Special Issue "Strategies to Control Foodborne Pathogens: Pre- and Post-harvest Safety of Animal Food Products"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal System and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Amit Vikram
Website
Guest Editor
Intralytix, Inc, Columbia, MD 21044, USA
Interests: Food Safety; Food Microbiology; Bacteriophages; Antimicrobial Resistance; Microbiome and metagenomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Achieving a safe food supply has become increasingly challenging in the modern era. Major challenges include both traditional and emerging pathogens in pre- and post-harvest operations. For instance, mitigation of bacterial pathogens Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter on-farm and in raw meat and poultry remains challenging. Additionally, viral pathogens continue to be a concern at food service and Listeria monocytogenes is a concern in ready-to-eat processed products. More recently antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens has emerged as major challenge. Novel strategies are required to understand the sources of antimicrobial resistance, transmission and mitigations approaches. Although traditional methods of pathogen control in the food matrix have improved food safety, numerous food safety incidences indicate a need to further develop and improve the food safety interventions at both pre- and postharvest levels.

We invite original research papers and reviews that address improved pathogen control on the farm, in raw and ready-to-eat animal products. Additional topics include pathogen-microbiome interactions in farmed animals, antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens and the transmission of pathogens from farm to final products.

Dr. Amit Vikram
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foodborne pathogens
  • meat safety
  • poultry
  • microbiome
  • food-safety interventions
  • on-farm food safety
  • pathogen transmission
  • antimicrobial resistance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Combined Effect of Organic Acids and Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Listeria monocytogenes in Chicken Legs
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1818; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101818 - 06 Oct 2020
Abstract
The combined effect of organic acid (citric, propionic or acetic acid) treatment and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the growth of L. monocytogenes in chicken legs kept at 4 °C for 10 days was evaluated. Chicken legs were inoculated with L. monocytogenes [...] Read more.
The combined effect of organic acid (citric, propionic or acetic acid) treatment and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the growth of L. monocytogenes in chicken legs kept at 4 °C for 10 days was evaluated. Chicken legs were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and washed with either 2% citric, 2% propionic or 2% acetic acid solution or distilled water (control). Legs were packaged under the following conditions: air, vacuum, 80% N2/20% CO2, 60% N2/40% CO2 or 40% N2/60% CO2. The greatest L. monocytogenes growth reductions after treatment were observed in chicken legs washed with propionic acid (2.14 log units lower compared to control legs). The lowest growth rates of L. monocytogenes were found in samples washed with acetic acid and packaged in atmospheres containing CO2. An extended shelf life was observed in legs packaged in 40% N2/60% CO2, but these packaging conditions did not reduce L. monocytogenes growth. Consequently, it is necessary to design measures in order to control this bacterial pathogen. Washing of chicken with 2% propionic acid or 2% acetic acid can decrease L. monocytogenes counts in chicken packaged in MAP. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Clostridium perfringens as Foodborne Pathogen in Broiler Production: Pathophysiology and Potential Strategies for Controlling Necrotic Enteritis
Animals 2020, 10(9), 1718; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10091718 - 22 Sep 2020
Abstract
Clostridium perfringens (Cp.) is the cause of human foodborne desease. Meat and poultry products are identified as the main source of infection for humans. Cp. can be found in poultry litter, feces, soil, dust, and healthy birds’ intestinal contents. Cp. strains are known [...] Read more.
Clostridium perfringens (Cp.) is the cause of human foodborne desease. Meat and poultry products are identified as the main source of infection for humans. Cp. can be found in poultry litter, feces, soil, dust, and healthy birds’ intestinal contents. Cp. strains are known to secrete over 20 identified toxins and enzymes that could potentially be the principal virulence factors, capable of degrading mucin, affecting enterocytes, and the small intestine epithelium, involved in necrotic enteritis (NE) pathophysiology, also leading to immunological responses, microbiota modification and anatomical changes. Different environmental and dietary factors can determine the colonization of this microorganism. It has been observed that the incidence of Cp-associated to NE in broilers has increased in countries that have stopped using antibiotic growth promoters. Since the banning of such antibiotic growth promoters, several strategies for Cp. control have been proposed, including dietary modifications, probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, phytogenics, organic acids, and vaccines. However, there are aspects of the pathology that still need to be clarified to establish better actions to control and prevention. This paper reviews the current knowledge about Cp. as foodborne pathogen, the pathophysiology of NE, and recent findings on potential strategies for its control. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Non-Typhoidal Salmonella at the Human-Food-of-Animal-Origin Interface in Australia
Animals 2020, 10(7), 1192; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10071192 - 14 Jul 2020
Abstract
Non-typhoidal Salmonella is a major zoonotic pathogen that plays a significant role in foodborne human salmonellosis worldwide through the consumption of contaminated foods, particularly those of animal origin. Despite a considerable reduction in human salmonellosis outbreaks in developed countries, Australia is experiencing a [...] Read more.
Non-typhoidal Salmonella is a major zoonotic pathogen that plays a significant role in foodborne human salmonellosis worldwide through the consumption of contaminated foods, particularly those of animal origin. Despite a considerable reduction in human salmonellosis outbreaks in developed countries, Australia is experiencing a continuous rise of such outbreaks in humans. This review of the literature highlights the reported non-typhoidal Salmonella outbreaks in humans as well as the occurrence of the pathogen in foods from animal sources throughout Australia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella infections from food animals are more often associated with at-risk people, such as immunocompromised and aged people or children. Although several animal-sourced foods were recognised as the catalysts for salmonellosis outbreaks in Australia, egg and egg-based products remained the most implicated foods in the reported outbreaks. This review further highlights the antimicrobial resistance trends of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates at the human–food interface, with a focus on clinically important antimicrobials in humans, by collating evidence from previous investigations in Australia. The rise in antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella, especially to antimicrobials commonly prescribed to treat human salmonellosis, has become a significant global public health concern. However, the overall prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Australia is considerably lower than in other parts of the world, particularly in terms of critically important antimicrobials for the treatment of human salmonellosis. The present review adds to our understanding of the global epidemiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella with emphasis on the past few decades in Australia. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Review

Clostridium perfringens as a foodborne pathogen in broilers production. Pathophysiology and potential strategies for controlling necrotic enteritis

Zuamí Villagrán-de la Mora 1, María Esther Macías-Rodríguez 2, Jenny Arratia-Quijada 3, Yesica Sughey Gonzalez-Torres1, Karla Nuño 3,*and Angélica Villarruel-López 2,*

1   Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario de Los Altos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Rafael Casillas Aceves 1200, Tepatitlán de Morelos 47620, Jalisco, Mexico; [email protected] (Z.V.-M.); [email protected] (Y.S.G.-T.)

2   Departamento de Farmacobiología, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Gral. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Olímpica 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico; [email protected] (M.E.M.-R); (A.V.-L.)

3. Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas, Centro Universitario de Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Nuevo Perif. Ote. 555, Ejido San José, Tateposco 45425 Tonalá, Jalisco, Mexico; [email protected] (J.A.-Q); (K.N.)

*   Correspondence: [email protected]; [email protected]

AbstractClostridium perfringens (Cp.), is a cause of human foodborne illness. Meat and poultry products are identified as the main source of infection for humans. It can be found in poultry litter, feces, soil, dust and in healthy bird intestinal contents. Cp. strains are known to secrete >20 identified toxins or enzymes that could potentially be the principal virulence factors (capable of degrading mucin, affecting enterocyte, and small intestine epithelium), involved in necrotic enteritis pathophysiology. Also, it leads immunological responses, microbiota modification and anatomical changes. The colonization of this microorganism can be determined by different environmental and dietary factors. It has been observed that the incidence of Cp-associated necrotic enteritis in broilers has increased in countries that have stopped using antibiotic growth promoters. Since the banning of such antibiotic growth promoters, several strategies for Cp control have been proposed, including: dietary modifications, probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, phytogenics, organic acids and vaccines.  However, there are aspects of the pathology that still need to be clarified, and thus establish better action for the control and prevention of the disease. This paper reviews the current knowledge about Cp. as foodborne pathogen, the pathophysiology of necrotic enteritis and recent findings on potential strategies for its control.

Keywords: C. perfringens, necrotic enteritis, pathophysiology, control strategies

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