Special Issue "Antioxidants from Agrofood Wastes for Cosmetic Industry: Insights into Green Extraction Approaches"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Extraction and Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2022 | Viewed by 1425

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francisca Rodrigues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
REQUIMTE- Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto, Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida 431, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: antioxidants compounds; skin application; ex-vivo assays; in-vitro 3D skin models; in-vivo assays; valorization of food by-products; green extraction techniques
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, concerns related to food by-products and their associated environmental problems have arisen as challenges for agrofood industries, governments, and civil society. It is estimated that 88 million tonnes of food waste are annually generated in the EU, with associated costs of 143 billion euros. Most of these residues are not transformed due to technical limitations or difficulties in market access, meaning solutions to deal with this problem are urgently needed. These topics make researchers aware of the bioactive composition of food wastes and of the possibility to obtain new active ingredients. The extractive process is the most critical step. Conventional extraction has long been applied to the recovery of bioactive compounds from natural sources, but this technique has limitations. Alternative greener extraction technologies, such as Subcritical Water Extraction (SWE), Supercritical Fluids Extraction (SFE) or Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE), have emerged as more sustainable and effective.

This Special Issue intends to explore the extraction of food by-products with antioxidative activity using eco-friendly techniques, aiming to reuse them as new cosmetic ingredients. Special attention will be given to in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies, mathematical models to optimize extraction procedures and deep insights into the characterization of bioactive compositions using analytical methodologies (such as HPLC-DAD, HPLC-MS, LC–MS, HPLC–MS and NMR). Regulatory review papers are welcome.

Dr. Francisca Rodrigues
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green extraction techniques
  • subcritical water extraction
  • ultrasound-assisted extraction
  • food by-products
  • 3D skin models
  • skin permeation
  • regulatory frameworks
  • biological properties
  • cosmetic formulation
  • anti-aging effects

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Liposomal Formulation to Exploit the Bioactive Potential of an Extract from Graciano Grape Pomace
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1270; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071270 - 27 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Antioxidant compounds with health benefits can be found in food processing residues, such as grape pomace. In this study, antioxidants were identified and quantified in an extract obtained from Graciano red grape pomace via a green process. The antioxidant activity of the extract [...] Read more.
Antioxidant compounds with health benefits can be found in food processing residues, such as grape pomace. In this study, antioxidants were identified and quantified in an extract obtained from Graciano red grape pomace via a green process. The antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed by the DPPH and FRAP tests, and the phenolic content by the Folin–Ciocalteu test. Furthermore, nanotechnologies were employed to produce a safe and effective formulation that would exploit the antioxidant potential of the extract for skin applications. Anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols and flavanols were the main constituents of the grape pomace extract. Phospholipid vesicles, namely liposomes, were prepared and characterized. Cryo-TEM images showed that the extract-loaded liposomes were predominantly spherical/elongated, small, unilamellar vesicles. Light scattering results revealed that the liposomes were small (~100 nm), homogeneously dispersed, and stable during storage. The non-toxicity of the liposomal formulation was demonstrated in vitro in skin cells, suggesting its possible safe use. These findings indicate that an extract with antioxidant properties can be obtained from food processing residues, and a liposomal formulation can be developed to exploit its bioactive value, resulting in a promising healthy product. Full article
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Article
Valorization of Kiwiberry Leaves Recovered by Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Skin Application: A Response Surface Methodology Approach
Antioxidants 2022, 11(4), 763; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11040763 - 12 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 625
Abstract
This study aims to evaluate the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions of antioxidants polyphenols from Actinidia arguta (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch. Ex Miq. (kiwiberry) leaves using a response surface methodology (RSM). The effects of solid:liquid ratio (2.5–10.0% w/v), time (20–60 [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions of antioxidants polyphenols from Actinidia arguta (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch. Ex Miq. (kiwiberry) leaves using a response surface methodology (RSM). The effects of solid:liquid ratio (2.5–10.0% w/v), time (20–60 min), and intensity (30–70 W/m2) on the total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant/antiradical activities were investigated. The optimal UAE conditions were achieved using a solid:liquid ratio of 10% (w/v) and an ultrasonic intensity of 30 W/m2 for 31.11 min. The results demonstrated that the optimal extract showed a high TPC (97.50 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g dw) and antioxidant/antiradical activity (IC50 = 249.46 µg/mL for ABTS assay; IC50 = 547.34 µg/mL for DPPH assay; 1440.13 µmol of ferrous sulfate equivalents (FSE)/g dw for ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) as well as a good capacity to scavenge superoxide and hypochlorous acid (respectively, IC50 = 220.13 μg/mL and IC50 =10.26 μg/mL), which may be related with the 28 phenolic compounds quantified. The in vitro cell assay demonstrated that the optimal extract did not decrease the keratinocytes’ (HaCaT) viability, while the fibroblasts’ (HFF-1) viability was greater than 70.63% (1000 µg/mL). This study emphasizes the great potential of kiwiberry leaves extracted by UAE for skin application. Full article
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Review

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Review
Application of Response Surface Methodologies to Optimize High-Added Value Products Developments: Cosmetic Formulations as an Example
Antioxidants 2022, 11(8), 1552; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11081552 - 10 Aug 2022
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Abstract
In recent years, green and advanced extraction technologies have gained great interest to revalue several food by-products. This by-product revaluation is currently allowing the development of high value-added products, such as functional foods, nutraceuticals, or cosmeceuticals. Among the high valued-added products, cosmeceuticals are [...] Read more.
In recent years, green and advanced extraction technologies have gained great interest to revalue several food by-products. This by-product revaluation is currently allowing the development of high value-added products, such as functional foods, nutraceuticals, or cosmeceuticals. Among the high valued-added products, cosmeceuticals are innovative cosmetic formulations which have incorporated bioactive natural ingredients providing multiple benefits on skin health. In this context, the extraction techniques are an important step during the elaboration of cosmetic ingredients since they represent the beginning of the formulation process and have a great influence on the quality of the final product. Indeed, these technologies are claimed as efficient methods to retrieve bioactive compounds from natural sources in terms of resource utilization, environmental impact, and costs. This review offers a summary of the most-used green and advanced methodologies to obtain cosmetic ingredients with the maximum performance of these extraction techniques. Response surface methodologies may be applied to enhance the optimization processes, providing a simple way to understand the extraction process as well as to reach the optimum conditions to increase the extraction efficiency. The combination of both assumes an economic improvement to attain high value products that may be applied to develop functional ingredients for cosmetics purposes. Full article
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