Bioprocessing and Fermentation Technology for Biomass Conversion

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 2256

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
International Advanced Energy Science Research and Education Center (IAESREC), Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Interests: biomass conversion to biofuel; biochemicals; biomaterials; fermentation; bioprocess engineering; microbial biotechnology; biochemical engineering; applied microbiology

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Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Microbiome Biotechnology, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
Interests: industrial biotechnology; bioconversion; bioengineering; bioprocesses; biomass and residues; biorefineries; microbial conversion processes; microbiology
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Guest Editor
School of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
Interests: conversion of biomass and wet wastes into bioenergy and bioproducts; algal biotechnology; waste to energy; energy and nutrient cycling; thermochemical and biological processing of biomass
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomass and biorefinery play a crucial role in addressing the pressing challenges of energy security, climate change, and sustainable development. Biomass is the only renewable resource that can be converted to chemicals and materials, in addition to energy.

The utilization of renewable biomass resources for energy, material, and chemical production offers significant environmental advantages over fossil fuels, as it reduces greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on non-renewable resources. The Special Issue entitled "Bioprocessing and Fermentation Technology for Biomass Conversion" focuses on advancements in bioprocessing and fermentation technologies that enable the efficient conversion of biomass into bioenergy, chemicals, and materials.

This Special Issue includes the development of new technologies, novel feedstocks, biomass pretreatments, fermentation strategies, and the utilization of microorganisms in monoculture, coculture, and consortium systems. Additionally, studies on microbial engineering, cell factories, process optimization, algal biotechnology, anaerobic digestion, upstream and downstream processing, enzyme discovery and applications, life cycle assessment (LCA), and other related areas are also encouraged. The collection of articles will provide valuable insights into the latest research and innovation in the field, advancing the prospects of sustainable biorefinery and bioenergy production.

By exploring innovative strategies and solutions, this Special Issue contributes to the advancement of sustainable energy systems and the realization of a greener future.

Dr. Harifara Rabemanolontsoa
Dr. Joachim Venus
Dr. Andrew Ross
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioprocessing
  • fermentation technologies
  • biomass conversion
  • bioenergy production
  • fermentation strategies
  • microorganisms
  • bio-catalytic conversion
  • monoculture, coculture, consortium
  • microbial engineering
  • metabolic engineering
  • genome engineering
  • gene expression control
  • cell factory
  • process optimization
  • algal biotechnology
  • anaerobic digestion
  • upstream and downstream processing
  • enzyme discovery and applications
  • life cycle assessment (LCA)
  • biorefinery
  • bioenergy production

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 177 KiB  
Editorial
Bioprocessing and Fermentation Technology for Biomass Conversion
by Adeline A. J. Wall, Harifara Rabemanolontsoa and Joachim Venus
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010005 - 19 Dec 2023
Viewed by 767
Abstract
In an era where concerns about climate change intersect with the global energy crisis, there is a growing emphasis on alternative resources [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprocessing and Fermentation Technology for Biomass Conversion)

Review

Jump to: Editorial

16 pages, 1008 KiB  
Review
Potential Applications of Yeast Biomass Derived from Small-Scale Breweries
by Marcin Łukaszewicz, Przemysław Leszczyński, Sławomir Jan Jabłoński and Joanna Kawa-Rygielska
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2529; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062529 - 17 Mar 2024
Viewed by 576
Abstract
Yeast biomass, a brewery by-product of the world’s substantial alcohol beverage industry, finds successful applications in the fodder industry and food additive production. This is attributed to its rich nutritional profile that comprises high protein and vitamin content. Nonetheless, in small-scale breweries, yeast [...] Read more.
Yeast biomass, a brewery by-product of the world’s substantial alcohol beverage industry, finds successful applications in the fodder industry and food additive production. This is attributed to its rich nutritional profile that comprises high protein and vitamin content. Nonetheless, in small-scale breweries, yeast slurries present a significant challenge, as the quantities obtained are insufficient to attract the attention of the food industry. The disposal of yeast contributes substantially to the organic load of wastewater (approximately 40%) and elevates water consumption (3–6 hL/hL of beer), consequently escalating production costs and environmental impact. In recent years, diverse potential applications of products derived from yeast biomass have emerged, encompassing the substitution of sera in cell culture media, the fortification of animal feed with vitamins and selenium, the utilization of beta-glucan in low-fat food products, and the development of functional foods incorporating yeast-derived peptides. These peptides exhibit the potential to safeguard the gastric mucosa, prevent hypertension, and address neurodegenerative disorders. The rising demand for value-added products derived from yeast underscores the potential profitability of processing yeast from small breweries. Due to the high equipment costs associated with yeast biomass fractionation, the establishment of specialized facilities in collaboration with multiple small breweries appears to be the most optimal solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprocessing and Fermentation Technology for Biomass Conversion)
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