Special Issue "Laser Spectroscopy"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Sola
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Guest Editor
Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellow, Professur für Laserbasierte Methoden der großflächigen Oberflächenstrukturierung, Institut für Fertigungstechnik, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01062, Dresden, Germany
Interests: laser spectroscopy; laser–matter interaction; ultrashort lasers; laser processing; ophthalmic polymers; ocular tissues; photonic devices
Dr. Eugenio Cantelar
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, 28049, Spain
Interests: laser spectroscopy; spectroscopic characterization; rare-earth doped materials; nanoparticles; active waveguides; optical amplification; lasers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since their invention in 1960, lasers have been successfully applied to both fundamental and applied research. In particular, laser spectroscopy is a powerful technique which has been used in physics, chemistry, and biology to study and unravel the structure of matter by using laser light as a pumping probe. The development of solid-state and tunable lasers working in both continuous and pulsed mode has resulted in a sensitive, versatile tool for sensing and analytical applications.

This Special Issue covers the whole spectrum of laser spectroscopy, ranging from the study of the interaction of radiation with matter in terms of absorption, fluorescence, and scattering to UV–vis–IR spectroscopy, imaging, ultrafast laser spectroscopy, optical sources, and remote sensing. The topics of this Special Issue include fundamental, applied, technological, and industrial aspects of laser spectroscopy. Novel applications in optics, photonics, energy, and biomedicine, as well in materials science and technology, are warmly welcome.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, and reviews would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Daniel Sola
Dr. Eugenio Cantelar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interaction between laser radiation and matter
  • absorption
  • fluorescence
  • scattering
  • UV–vis–IR spectroscopy
  • laser-based sensing in solids
  • imaging
  • laser sources
  • simulation analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Band-Limited Reference-Free Speckle Spectroscopy: Probing the Fluorescent Media in the Vicinity of the Noise-Defined Threshold
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(5), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10051629 - 29 Feb 2020
Abstract
A method of reference-free speckle spectroscopy based on the statistical analysis of intensity spatial fluctuations of the spectrally-selected multiple-scattered fluorescence radiation is examined in the case of the finite-band spectral selection of fluorescence light emitted by the laser-pumped random medium, and detection conditions [...] Read more.
A method of reference-free speckle spectroscopy based on the statistical analysis of intensity spatial fluctuations of the spectrally-selected multiple-scattered fluorescence radiation is examined in the case of the finite-band spectral selection of fluorescence light emitted by the laser-pumped random medium, and detection conditions far from the ideal case. Intensity fluctuations are recorded during point-to-point scanning of the surface of a random multiple-scattering medium, which is characterized by the dependences of the second- and third-order statistical moments of intensity on the wavelength of detected spectrally selected light. In turn, the statistical moments of intensity fluctuations are determined by the average propagation path of fluorescent radiation in the medium. This makes it possible to analyze the features of the light-medium interactions at a scale of the order of the transport mean free path of radiation propagation in the medium. Depending on the spectral selection conditions, the method is applicable for characterizing micro- or nano-structured fluorescent layers with thicknesses from tens of micrometers to several millimeters. In the examined case, the finite-band spectral selection results in the values of coherence length of the detected fluorescence radiation compared with the ensemble-averaged absolute value of the path-length difference between the stochastically interfering and spectrally selected partial contributions to the fluorescence field. In addition, non-ideal detection conditions (usage of a multimode optical fiber in the light-collecting unit) cause additional strong damping of the detected speckle intensity fluctuations. These factors lead to a remarkable suppression of spatial fluctuations of the fluorescence intensity in the course of spatially- and spectrally-resolved surface scanning of the laser-pumped probed random medium. Nevertheless, with appropriate procedures of the intrinsic noise reduction and data correction, the obtained spectral dependencies of the normalized third-order statistical moment of the band-limited fluorescence intensity clearly indicate the fluorescence propagation features in the probed multiple-scattering random media (such as a strong influence of the scattering strength and multiple self-absorption–re-emission events on the average propagation path of light in the medium).The possibilities of noise reduction and data correction in the case of applying the band-limited reference-free spectroscopic instrumentation with low spectral and spatial resolution are illustrated by the experimental results obtained using the Rhodamine-6G-doped and continuous wave (CW)-laser-pumped layers of the densely packed titania and silica particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Spectroscopy)
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Open AccessArticle
Precise Measurement of Hyperfine Structure of Cesium 7S1/2 Excited State
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020525 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
We present a precise measurement of the hyperfine structure of cesium 7S1/2 excited state by employing electromagnetically induced spectroscopy (EIS) with a cesium three-level cascade (6S1/26P3/27 [...] Read more.
We present a precise measurement of the hyperfine structure of cesium 7 S 1 / 2 excited state by employing electromagnetically induced spectroscopy (EIS) with a cesium three-level cascade ( 6 S 1 / 2 6 P 3 / 2 7 S 1 / 2 ) atom in a room temperature vapor cell. A probe laser, λ p = 852 nm, was coupled to a transition | 6 S 1 / 2 | 6 P 3 / 2 , related frequency locked to the resonance hyperfine transition of | 6 S 1 / 2 | 6 P 3 / 2 with a Fabry–Perot (FP) cavity and an electro-optic modulator (EOM). A coupling laser, λ c = 1470 nm, drove the | 6 P 3 / 2 | 7 S 1 / 2 transition with the frequency scanned over the | 6 P 3 / 2 | 7 S 1 / 2 transition line. The hyperfine level interval was extracted to be 2183.61 ± 0.50 MHz by analyzing EIS spectroscopy. The optical–optical double-resonance (OODR) spectroscopy is also presented for comparison, with the corresponding value of the hyperfine level interval being 2183.48 MHz ± 0.04 MHz, and the measured hyperfine splitting of excited 7 S 1 / 2 state is shown to be in excellent agreement with the previous work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Spectroscopy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Far Off-Resonance Laser Frequency Stabilization Technology
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 3255; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10093255 - 07 May 2020
Abstract
In atomic physics experiments, a frequency-stabilized or ‘locked’ laser source is commonly required. Many established techniques are available for locking close to an atomic resonance. However, in many instances, such as atomic magnetometer and magic wavelength optical lattices in ultra-cold atoms, it is [...] Read more.
In atomic physics experiments, a frequency-stabilized or ‘locked’ laser source is commonly required. Many established techniques are available for locking close to an atomic resonance. However, in many instances, such as atomic magnetometer and magic wavelength optical lattices in ultra-cold atoms, it is desirable to lock the frequency of the laser far away from the resonance. This review presents several far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization methods, by which the frequency of the probe beam can be locked on the detuning as far as several tens of gigahertz (GHz) away from atomic resonance line, and discusses existing challenges and possible future directions in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Spectroscopy)
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