Substrate Tolerant Fermentations

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020) | Viewed by 7402

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Microbiome Biotechnology, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
Interests: industrial biotechnology; bioconversion; bioengineering; bioprocesses; biomass and residues; biorefineries; microbial conversion processes; microbiology
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Guest Editor
Bioprocess Engineering, Department of Biotechnology, Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin), Berlin, Germany
Interests: biotechnology; chemical engineering; microbial biotechnology; environmental biotechnology; fermentation; microbial culture; bioprocess engineering and fermentation technology; bioremediation; industrial biotechnology; bioprocess engineering; fermentation biotechnology; bioprocess technology; bioreactors; bioprocess optimization; bioprocess development; industrial microbiology; bioprocess; bioreactor design; acetone; disposable bioreactors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biotechnological routes present promising alternatives for the production of various platform chemicals such as alcohols and organic acids, among others. The wide variety of substrates that can be used and products that can be formed have made microbial fermentation an intensively investigated field.

One of the main hurdles for the production of biomolecules is maintaining a suitable supply of raw material that does not compete with food and feed supplies and, at the same time, maintains competitive prices. Lignocellulosic biomass represents the most abundant global source of biomass, and for this reason it has been largely utilized, alongside the increased use of several residues, waste materials, and agricultural by-products. Depending on the composition of those complex feedstocks, a mixture of sugars will be released. In addition, the seasonal and spatial changes of biomass provision require a higher flexibility of the bioprocesses. Besides, biogenic residual material (side streams from established (bio-)processes, food-/feed-production and agriculture) are promising feedstocks if prepared for utilization in bioprocesses for fine and bulk chemical production.

We are seeking excellent and innovative papers in the field of bioreactor cultivation based on the successive and/or parallel utilization of different carbon sources and nutrients in mono-, co- and mixed cultures. Those multi-feedstock bioprocesses could contribute to better resource efficiency and overall process performance. Articles that cover methods that improve the monitoring and control of such processes are also welcome.

Possible topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Pre-treatment and hydrolysis of different bio-renewables
  • Preparation of potential substrates for fermentation
  • Bulk and fine chemicals
  • Application of different process regimes (batch up to continuous mode)
  • Separated and/or simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF)
  • Pure and mixed culture systems
  • Scale-up and downstream processing for the abovementioned multi-feedstock processes
  • Scale-down methodologies for such processes
  • Improved monitoring and control, particularly dedicated to process safety at high feedstock flexibility

Dr. Joachim Venus
Dr.-Ing. Stefan Junne
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Multi-feedstock processes
  • Sustainable production of chemicals
  • Substrate tolerance
  • Bioprocess development
  • Robust microbial systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1349 KiB  
Article
Batch and Continuous Lactic Acid Fermentation Based on A Multi-Substrate Approach
by Agata Olszewska-Widdrat, Maria Alexandri, José Pablo López-Gómez, Roland Schneider and Joachim Venus
Microorganisms 2020, 8(7), 1084; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8071084 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 4368
Abstract
The utilisation of waste materials and industrial residues became a priority within the bioeconomy concept and the production of biobased chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to continuously produce L-lactic acid from different renewable substrates, in a multi-substrate [...] Read more.
The utilisation of waste materials and industrial residues became a priority within the bioeconomy concept and the production of biobased chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to continuously produce L-lactic acid from different renewable substrates, in a multi-substrate strategy mode. Based on batch experiments observations, Bacillus coagulans A534 strain was able to continuously metabolise acid whey, sugar beet molasses, sugar bread, alfalfa press green juice and tapioca starch. Additionally, reference experiments showed its behaviour in standard medium. Continuous fermentations indicated that the highest productivity was achieved when molasses was employed with a value of 10.34 g·L−1·h−1, while the lactic acid to sugar conversion yield was 0.86 g·g−1. This study demonstrated that LA can be efficiently produced in continuous mode regardless the substrate, which is a huge advantage in comparison to other platform chemicals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Substrate Tolerant Fermentations)
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16 pages, 1666 KiB  
Article
Entrapped Psychrotolerant Yeast Cells within Pine Sawdust for Low Temperature Wine Making: Impact on Wine Quality
by Antonia Terpou, Vassilios Ganatsios, Maria Kanellaki and Athanasios A. Koutinas
Microorganisms 2020, 8(5), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050764 - 20 May 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2569
Abstract
An alternative methodology is proposed for low temperature winemaking using freeze-dried raw materials. Pine sawdust was delignified and the received porous cellulosic material was applied as immobilization carrier of the psychrotolerant yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1. The immobilization of yeast cells was examined [...] Read more.
An alternative methodology is proposed for low temperature winemaking using freeze-dried raw materials. Pine sawdust was delignified and the received porous cellulosic material was applied as immobilization carrier of the psychrotolerant yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1. The immobilization of yeast cells was examined and verified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The immobilized biocatalyst and high-gravity grape must were separately freeze-dried without cryoprotectants and stored at room temperature (20–22 °C) for 3 months. The effect of storage on the fermentation efficiency of the immobilized biocatalyst at low temperatures (1–10 °C), as well as on the aromatic characteristics of the produced wines was evaluated. Storage time had no significant effect on the fermentation efficiency of the biocatalyst resulting in most cases in high ethanol production 13.8–14.8% v/v. The volatile fraction of the produced wines was examined using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). GC-MS/SPME analysis along with the organoleptic evaluation revealed in all produced wines a plethora of fresh and fruit aromatic notes. To conclude, fermentation kinetics and aromatic profile evaluation encourages the production of high-quality sweet wines at low temperatures using pine sawdust (Pinus halepensis) entrapped yeast cells as a promoter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Substrate Tolerant Fermentations)
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