Special Issue "Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Oral Hygiene, Periodontology and Peri-implant Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Carlos E. Nemcovsky

Department of Periodontology and Dental Implantology, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: soft and hard tissue regeneration; periodontal treatment; soft tissue management in implant supported rehabilitations; bone augmentation procedures; complications in dental implant procedures
Co-Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Miron Weinreb

Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel‐Aviv 69978, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bone regeneration and osteoprogenitor cells; skeletal manifestations of various diseases; prostaglandins as bone anabolic agents

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue entitled “Soft and hard tissue regeneration” will cover both periodontal and implant therapies.

Regenerative periodontal treatment goal is to restore functional periodontal support offering a valuable treatment alternative even for teeth with large periodontal destruction, which may be successfully treated and maintained in health for long periods. In most cases where teeth are extracted for periodontal reasons, implant therapy will demand large bone augmentation procedures.

Lack of sufficient bone volume may prevent placement of dental implants.

In extreme cases, large bone reconstruction is indispensable before implant placement can be performed. Although, most bone grafts are only able to fill and maintain a space, where bone regeneration can occur (“osseoconductive”), the ideal bone graft will also promote osseous regeneration (“osseoinductive”).

Several bone augmentation procedures have been described, each, presenting advantages and shortcomings.

Success of bone augmentation procedures depends on the presence of bone forming cells, primary wound closure over the augmented area, space creation and maintenance where bone can grow and proper angiogenesis of the grafted area.

Factors that influence the choice of the surgical technique are the estimated duration of surgical procedure, its complexity, cost, total estimated length of procedure until the final rehabilitations may be installed and the surgeons’ experience.

This special issue will have a definite clinical orientation, and be entirely dedicated to soft and hard tissue regenerative treatment alternatives, both in periodontal and implant therapy, discussing their rationale, indications and clinical procedures. Internationally renowned leading researchers and clinicians will contribute with articles in their field of expertize.

Prof. Dr. Carlos E. Nemcovsky
Prof. Dr. Miron Weinreb
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • periodontal treatment
  • dental implants
  • orthodontic treatment
  • complications
  • pre-clinical research
  • clinical research
  • esthetics
  • maxillary sinus
  • bone augmentation
  • bone grafts
  • membranes
  • osseo-conduction
  • osseo-induction
  • growth factors
  • therapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration—A Special Issue of Dentistry Journal
Dent. J. 2018, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6010004
Received: 25 December 2017 / Revised: 25 December 2017 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
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Abstract
This Special Issue entitled “Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration” will cover both periodontal and implant therapies.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration)

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Evaluation of an In Situ Hardening β-Tricalcium Phosphate Graft Material for Alveolar Ridge Preservation. A Histomorphometric Animal Study in Pigs
Dent. J. 2018, 6(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6030027
Received: 21 April 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a resorbable alloplastic in situ hardening bone grafting material for alveolar ridge preservation in a swine model. Seven Landrace pigs were used. In each animal, the maxillary left and right deciduous second
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The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a resorbable alloplastic in situ hardening bone grafting material for alveolar ridge preservation in a swine model. Seven Landrace pigs were used. In each animal, the maxillary left and right deciduous second molars were extracted, and extraction sites were either grafted with a resorbable alloplastic in situ hardening bone substitute, composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules coated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), or left unfilled to heal spontaneously. Animals were euthanized after 12 weeks, and the bone tissue was analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically. Linear changes of ridge width were also clinically measured and analyzed. Pronounced bone regeneration was found in both experimental and control sites, with no statistically significant differences. At the experimental sites, most of the alloplastic grafting material was resorbed and remnants of the graft particles were severely decreased in size. Moreover, experimental sites showed, in a statistically nonsignificant way, less mean horizontal dimensional reduction of the alveolar ridge (7.69%) compared to the control sites (8.86%). In conclusion, the β-TCP/PLGA biomaterial performed well as a biocompatible resorbable in situ hardening bone substitute when placed in intact extraction sockets in this animal model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Use of Tooth Particles as a Biomaterial in Post-Extraction Sockets. Experimental Study in Dogs
Dent. J. 2018, 6(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6020012
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 16 April 2018 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 / Published: 6 May 2018
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Abstract
Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate new bone formation derived from freshly crushed extracted teeth, grafted immediately in post-extraction sites in an animal model, compared with sites without graft filling, evaluated at 30 and 90 days. Material and Methods
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Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate new bone formation derived from freshly crushed extracted teeth, grafted immediately in post-extraction sites in an animal model, compared with sites without graft filling, evaluated at 30 and 90 days. Material and Methods: The bilateral premolars P2, P3, P4 and the first mandibular molar were extracted atraumatically from six Beagle dogs. The clean, dry teeth were ground immediately using the Smart Dentin Grinder. The tooth particles obtained were subsequently sieved through a special sorting filter into two compartments; the upper container isolating particles over 1200 μm, the lower container isolated particles over 300 μm. The crushed teeth were grafted into the post-extraction sockets at P3, P4 and M1 (test group) (larger and smaller post-extraction alveoli), while P2 sites were left unfilled and acted as a control group. Tissue healing and bone formation were evaluated by histological and histomorphometric analysis after 30 and 90 days. Results: At 30 days, test site bone formation was greater in the test group than the control group (p < 0.05); less immature bone was observed in the test group (25.71%) than the control group (55.98%). At 90 days, significant differences in bone formation were found with more in the test group than the control group. No significant differences were found in new bone formation when comparing the small and large alveoli post-extraction sites. Conclusions: Tooth particles extracted from dog’s teeth, grafted immediately after extractions can be considered a suitable biomaterial for socket preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Videoscope-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery (VMIS) for Bone Regeneration around Teeth and Implants: A Literature Review and Technique Update
Dent. J. 2018, 6(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6030030
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 6 July 2018
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Abstract
Background—The literature related to minimally invasive periodontal surgery is reviewed. This includes the original minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure for bone regeneration, the modification of MIS for the minimally invasive surgery technique (MIST) and modified MIST (M-MIST) procedures, and the introduction of the
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Background—The literature related to minimally invasive periodontal surgery is reviewed. This includes the original minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure for bone regeneration, the modification of MIS for the minimally invasive surgery technique (MIST) and modified MIST (M-MIST) procedures, and the introduction of the videoscope for oral surgical procedures and the ability to perform videoscope-assisted minimally invasive surgery (VMIS). The evolution from MIS through MIST to the current VMIS is reviewed. The results from studies of each of these methods are reported. Conclusion—The use of small incisions that produce minimal trauma and preserve most of the blood supply to the periodontal and peri-implant tissues results in improved regenerative outcomes, minimal to absent negative esthetic outcomes, and little or no patient discomfort. Minimally invasive procedures are a reliable method to regenerate periodontal tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft and Hard Tissue Regeneration)
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