Comparative Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology in Animals

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3887

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigaciones Cerebrales, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Ver., Mexico
Interests: autism; rats; zebrafish; behavior; evolution; sex; reproduction; neuroscience

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Guest Editor
Instituto de Neuroetologia, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Ver., Mexico
Interests: animal behavior; neurobiology; interdisciplinary research in animals

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Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigaciones Cerebrales, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Ver., Mexico
Interests: neurobiology; sex; social bonds; learning; partner preference

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on the structure and function of the nervous system has revealed crucial information in our understanding of how this structure helps animals to perceive the environment and respond with adaptive behaviors. A wide range of studies, from the apparent simple nervous system of the hydra to the neural complexity of non-human primates, show scientist today that there is still a long way to go to comprehend such sophistication. A similarity and divergence comparative analysis in the animal kingdom is a must, considering that this effort can accelerate our knowledge on the structure, function, and evolution of the nervous system, and can consequently provide us with more tools to face the still unresolved field of neural diseases and disorders. Thus, a Special Issue on the comparative neuroanatomy and neurobiology in animals is imperative because remarkable information is produced constantly, and this Special Issue will provide an appropriate venue to share such findings.

As editors, we invite you to submit your original research or a review to this Special Issue. No doubt your contribution will enable us to better understand how the nervous system contributes to the life and evolution of animals, and to understand the underlying basis of misfunctions. 

Dr. Jorge Manzo
Prof. Dr. Porfirio Carrillo-Castilla
Dr. Genaro A. Coria-Avila
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • evolution
  • brain
  • neuron
  • glia
  • disorders
  • diseases
  • cognition
  • biophysics
  • neurophysiology
  • neurochemistry

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3154 KiB  
Article
Cerebral Vascularization and the Remaining Area Supply of the Internal Carotid Artery Derivatives of the Red Kangaroo (Osphranter rufus)
by Maciej Zdun, Jakub Jędrzej Ruszkowski and Maciej Gogulski
Animals 2023, 13(17), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13172744 - 29 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1232
Abstract
The red kangaroo (Osphranter rufus) is a member of Macropidideae superfamily. It is one of the four kangaroo species living nowadays, and it is the biggest one. It is native to Australia, where it is an abundant species living across the [...] Read more.
The red kangaroo (Osphranter rufus) is a member of Macropidideae superfamily. It is one of the four kangaroo species living nowadays, and it is the biggest one. It is native to Australia, where it is an abundant species living across the whole continent in stable populations. Outside its natural habit, the red kangaroo is a common species found in zoos and as patients in wildlife rehabilitation centers. Reports on kangaroo anatomy are scarce. Describing detailed anatomy is a base for establishing diagnostic and treatment protocols for different species of animals. Cardiovascular diseases and pathological changes suggestive of hypertension have been previously described in kangaroos. This creates a necessity for detailed studies on species’ vascular anatomy. New reports in the field of detailed vascular anatomy can bring considerable information that complements numerous studies on the evolution or biology of individual species. In this article, we describe the arterial vascularization of the brain and nearby regions of the cranial cavity using various anatomical techniques. The vascularization of the brain is discussed and compared with different mammalian species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology in Animals)
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28 pages, 7454 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Ethanol and Acetic acid on Behaviour of Extranidal Workers of the Narrow-Headed Ant Formica exsecta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) during a Field Experiment
by Julita Korczyńska, Anna Szczuka, Julia Urzykowska, Michał Kochanowski, Neptun Gabriela Andrzejczyk, Kacper Jerzy Piwowarek and Ewa Joanna Godzińska
Animals 2023, 13(17), 2734; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13172734 - 28 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1340
Abstract
Ethanol addiction belongs to the most important problems encountered in the domain of human mental health. The research on the behavioural effects of exposure to/consumption of ethanol are investigated largely with the help of animal models that also include insects, mainly fruit flies [...] Read more.
Ethanol addiction belongs to the most important problems encountered in the domain of human mental health. The research on the behavioural effects of exposure to/consumption of ethanol are investigated largely with the help of animal models that also include insects, mainly fruit flies and honeybees. The effects of ethanol on ant behaviour remain, however, little known. In the present field study, we investigated the behaviour of workers of the narrow-headed ant (Formica exsecta) displayed in the vicinity of cotton pads soaked in water or in water solutions of ethanol or acetic acid during 5 min tests (n = 30 tests in each group). Both ethanol and acetic acid induced significant modifications of ant locomotion, exploratory behaviour, self-grooming behaviour, and aggressive social behaviour. We confirmed that acetic acid is aversive for the ants, but ethanol enhances their exploratory behaviour. We also found out that field studies may document more types of responses to experimental compounds than laboratory ones, as the tested animals may also escape from aversive substances. Our findings documented a wide spectrum of behavioural effects of exposure to ethanol and acetic acid in a highly social animal species and broadened the general knowledge about behavioural responses to these compounds encountered in animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative Neuroanatomy and Neurobiology in Animals)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Sucrose Binge Drinking during adolescence and later in adulthood modify pro and matureBDNF levels in the nucleus accumbens of male rats
Authors: 1Simsek Z, 1Torres A, 1Wilson N and 1Vazquez-Sanroman D
Affiliation: 1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology Oklahoma State Center for Health Sciences
Abstract: As a natural stimulus, sugar activated similar neural circuits involved in mediating reward. During adolescence, prime sucrose exposure may lead to a sensitization of the reward system, changing the response to rewarding stimuli in the adult stage. There are specific brain areas involved in reward and food preference behavior, one of the most important is the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, with dopaminergic projections traveling from the midbrain ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a potential regulator of neural plasticity and is involved in dopamine-reward modulation in the brain, then a potential candidate for understanding the neural basis of sucrose-induced reward. This study aimed to determine the effect of sucrose exposure during adolescence and adulthood using a sucrose binge drinking model and analyze the levels of proBDNF and MatureBDNF in the PFC and NAc, brain areas relevant to the cortical-mesolimbic system. Adolescent rats were exposed to 5 daily sucrose binge drinking sessions (SBD) followed by two months of sucrose-free and subsequent re-exposure to SBD. A separate group was sucrose-naïve during adolescence and exposed to one single SBD session as adults; levels of proBDNF and MatureBDNF were determined by an ELISA immunoassay kit. We found out that adolescent rats showed significantly higher levels of sucrose binge drinking at 5% concentration over 15% concentration. Main changes in pro and matureBDNF levels were observed in the NAc of animals exposed to SBD during adolescence and later as adults; more importantly, those changes are sucrose-dependent. SBD during adolescence changes the subsequent sucrose response as an adult, which may be mediated by the NAc pro-and mature BDNF.

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