Special Issue "Investigating the Dynamics, Risks and Control of Stray Animal Populations"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Lisa Collins

Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Animal health and welfare epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Countries globally are faced with the challenge of how to successfully control stray animal populations, such as stray cats and dogs. Stray animals can be seen as a nuisance, threatening public health through the spread of zoonotic diseases, and impacting on the conservation of other species. In addition, stray animals may experience poorer welfare themselves through a lack of resources, such as shelter, food and water. Different methods of stray population control include culling, sheltering and fertility control. In recent years, fertility control through trap-neuter-return has become a popular method of controlling both stray cat and dog populations. This method has been used with the aim to reduce stray animal numbers, improve stray animal health and reduce the risk of disease transmission to both humans and other species. However, the sustainability, efficiency and effectiveness of trap-neuter-return and other methods of fertility control require consideration. In particular, the impact of trap-neuter-return on the stray population size, public health risk, public perception, environmental impact and animal welfare needs to be assessed in order to determine whether the method is effective and efficient in achieving its goal. Moreover, it is important to determine the long-term sustainability of the trap-neuter-return method.

For this Special Issue, we invite original research papers and frontier review articles relating to the sustainability, efficiency and effectiveness of trap-neuter-return and other methods as a control strategy for stray population numbers, zoonotic disease transmission, public perception, animal health and welfare, economics and environmental impacts.

Prof. Lisa Collins
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stray animals
  • stray cat
  • stray dog
  • population management
  • population dynamics
  • trap-neuter-return
  • catch-neuter-return
  • fertility control
  • impact assessment
  • sustainability assessment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
A Case of Letting the Cat out of The Bag—Why Trap-Neuter-Return Is Not an Ethical Solution for Stray Cat (Felis catus) Management
Animals 2019, 9(4), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040171
Received: 18 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1973 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) programs, in which stray cats are captured, neutered and returned to the environment are advocated as a humane, ethical alternative to euthanasia. We review the TNR literature in light of current debate over whether or not there should be further TNR [...] Read more.
Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) programs, in which stray cats are captured, neutered and returned to the environment are advocated as a humane, ethical alternative to euthanasia. We review the TNR literature in light of current debate over whether or not there should be further TNR trials in Australia. We revisit the problems arising from stray cats living in association with human habitation and estimate how many stray cats would have to be processed through a scientifically-guided TNR program to avoid high euthanasia rates. We also identify 10 ethical and welfare challenges that have to be addressed: we consider the quality of life for stray cats, where they would live, whether the TNR process itself is stressful, whether TNR cats are vulnerable to injury, parasites and disease, can be medically treated, stray cats’ body condition and diet, and their impacts on people, pet cats, and urban wildlife, especially endemic fauna. We conclude that TNR is unsuitable for Australia in almost all situations because it is unlikely to resolve problems caused by stray cats or meet ethical and welfare challenges. Targeted adoption, early-age desexing, community education initiatives and responsible pet ownership have greater promise to minimize euthanasia, reduce numbers rapidly, and address the identified issues. Full article
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