Special Issue "Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rosita Gabbianelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Camerino (MC), Italy
Interests: epigenetics and neurodegeneration; nutrigenomics; xenobiotics and redox system
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Laura Bordoni
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Camerino (MC), Italy
Interests: nutrigenomics; epigenetics and environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrigenomics aims to evaluate the impact of dietary components on gene expression; in particular, diet is rich in functional groups that, interacting with DNA and histones, can modulate gene expression directly or through chromatin remodeling. Moreover, diet represents an important source of compounds necessary for healthy gut microbiota. Indeed, gut bacteria can produce short-chain fatty acids from fibers contained in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, thanks to their ability to digest the β-1,4 glycosidic bond, distinctive of the fiber macromolecule.

One of the key points to promote proper nutrigenomic responses is to define adequate food intake and the proportion of macro- and micro-nutrients in accordance with the cultural dietary habits of different populations. Efforts should be addressed to promote education, in particular, to attract the interest of young generations, on the key role of early-life nutrition for the programming of adult health, and to instruct them on how to maintain health across life by a sustainable diet. Taking into account the impact of nutrigenomic research on population health, this Special Issue will publish original research papers, reviews, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses that will contribute to identify and characterize food rich in antioxidants as well as other food components useful to address proper nutrigenomics responses in our body, in order to promote health and appropriate dietary choices consistent with sustainable development. This Special Issue particularly welcomes articles from participants at the virtual edition of the 4th European summer school on Nutrigenomics that will take place on June, 21–25, 2021. This collection will provide further in-depth insight into a range of work and ideas discussed at the event, and also will present recent progress in these areas for researchers beyond the event. The acceptance of an abstract for presentation at the Summer School does not necessarily guarantee the acceptance for publication in the Special Issue, as each article will undergo a peer-reviewed process as established by the usual high standards and guidelines of the journal. Further information can be found at http://d7.unicam.it/nutrigenomics

Prof. Rosita Gabbianelli
Dr. Laura Bordoni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrigenomics
  • Food antioxidants
  • Diet
  • Food pesticides
  • Gut microbiota
  • Sustainable development

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Extra Virgin Olive Oil Extracts Modulate the Inflammatory Ability of Murine Dendritic Cells Based on Their Polyphenols Pattern: Correlation between Chemical Composition and Biological Function
Antioxidants 2021, 10(7), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10071016 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 589
Abstract
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) represents one of the most important health-promoting foods whose antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are mainly associated to its polyphenols content. To date, studies exploring the effect of EVOO polyphenols on dendritic cells (DCs), acting as a crosstalk between [...] Read more.
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) represents one of the most important health-promoting foods whose antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are mainly associated to its polyphenols content. To date, studies exploring the effect of EVOO polyphenols on dendritic cells (DCs), acting as a crosstalk between the innate and the adaptive immune response, are scanty. Therefore, we studied the ability of three EVOO extracts (cv. Coratina, Cima di Mola/Coratina, and Casaliva), characterized by different polyphenols amount, to regulate DCs maturation in resting conditions or after an inflammatory stimulus. Cima di Mola/Coratina and Casaliva extracts were demonstrated to be the most effective in modulating DCs toward an anti-inflammatory profile by reduction of TNF and IL-6 secretion and CD86 expression, along with a down-modulation of Il-1β and iNOS expression. From factorial analysis results, 9 polyphenols were tentatively established to play a synergistic role in modulating DCs inflammatory ability, thus reducing the risk of chronic inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Nutrigenomics of Dietary Lipids
Antioxidants 2021, 10(7), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10070994 - 22 Jun 2021
Viewed by 2055
Abstract
Dietary lipids have a major role in nutrition, not only for their fuel value, but also as essential and bioactive nutrients. This narrative review aims to describe the current evidence on nutrigenomic effects of dietary lipids. Firstly, the different chemical and biological properties [...] Read more.
Dietary lipids have a major role in nutrition, not only for their fuel value, but also as essential and bioactive nutrients. This narrative review aims to describe the current evidence on nutrigenomic effects of dietary lipids. Firstly, the different chemical and biological properties of fatty acids contained both in plant- and animal-based food are illustrated. A description of lipid bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and lipotoxicity is provided, together with an overview of the modulatory role of lipids as pro- or anti-inflammatory agents. Current findings concerning the metabolic impact of lipids on gene expression, epigenome, and gut microbiome in animal and human studies are summarized. Finally, the effect of the individual’s genetic make-up on lipid metabolism is described. The main goal is to provide an overview about the interaction between dietary lipids and the genome, by identifying and discussing recent scientific evidence, recognizing strengths and weaknesses, to address future investigations and fill the gaps in the current knowledge on metabolic impact of dietary fats on health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Antioxidative Molecules in Human Milk and Environmental Contaminants
Antioxidants 2021, 10(4), 550; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10040550 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 784
Abstract
Breastfeeding provides overall beneficial health to the mother-child dyad and is universally recognized as the preferred feeding mode for infants up to 6-months and beyond. Human milk provides immuno-protection and supplies nutrients and bioactive compounds whose concentrations vary with lactation stage. Environmental and [...] Read more.
Breastfeeding provides overall beneficial health to the mother-child dyad and is universally recognized as the preferred feeding mode for infants up to 6-months and beyond. Human milk provides immuno-protection and supplies nutrients and bioactive compounds whose concentrations vary with lactation stage. Environmental and dietary factors potentially lead to excessive chemical exposure in critical windows of development such as neonatal life, including lactation. This review discusses current knowledge on these environmental and dietary contaminants and summarizes the known effects of these chemicals in human milk, taking into account the protective presence of antioxidative molecules. Particular attention is given to short- and long-term effects of these contaminants, considering their role as endocrine disruptors and potential epigenetic modulators. Finally, we identify knowledge gaps and indicate potential future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Review
The Influence of Plant Extracts and Phytoconstituents on Antioxidant Enzymes Activity and Gene Expression in the Prevention and Treatment of Impaired Glucose Homeostasis and Diabetes Complications
Antioxidants 2021, 10(3), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10030480 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1350
Abstract
Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder resulting either from insulin resistance or an impaired insulin secretion. Prolonged elevated blood glucose concentration, the key clinical sign of diabetes, initiates an enhancement of reactive oxygen species derived from glucose autoxidation and glycosylation of proteins. Consequently, [...] Read more.
Diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder resulting either from insulin resistance or an impaired insulin secretion. Prolonged elevated blood glucose concentration, the key clinical sign of diabetes, initiates an enhancement of reactive oxygen species derived from glucose autoxidation and glycosylation of proteins. Consequently, chronic oxidative stress overwhelms cellular endogenous antioxidant defenses and leads to the acute and long-standing structural and functional changes of macromolecules resulting in impaired cellular functioning, cell death and organ dysfunction. The oxidative stress provoked chain of pathological events over time cause diabetic complications such as nephropathy, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, retinopathy, hypertension, and liver disease. Under diabetic conditions, accompanying genome/epigenome and metabolite markers alterations may also affect glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cells, muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. By providing deeper genetic/epigenetic insight of direct or indirect dietary effects, nutrigenomics offers a promising opportunity to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. Natural plant extracts, or their naturally occurring compounds, were shown to be very proficient in the prevention and treatment of different pathologies associated with oxidative stress including diabetes and its complications. Considering that food intake is one of the crucial components in diabetes’ prevalence, progression and complications, this review summarizes the effect of the major plant secondary metabolite and phytoconstituents on the antioxidant enzymes activity and gene expression under diabetic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
The Effect of Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Capacity of Diet on Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Phenotype: Nutrition as Therapeutic Tool?
Antioxidants 2021, 10(2), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10020157 - 22 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1874
Abstract
Chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress are contributing factors to many non-communicable diseases. A growing body of evidence indicates that dietary nutrients can activate the immune system and may lead to the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Fatty acids as macronutrients are key players [...] Read more.
Chronic inflammation and increased oxidative stress are contributing factors to many non-communicable diseases. A growing body of evidence indicates that dietary nutrients can activate the immune system and may lead to the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Fatty acids as macronutrients are key players for immunomodulation, with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids having the most beneficial effect, while polyphenols and carotenoids seem to be the most promising antioxidants. Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Obesity is a major risk factor for psoriasis, which leads to worse clinical outcomes. Weight loss interventions and, generally, dietary regimens such as gluten-free and Mediterranean diet or supplement use may potentially improve psoriasis’ natural course and response to therapy. However, data about more sophisticated nutritional patterns, such as ketogenic, very low-carb or specific macro- and micro-nutrient substitution, are scarce. This review aims to present the effect of strictly structured dietary nutrients, that are known to affect glucose/lipid metabolism and insulin responses, on chronic inflammation and immunity, and to discuss the utility of nutritional regimens as possible therapeutic tools for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Review
Hesperidin and SARS-CoV-2: New Light on the Healthy Function of Citrus Fruits
Antioxidants 2020, 9(8), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080742 - 13 Aug 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 13216
Abstract
Among the many approaches to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prevention, the possible role of nutrition has so far been rather underestimated. Foods are very rich in substances, with a potential beneficial effect on health, and some of these could have an antiviral action [...] Read more.
Among the many approaches to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prevention, the possible role of nutrition has so far been rather underestimated. Foods are very rich in substances, with a potential beneficial effect on health, and some of these could have an antiviral action or be important in modulating the immune system and in defending cells from the oxidative stress associated with infection. This short review draws the attention on some components of citrus fruits, and especially of the orange (Citrus sinensis), well known for its vitamin and flavonoid content. Among the flavonoids, hesperidin has recently attracted the attention of researchers, because it binds to the key proteins of the Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Several computational methods, independently applied by different researchers, showed that hesperidin has a low binding energy, both with the coronavirus “spike” protein, and with the main protease that transforms the early proteins of the virus (pp1a and ppa1b) into the complex responsible for viral replication. The binding energy of hesperidin to these important components is lower than that of lopinavir, ritonavir, and indinavir, suggesting that it could perform an effective antiviral action. Furthermore, both hesperidin and ascorbic acid counteract the cell damaging effects of the oxygen free radicals triggered by virus infection and inflammation. There is discussion about the preventive efficacy of vitamin C, at the dose achievable by the diet, but recent reviews suggest that this substance can be useful in the case of strong immune system burden caused by viral disease. Computational methods and laboratory studies support the need to undertake apposite preclinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies on the potential benefits of citrus fruit components for the prevention of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and Antioxidant Components of Diet)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop