Orientation Ability of Dentistry Students
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(20), 9387; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11209387 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 594
Abstract
Introduction: During a basic prosthetics course, dental students train on plastic teeth for fixed partial dentures (FPD). The complexity of manual skill acquisition and the need for extra training led us to develop a portable tool for home training (PhantHome). The aim of [...] Read more.
Introduction: During a basic prosthetics course, dental students train on plastic teeth for fixed partial dentures (FPD). The complexity of manual skill acquisition and the need for extra training led us to develop a portable tool for home training (PhantHome). The aim of the current study was to assess whether training using the portable tool improves students fine motor skill, spatial perception, and orientation and may predict success in preclinical prosthetics courses. Material and Methods: A total of 42 third year dental students were included in this study. A valid dexterity test (Grooved Pegboard test) and a manual test using the portable tool (PhantHome) were conducted in direct and indirect visions using a mirror at two time points: T0: beginning of study, and T1: after training for one month with the portable tool at home. The students’ manual grades in the portable tool, Grooved test, and final prosthetics course grades were compared. Results: The results showed that indirect tasks were significantly more difficult to perform than direct tasks for PhantHome and Grooved tests at T0 and T1 (p < 0.0005). After practicing with the portable PhantHome tool (T1), the students’ scores of in PhantHome and Grooved tests improved significantly (p < 0.04). A regression analysis showed that students’ motor tasks scored at T0 predicted phantom course success in 86.8% of cases (p = 0.005). Conclusion: There was a positive transfer in learning: PhantHome training led to improved performance on the Grooved tests without further training on these tests. Therefore, training in the PhantHome tool can significantly improve performance in the prosthodontics phantom course. The prediction model predicted success in a prosthodontics course with 86% accuracy. Full article
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Article
(In-Vitro Comparison between Closed Versus Open CAD/CAM Systems) Comparison between Closed and Open CAD/CAM Systems by Evaluating the Marginal Fit of Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic Crowns
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 4534; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104534 - 16 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 723
Abstract
Background: This study compared the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD–CAM) used in open systems (OSs) and closed systems (CSs) for producing monolithic zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic crowns. Methods: 60 ZLS ceramic crowns [...] Read more.
Background: This study compared the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD–CAM) used in open systems (OSs) and closed systems (CSs) for producing monolithic zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic crowns. Methods: 60 ZLS ceramic crowns were cemented to abutment acrylic teeth; thirty crowns were designed and milled by an OS, and thirty by a CS. All crowns were sectioned for evaluating the marginal gap by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). To compare the marginal gap between CS and OS techniques, data were analyzed using the independent-samples Mann–Whitney U Test (α = 0.05). Results: AMD was found to be significantly better for the closed system (p < 0.05). Mean AMD values for the CS were 148 µm, and for the OS it was 196 µm. MG was found to be significantly better for the OS (p < 0.05). Mean MG values for the CS were 55 µm, and for the OS they were 38 µm. Conclusions: The marginal gap in relation to AMD was significantly better for CS. However, the marginal gap in relation to MG was significantly better for OS. Both techniques showed clinically acceptable MG values (<120 µm). Full article
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