Advances in Equine Sports Medicine, Therapy and Rehabilitation

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2014

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Equine and Veterinary Physiotherapy, Writtle University College, Lordship Road, Chelmsford CM1 3RR, UK
Interests: biomechanics; equine sports medicine; physiotherapy; regenerative therapy; rehabilitation; orthopaedics

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Guest Editor
David Marlin Consulting, Cambridge, UK
Interests: exercise physiology; equitation science; sports medicine; performance
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue, titled “Advances in equine sports medicine, therapy and rehabilitation”. The increasing advances in equine sports medicine, aiming to improve equine welfare and horse–human interaction, prompt us to further the reach of our research and to disseminate the knowledge and updates in equine sports. Furthermore, there is an increased presence of veterinary physiotherapy and rehabilitation modalities in equine sports medicine, which needs more evidence to support its effective and safe use within the sports horse population.

This Special Issue aims to collate advances in a variety of areas within equine sports medicine.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: exercise physiology, sports activities biomechanical demands, nutrition and specific supplementation in sport horses, advances in training guidelines, effort testing, the role of veterinarians in sport competitions, orthopaedic injuries associated with equine sports, new therapies for sports pathologies in horses, regenerative medicine, physiotherapy and rehabilitation in sport horses, and behavioural methods/ethology in sport horses, including aspects of animal–human interactions during sports activities, as well as other aspects of sports horses care (transport, housing, drug testing, preventive medicine and animal welfare).

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Roberta F. Godoy
Dr. David Marlin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sports medicine
  • sporting horses
  • equine sports training
  • nutrition in sporting horses
  • equine sports demands
  • biomechanics
  • sports injuries in horses
  • physiotherapy and rehabilitation in sporting horses
  • regenerative therapies in sporting horses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 11164 KiB  
Article
Conformational Defects in the Limbs of Menorca Purebred Horses and Their Relationship to Functionality
by Maria Ripollés-Lobo, Davinia I. Perdomo-González, Mercedes Valera and María D. Gómez
Animals 2024, 14(7), 1071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14071071 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 756
Abstract
Limb-conformation defects significantly influence equine performance and welfare, necessitating thorough investigation for effective management. This study examines the prevalence and genetic parameters of 14 limb-conformation defects in Menorca Purebred horses using data from 1120 records (509 animals with an average age of 101.87 [...] Read more.
Limb-conformation defects significantly influence equine performance and welfare, necessitating thorough investigation for effective management. This study examines the prevalence and genetic parameters of 14 limb-conformation defects in Menorca Purebred horses using data from 1120 records (509 animals with an average age of 101.87 ± 1.74 months) collected between 2015 and 2023. Defects were evaluated using a three-class scale by three appraisers, and a Bayesian approach via Gibbs sampling was employed to estimate genetic parameters including gender, birth period, stud selection criteria, evaluation age and appraiser as fixed effects. Splay-footed forelimb and closed hocks were the most prevalent defects (67.20% and 62.53%, respectively). Horses with any of the defects analyzed have been observed to obtain significantly lower scores for both walk and trot. Heritability estimates range from 0.12 (s.d.: 0.025) for closed hock to 0.30 (s.d.: 0.054) for base narrow, confirming the genetic influences on the expression of limb conformation defects. The divergent defect in hind limbs showed the highest genetic correlations with forelimb defects (camped under, −0.69; s.d: 0.32 and camped out, 0.70; s.d: 0.27). The significant genetic correlations between defects highlight the complexity of the relationships, which requires careful consideration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Equine Sports Medicine, Therapy and Rehabilitation)
0 pages, 1830 KiB  
Article
Changes in Head and Pelvic Movement Symmetry after Diagnostic Anaesthesia: Interactions between Subjective Judgement Categories and Commonly Applied Blocks
by Thilo Pfau, Kaitlyn Sophia Clark, David M. Bolt, Jaclyn Samantha Lai, Melanie Perrier, Jessica Bryce Rhodes, Roger K. Smith and Andrew Fiske-Jackson
Animals 2023, 13(24), 3769; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13243769 - 6 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 841
Abstract
Limited evidence is available relating gait changes to diagnostic anaesthesia. We investigated associations between specific movement patterns and diagnostic anaesthesia of different anatomical structures in a retrospective analysis. Referral-level lameness cases were included with the following criteria: presence of diagnostic anaesthesia of a [...] Read more.
Limited evidence is available relating gait changes to diagnostic anaesthesia. We investigated associations between specific movement patterns and diagnostic anaesthesia of different anatomical structures in a retrospective analysis. Referral-level lameness cases were included with the following criteria: presence of diagnostic anaesthesia of a forelimb and/or hind limb; subjective efficacy classified as “negative”, “partially positive”, or “positive”; quantitative gait data available from inertial measurement units. Gait changes were calculated for three forelimb (palmar digital, abaxial sesamoid, low 4-point nerve block) and five hind limb diagnostic blocks (tarso-metatarsal, metatarsophalangeal joint block, deep branch of lateral plantar, low 6-point, abaxial sesamoid nerve block). Mixed models (random factor “case”, fixed factors “diagnostic anaesthesia type” and “efficacy”, two-way interaction) assessed the head and pelvic movement (p < 0.05, Bonferroni correction). Four parameters were significantly affected by forelimb anaesthesia (N = 265) (all p ≤ 0.031) and six by hind limb anaesthesia (N = 342) efficacy (all p ≤ 0.001). All head movement parameters and pelvic push-off asymmetry were significantly affected by the two-way interaction after forelimb anaesthesia (all p ≤ 0.023) and two pelvic movement symmetry parameters by the two-way interaction after hind limb anaesthesia (all p ≤ 0.020). There are interactions between block efficacy and type resulting in changes in weight-bearing and push-off-associated head and pelvic movement symmetry after diagnostic anaesthesia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Equine Sports Medicine, Therapy and Rehabilitation)
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