Special Issue "Ultrasonic Modelling for Non-destructive Testing"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Habil. Michel Darmon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Paris-Saclay University, CEA, List, F-91120 Palaiseau, France
Interests: ultrasonics; nondestructive testing; wave propagation in solids and complex media; acoustic/elastic wave scattering and diffraction; surface acoustic waves; ray tracing; high frequency modelling; transducers; acoustic signal processing; noise analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences (IF: 2.474) focuses on the advancement of modeling methods for the ultrasonic Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of materials such as metals, concrete, composites, metamaterials, and biomaterials. Ultrasonic techniques are employed for non-destructive purposes in order to evaluate the properties and damage states of structures devised for numerous applications (engineering, building materials, medicine, etc.). With this method, different kinds of material properties (mechanical, chemical, physical, biological, etc.) with various physical states/compositions (e.g., solid, liquid, heterogeneous, inhomogeneous, complex, and moving media) can be investigated. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, ultrasonic wave techniques for classical non-destructive evaluation, structural health and condition monitoring of structures, existing or novel methods for imaging, ultrasonic characterization, non-linear acoustics, acoustic emission, laser ultrasonics, additive manufacturing, medical applications, sensors, and signal and noise analysis.

The current Special Issue aims to explore advances in ultrasonic modeling methods for understanding or predicting NDT inspections. Simulating a NDT measurement generally requires modeling the propagation and scattering of ultrasonic waves from flaws/damage/interfaces and the associated wave characteristics, such as propagation and scattered amplitudes, times of flight, velocities, and attenuation dispersion, which are highly sensitive to material properties. Developed simulation tools may rely on different mathematical/physical theories or assumptions; for instance, semi-analytical, numerical, and hybrid models may be used for direct simulation and model benchmarking, inversion theory for imaging and damage localization, and artificial intelligence.

I invite you to submit novel achievements in the understanding and modeling of ultrasonic waves for NDT applications and welcome high-quality research and review papers on theoretical, practical, and validation aspects.

Prof. Dr. Habil. Michel Darmon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Ultrasonic wave modeling
  • Non-destructive Testing/Evaluation (NDT/NDE)
  • Material properties
  • Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Metamaterials
  • Ultrasonic imaging and inversion
  • Ultrasonic characterization
  • Non-linear acoustics
  • Acoustic Emission (AE)
  • Laser Ultrasonics
  • Signal and noise analysis
  • Wave propagation and scattering
  • Semi-analytical, numerical, and hybrid models and benchmarking
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning
  • Medical applications and imaging
  • Additive manufacturing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Simulation of Fluid Dynamics Monitoring Using Ultrasonic Measurements
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(15), 7065; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11157065 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 168
Abstract
The simulation of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in a moving fluid will improve the efficiency of the ultrasonic flow monitoring and that of the in-service monitoring for various reactors in several industries. The most recent simulations are mostly limited to 3D representations [...] Read more.
The simulation of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in a moving fluid will improve the efficiency of the ultrasonic flow monitoring and that of the in-service monitoring for various reactors in several industries. The most recent simulations are mostly limited to 3D representations of the insonified volume but without really considering the temporal aspect of the flow. The advent of high-performance computing (HPC) now makes it possible to propose the first 4D simulations, with the representation of the inspected medium evolving over time. This work is based on a highly accurate double simulation. A first computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, performed in previous work, described the fluid medium resulting from the mixing of hot jets in a cold opaque fluid. There have been many sensor developments over the years in this domain, as ultrasounds are the only method able to give information in an opaque medium. The correct design of these sensors, as well as the precise and confident analysis of their measurements, will progress with the development of the modeling of wave propagation in such a medium. An important parameter to consider is the flow temperature description, as a temperature gradient in the medium deflects the wave path and may sometimes cause its division. We develop a 4D wave propagation simulation in a very realistic, temporally fluctuating medium. A high-performance simulation is proposed in this work to include an ultrasonic source within the medium and to calculate the wave propagation between a transmitter and a receiver. The analysis of the wave variations shows that this through-transmission setup can track the jet mixing time variations. The steps needed to achieve these results are described using the spectral-element-based numerical tool SPECFEM3D. It is shown that the low-frequency fluctuation of the liquid metal flow can be observed using ultrasonic measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasonic Modelling for Non-destructive Testing)
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Article
Quantitative Inspection of Complex-Shaped Parts Based on Ice-Coupled Ultrasonic Full Waveform Inversion Technology
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 4433; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11104433 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 292
Abstract
Ultrasonic methods have been extensively developed in nondestructive testing for various materials and components. However, accurately extracting quantitative information about defects still remains challenging, especially for complex structures. Although the immersion technique is commonly used for complex-shaped parts, the large mismatch of acoustic [...] Read more.
Ultrasonic methods have been extensively developed in nondestructive testing for various materials and components. However, accurately extracting quantitative information about defects still remains challenging, especially for complex structures. Although the immersion technique is commonly used for complex-shaped parts, the large mismatch of acoustic impedance between water and metal prevents effective ultrasonic transmission and leads to a low signal-to-noise ratio(SNR). In this paper, a quantitative imaging method is proposed for complex-shaped parts based on an ice-coupled full waveform inversion (FWI) method. Numerical experiments were carried out to quantitatively inspect the various defects in a turbine blade. Firstly, the k-space pseudospectral method was applied to simulate ice-coupled ultrasonic testing for the turbine blade. The recorded full wavefields were then applied for a frequency-domain FWI based on the Limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno (L-BFGS) method. With a carefully selected iterative number and frequency, a successive-frequency FWI can well detect half wavelength defects. Extended studies on an open notch with different orientations and multiple adjacent defects proved its capability to detect different types of defects. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted with inaccurate initial velocity models with a relative error of ±2%, demonstrating its robustness even with a certain inaccuracy. This study demonstrates that the proposed method has a high potential to inspect complex-shaped structures with an excellent resolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasonic Modelling for Non-destructive Testing)
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Article
Multichannel Real-Time Electronics Platform for the Estimation of the Error in Impact Localization with Different Piezoelectric Sensor Densities
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 4027; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11094027 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 318
Abstract
The work presents a structural health monitoring (SHM) electronic system with real-time acquisition and processing for the determination of impact location in laminate. The novelty of this work is the quantitative evaluation of impact location errors using the Lamb wave guided mode S [...] Read more.
The work presents a structural health monitoring (SHM) electronic system with real-time acquisition and processing for the determination of impact location in laminate. The novelty of this work is the quantitative evaluation of impact location errors using the Lamb wave guided mode S0, captured and processed in real-time by up to eight piezoelectric sensors. The differential time of arrival is used to minimize an error function for the position estimation. The impact energy is correlated to the amplitudes of the antisymmetric (A0) mode and the electronic design is described to avoid saturation for signal acquisition. The same electronic system is designed to acquire symmetric (S0) low level signals by adequate gain, bandwidth, and signal-to-noise ratio. Such signals propagate into a 1.4 mm thick aluminum laminate at the group velocity of 5150 m/s with frequency components above 270 kHz, and can be discriminated from the A0 mode to calculate accurately the differential arrival time. The results show that the localization error stabilizes at a value comparable with the wavelength of the S0 mode by increasing the number of sensors up to six, and then remains constant at up to eight sensors. This suggests that a compromise can be found between sensor density and localization error. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasonic Modelling for Non-destructive Testing)
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