Special Issue "Oxidative Damage: The Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Antioxidant Systems"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gianna Ferretti

Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Specialistiche ed Odontostomatologiche Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy
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Interests: https://www.scopus.com/authid/detail.uri?authorId=7201587884

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are produced by living organisms as a result of normal cellular metabolism. At low to moderate concentrations, they regulate cellular processes, but, at high concentrations, they can adversely modify cellulars lipids, proteins, and DNA. Free radicals and oxidative stress are associated chronic diseases in humans and are even thought to be involved in the ageing process. Human cells possess several mechanisms to protect against oxidative stress, including antioxidants, such as, uric acid, coenzyme Q, and glutathione, and enzymes (including catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase).

Diet is also important for oxidative stress in humans, as some foods contain antioxidants and other bioactive molecules that have antioxidant properties. These molecules can counteract oxidative stress and protect cellular macromolecules from damage. This Special Issue “Oxidative Damage: The Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Antioxidant Systems” welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature, examining the role of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants and the molecular mechanisms involved in their physiological roles.

Prof. Dr. Gianna Ferretti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidant
  • oxidant
  • oxidative stress
  • reactive oxygen species
  • reactive nitrogen species

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Oxidative Imbalance and Kidney Damage in Cafeteria Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome: Effect of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction
Antioxidants 2019, 8(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8030066
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 16 March 2019
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Abstract
Obesity is a potent risk factor for kidney disease as it increases the possibility of developing diabetes and hypertension, and it has a direct impact on the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In this study, we tested the effect [...] Read more.
Obesity is a potent risk factor for kidney disease as it increases the possibility of developing diabetes and hypertension, and it has a direct impact on the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In this study, we tested the effect of bergamot polyphenolic fraction in a cafeteria with diet-fed rats, an excellent experimental model for studying human metabolic syndrome, as it is able to induce severe obesity with insulin resistance and high plasma triglyceride levels more efficiently than a traditional lard-based high-fat diet used in rodent models. We analyzed the plasmatic oxidative balance by photometric tests, and the expression of cytoplasmic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase 1 and glutatione S-tranferasi P1) and apoptotic markers (Caspase 8 and 9) in kidney tissues by Western blot analysis. Our results clearly showed that the cafeteria diet induces a marked pro-oxidant effect: significant reduction of plasmatic antioxidant capacity; downregulation of cytoplasmic antioxidant enzymes expression; and activation of apoptotic pathways. All these hallmarks of redox disequilibrium were mitigated by treatment with polyphenolic fraction of bergamot, highlighting its antioxidant effect in the metabolic syndrome. Our data show that the link between obesity and renal damage could be represented by oxidative stress. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of the AGE/sRAGE Axis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma
Antioxidants 2019, 8(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8030055
Received: 23 January 2019 / Revised: 26 February 2019 / Accepted: 3 March 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
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Abstract
Glycative stress influences tumor progression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the advanced glycation end products/soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products (AGE/sRAGE) axis in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Blood samples were taken from 19 patients affected by MM [...] Read more.
Glycative stress influences tumor progression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the advanced glycation end products/soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products (AGE/sRAGE) axis in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Blood samples were taken from 19 patients affected by MM and from 16 sex-matched and age-matched healthy subjects. AGE and sRAGE axis were dosed in patients with MM and matched with controls. AGEs were measured by spectrofluorimetric methods. Blood samples for the determination of sRAGE were analyzed by ELISA. AGE levels were significantly reduced in patients with respect to controls. Instead, sRAGE was significantly elevated in patients affected by MM compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, we showed that there was a statistically significant difference in sRAGE according to the heavy and light chain. IgA lambda had significantly higher sRAGE values than IgA kappa, IgG kappa, and IgG Lambda MM patients. From our data emerges the role of the sRAGE/AGE axis in MM. Since AGE is a positive regulator of the activity of RAGE, circulating sRAGE concentrations may reflect RAGE expression and may be raised in parallel with serum AGE concentrations as a counter-system against AGE-caused tissue damage. Serum concentrations of AGE and sRAGE could therefore become potential therapeutic targets. Full article
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