Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Public Policy, Politics and Law".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 6738

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Michała Oczapowskiego 2, Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: veterinary public health; One Health; veterinary profession

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Minimum standards for veterinary programs are set by law and educational requirements at national levels. They are assumed to be of the highest quality and characterized by innovative approaches. Their aim is to harmonize the veterinary education provided to students in order to assure One Health and serve society. However, it is not widely recognized in society that, following graduation, veterinarians start their post-graduate education in the form of life-long learning. Veterinarians become business workers, accountants, communication specialists, mediators, legal experts, etc. Due to the high emotional intelligence that veterinarians tend to possess, they also struggle with high stress levels at work, leading to different forms of conflict and burnout.

I encourage all my veterinarian colleagues and their collaborators to share their experience, knowledge and results of research related to the problems they have encountered at work. Systemic solutions, algorithms, new education methodologies and analyses of trends both in the veterinary professional workplace and in veterinary research will be highly appreciated.

Dr. Joanna Wojtacka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • veterinary education
  • continuing education
  • stress
  • conflict
  • professional burnout
  • veterinary expertise
  • veterinary inspection
  • food and animal law
  • animal advocacy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5072 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Role of Veterinarians for Outcomes Related to the Health and Production of Dairy Small Ruminants in Greece
by Daphne T. Lianou and George C. Fthenakis
Animals 2023, 13(21), 3371; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13213371 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 836
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential benefits of veterinarians in improving the health and welfare of dairy sheep and goats by studying the associations of management practices employed in the farms with production- or health-related outcomes in sheep [...] Read more.
The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential benefits of veterinarians in improving the health and welfare of dairy sheep and goats by studying the associations of management practices employed in the farms with production- or health-related outcomes in sheep and goat farms in Greece. This work explored associations with ‘professional relationship with a veterinarian’ at 444 small ruminant dairy farms in an investigation performed around Greece, where 106 variables, related to infrastructure, animals, production outcomes, health management, health problems and human resources, were assessed. In 384 (86.5%) farms, a professional relationship with a veterinarian was maintained. The median value of visits made annually by veterinarians to these farms was five. In farms with a professional relationship with a veterinarian, significant differences were found in 24 variables (35.8%) related to management practices and 6 (30.0%) production- or health-related outcomes. In multivariable analysis, the following emerged with a significant association: epg counts in faecal samples (p = 0.014), average annual milk production per ewe/doe (p = 0.015), somatic cell counts in bulk-tank milk (p = 0.037), and annual incidence of clinical mastitis (p = 0.044). Moreover, associations of the characteristics of veterinarians emerged with somatic cell counts in bulk-tank milk: the gender (p < 0.0001) and the age (p = 0.004) of the veterinarians. The results attest that the application of veterinary advice and clinical services in sheep and goat dairy farms contributes to the improved health, production and welfare of animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession)
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13 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Ethical Concerns of the Veterinarian in Relation to Experimental Animals and In Vivo Research
by Łukasz Kiraga and Andrzej Dzikowski
Animals 2023, 13(15), 2476; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13152476 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1892
Abstract
Animal experiments, despite their controversial nature, play an indispensable role in scientific advancement and led to numerous significant discoveries. The supervision of veterinarians in the realm of in vivo research holds immense importance. However, this particular aspect of veterinary medicine, distinct from their [...] Read more.
Animal experiments, despite their controversial nature, play an indispensable role in scientific advancement and led to numerous significant discoveries. The supervision of veterinarians in the realm of in vivo research holds immense importance. However, this particular aspect of veterinary medicine, distinct from their other activities, can pose ethical challenges. Veterinarians are entrusted with the prevention of diseases, healing, and pain elimination, yet in the case of animal experiments, they witness intentional suffering and death. This article evaluates the ethical and professional deontological aspects of this issue. It explores the historical evolution of human–animal (including experimental) relationships and discusses how deontology stems from the definition of ethics. The article also examines codes of ethics for veterinarians, providing illustrative examples. It highlights that the actions of veterinarians in this domain align with their deontology and emphasises the role of veterinarians in in vivo research as viewed within current legal frameworks. In conclusion, the veterinarian’s participation in animal research is both ethically and deontologically justified, and it is also a legal requirement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession)
8 pages, 1034 KiB  
Article
The Role of Comparative Psychology in the Training of Veterinarians
by Brooke A. Boughton and Charles I. Abramson
Animals 2023, 13(14), 2315; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13142315 - 14 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1193
Abstract
This article highlights some of the advantages that comparative psychology offers the veterinary student and veterinary education generally. Comparative psychology is the oldest of the social sciences and, as such, has accumulated over three centuries of experience in such areas as research design, [...] Read more.
This article highlights some of the advantages that comparative psychology offers the veterinary student and veterinary education generally. Comparative psychology is the oldest of the social sciences and, as such, has accumulated over three centuries of experience in such areas as research design, animal–human interactions, and animal behavior. To establish whether comparative psychology is taught in veterinary schools, we survey all course catalogs of U.S. veterinary schools. None of the schools surveyed offered a course in comparative psychology, and inconsistencies were noted among the schools in regard to courses in animal–human interaction, animal behavior, and ethics. Suggestions are provided on how to incorporate principles of comparative psychology in veterinary education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession)
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16 pages, 347 KiB  
Article
Veterinary Expert: Legal Nature and Responsibility
by Andrzej Dzikowski
Animals 2023, 13(13), 2163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13132163 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1036
Abstract
Veterinary professional practice can be performed in many forms, including expert activity. The importance of veterinary expertise is, however, often underrated and limited to only one of its areas. Nonetheless, veterinary expert opinions have significant social, legal, and economic impacts. This study investigates [...] Read more.
Veterinary professional practice can be performed in many forms, including expert activity. The importance of veterinary expertise is, however, often underrated and limited to only one of its areas. Nonetheless, veterinary expert opinions have significant social, legal, and economic impacts. This study investigates veterinary expertise from an interdisciplinary, comparative perspective. Ethical and legal analysis and interpretation are performed. Essential concepts and relevant aspects of veterinary expertise are analysed. Legally relevant factors of an expert opinion are identified. The relationship between the law, the language, and the understanding of the role and duties of a veterinary proficient is demonstrated. A variety of possible expert opinions and the multiplicity of veterinary scopes of such activity is presented. It is argued that the ranges of forensic veterinary medicine and of veterinary expertise are broader than is predominantly assumed. Veterinary forensic medicine is a crucial part of veterinary specialisation. Ethical and legal basics, and the scope of veterinary expert’s liability, are revealed and discussed. The conclusion is that the duties and responsibilities of expert veterinarians are particularly great due to the exercise of the public trust profession, with large importance for the whole society. Their observance is, however, crucial to ensure the highest quality of expert opinions issued by veterinarians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession)
10 pages, 234 KiB  
Communication
Training in Honey Bee Veterinary Medicine in Italy: An Observational Study and Practical Proposals to Face Professional Challenges
by Carlo D’Ascenzi, Karen Power, Paola Maiolino and Michele Mortarino
Animals 2023, 13(11), 1795; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13111795 - 29 May 2023
Viewed by 1144
Abstract
Honey bees, like other livestock, may be affected by infectious, parasitic, and abiotic diseases that need proper sanitary monitoring and control. Currently, there are limited opportunities for undergraduate students to receive education in Honey Bee Veterinary Medicine (HBVM) as part of their regular [...] Read more.
Honey bees, like other livestock, may be affected by infectious, parasitic, and abiotic diseases that need proper sanitary monitoring and control. Currently, there are limited opportunities for undergraduate students to receive education in Honey Bee Veterinary Medicine (HBVM) as part of their regular degree program, despite the professional requirements for veterinarians to carry out the increasing tasks related to honey bee health and production. Additionally, postgraduate training and specialization in HBVM is also underdeveloped. This study was an observational survey that evaluated the educational opportunities available in HBVM for current and future veterinarians in Italy. The survey analyzed both undergraduate and postgraduate programs, including Undergraduate Degree Programs in Veterinary Medicine (UDPVM), “Scuole di Specializzazione”, Masters, and other postgraduate courses. The results indicate that the current training available for veterinarians in the field of apiculture, both before and after graduation, is also insufficient in Italy, as already reported in other EU- and extra-EU countries. Finally, a roadmap for veterinary training in HBVM is developed here describing objectives and teachings aimed at fulfilling the needs of the profession in the field of beekeeping, considering the existing rules and regulations governing public health and possible evolution of this legal framework in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Problems of Veterinary Education, Science and Profession)
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