Special Issue "Recent Advances in Poultry Respiratory and Immunosuppressive Viral Diseases"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Elena Catelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, Ozzano dell'Emilia (BO), Italy
Interests: Vaccines; Vaccine development; Marek's Disease; Avian Metapneumovirus; Avian Coronavirus; infectious Bursal Disease; Newcastle Disease; Avian Viral respiratory and immunosuppressive Diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Caterina Lupini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, Ozzano dell'Emilia (BO), Italy
Interests: avian viral diseases; vaccines; vaccine development; avian respiratory diseases; viral immunosuppressive disease
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giulia Mescolini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna BO, Italy
Interests: vaccines; vaccine development; marek's disease; avian metapneumovirus; avian coronavirus; infectious bursal disease; newcastle disease; avian viral respiratory and immunosuppressive diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Technological innovation has greatly improved the efficiency and the welfare of poultry production, especially in relation to nutrition, housing, and health management.

Despite the great strides made in terms of disease control, respiratory and immunosuppressive viral diseases remain one of the main challenges for the intensively reared poultry, while these infections can cause substantial economic losses themselves, and act as a trigger for even more serious bacterial disease.

We invite original research papers that address recent advances in the etiology, epidemiology, pathobiology, diagnosis, and control by vaccination of viral respiratory and immunosuppressive diseases of poultry. Studies on the major viral infections of poultry as Infectious bronchitis ( Avian coronavirus), Turkey rhinotrachetits and Swallen head disease (Avian metapneumovirus), Infectious Laryngotracheitis (Gallid alphaherpesvirus 1), Newcastle disease (Avian orthoavulavirus 1), Avian Influenza (Influenza A virus), Infectious bursal disease (Infectious bursal disease virus), Chicken infectious anemia (Chicken anemia virus), Marek’s disease (Gallid alphaherpesvirus 2), and Turkey hemorrhagic enteritis (Turkey siadenovirus A) are welcomed.  Minor, or newly observed, respiratory and immunosuppressive viral conditions will be also considered.  Additional topics may include the interaction between different pathogens in experimental or field conditions or the observation of well-known agents in unusual host species

Prof. Elena Catelli
Dr. Caterina Lupini
Dr. Giulia Mescolini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Poultry
  • Epidemiology
  • Pathobiology
  • Vaccines
  • Avian Coronavirus
  • Infectious Laryngotracheitis
  • Newcastle disease
  • Avian influenza
  • Infectious Bursal disease
  • Marek’s Disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Genetic Heterogeneity among Chicken Infectious Anemia Viruses Detected in Italian Fowl
Animals 2021, 11(4), 944; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11040944 - 27 Mar 2021
Viewed by 432
Abstract
Chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) is a pathogen of chickens associated with immunosuppression and with a disease named chicken infectious anemia. The present survey reports an epidemiological study on CIAV distribution in Italian broiler, broiler breeder and backyard chicken flocks. Twenty-five strains were [...] Read more.
Chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) is a pathogen of chickens associated with immunosuppression and with a disease named chicken infectious anemia. The present survey reports an epidemiological study on CIAV distribution in Italian broiler, broiler breeder and backyard chicken flocks. Twenty-five strains were detected by a specifically developed nested PCR protocol, and molecularly characterized by partial VP1 gene or complete genome sequencing. Viral DNA amplification was successfully obtained from non-invasive samples such as feathers and environmental dust. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the circulation of field or potentially vaccine-derived strains with heterogeneous sequences clustered into genogroups II, IIIa, and IIIb. Marker genome positions, reported to be correlated with CIAV virulence, were evaluated in field strains. In conclusion, this is the first survey focused on the molecular characteristics of Italian CIAVs, which have proved to be highly heterogeneous, implementing at the same time a distribution map of field viruses worldwide. Full article
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Article
Molecular Characterization of Velogenic Newcastle Disease Virus (Sub-Genotype VII.1.1) from Wild Birds, with Assessment of Its Pathogenicity in Susceptible Chickens
Animals 2021, 11(2), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020505 - 15 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 471
Abstract
Newcastle disease (ND) is considered to be one of the most economically significant avian viral diseases. It has a worldwide distribution and a continuous diversity of genotypes. Despite its limited zoonotic potential, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) outbreaks in Egypt occur frequently and result [...] Read more.
Newcastle disease (ND) is considered to be one of the most economically significant avian viral diseases. It has a worldwide distribution and a continuous diversity of genotypes. Despite its limited zoonotic potential, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) outbreaks in Egypt occur frequently and result in serious economic losses in the poultry industry. In this study, we investigated and characterized NDV in wild cattle egrets and house sparrows. Fifty cattle egrets and fifty house sparrows were collected from the vicinity of chicken farms in Kafrelsheikh Governorate, Egypt, which has a history of NDV infection. Lung, spleen, and brain tissue samples were pooled from each bird and screened for NDV by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify the 370 bp NDV F gene fragment. NDV was detected by RRT-PCR in 22 of 50 (44%) cattle egrets and 13 of 50 (26%) house sparrows, while the conventional RT-PCR detected NDV in 18 of 50 (36%) cattle egrets and 10 of 50 (20%) of house sparrows. Phylogenic analysis revealed that the NDV strains identified in the present study are closely related to other Egyptian class II, sub-genotype VII.1.1 NDV strains from GenBank, having 99.7–98.5% identity. The pathogenicity of the wild-bird-origin NDV sub-genotype VII.1.1 NDV strains were assessed by experimental inoculation of identified strains (KFS-Motobas-2, KFS-Elhamoul-1, and KFS-Elhamoul-3) in 28-day-old specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Cobb chickens. The clinical signs and post-mortem changes of velogenic NDV genotype VII (GVII) were observed in inoculated chickens 3 to 7 days post-inoculation, with 67.5–70% mortality rates. NDV was detected in all NDV-inoculated chickens by RRT-PCR and RT-PCR at 3, 7, and 10 days post-inoculation. The histopathological findings of the experimentally infected chickens showed marked pulmonary congestion and pneumonia associated with complete bronchial stenosis. The spleen showed histocytic cell proliferation with marked lymphoid depletion, while the brain had malacia and diffuse gliosis. These findings provide interesting data about the characterization of NDV in wild birds from Egypt and add to our understanding of their possible role in the transmission dynamics of the disease in Egypt. Further research is needed to explore the role of other species of wild birds in the epidemiology of this disease and to compare the strains circulating in wild birds with those found in poultry. Full article
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