Canine and Feline Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2023) | Viewed by 3137

Special Issue Editors

Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia, Bologna, Italy
Interests: regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stromal cells; cryopreservation; animal reproduction; fertility; assisted reproductive techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia, Bologna, Italy
Interests: mesenchymal stromal cells; veterinary cell therapy; assisted reproduction; cell banking; animal reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decade, significant interest related to stem cell therapies has arisen in veterinary medicine, particularly for small companion animals. Generally, dogs and cats are considered excellent models not just for human disease, but also for canine and feline endangered species. It has become evident that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell-based therapies due to their immunomodulatory properties, including paracrine action, apoptosis mediated immunomodulation, secretion of extracellular vesicles, and mitochondrial transfer of membrane vesicles and organelles. MSCs have been isolated from various tissues; adipose tissue is commonly considered the most attractive source of MSCs because of a large cell yield and minimally invasive procedure needed for sample collection. We are pleased to invite original research papers and reviews that will advance the knowledge on canine and feline adipose tissue-derived stem cells, including characterization, differentiation, secretome analysis, and evidence-based clinical approaches. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Barbara Merlo
Prof. Dr. Eleonora Iacono
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • canine
  • feline
  • adipose tissue
  • mesenchymal stromal cells
  • regenerative medicine
  • cell therapy
  • secretome

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 3224 KiB  
Article
Autologous Platelet Lysate Is an Alternative to Fetal Bovine Serum for Canine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Differentiation
Animals 2023, 13(16), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13162655 - 17 Aug 2023
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Abstract
The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in regenerative medicine raises serious ethical and scientific concerns. We have cultured and differentiated the canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) in five different media combinations of autologous platelet lysate (A-PL) and FBS; consisting of 0% A-PL [...] Read more.
The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in regenerative medicine raises serious ethical and scientific concerns. We have cultured and differentiated the canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) in five different media combinations of autologous platelet lysate (A-PL) and FBS; consisting of 0% A-PL and 10% FBS (M-1), 2.5% A-PL and 7.5% FBS (M-2), 5% A-PL and 5% FBS (M-3), 7.5% A-PL and 2.5% FBS (M-4), and 10% A-PL and 0% FBS (M-5). The cMSCs were evaluated for their doubling time, differentiation efficiency, and expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, and PDGFRα. The mRNA expression of NT5E, THY1, ENG, PPARγ, FABP4, FAS, SP7, BGLAP, and SPP1 was also assessed. The results indicated non-significant differences in cellular proliferation/viability; positive expression of surface markers, and PDGFRα with substantial adipo/osteogenic differentiation. The expression of adipogenic (PPARγ, FABP4, FAS), and osteogenic (SP7, BGLAP, SPP1) genes were higher (p < 0.05) in the M5 group. In conclusion, A-PL in cMSCs culture did not negatively affect cellular proliferation and viability but also enhanced their genetic potential for multilineage differentiation. Our results indicate that A-PL can be used as an alternative for FBS to develop potent cMSCs under good manufacturing practice protocol for regenerative medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine and Feline Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine)
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12 pages, 1397 KiB  
Article
The Stromal Vascular Fraction from Canine Adipose Tissue Contains Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Subpopulations That Show Time-Dependent Adhesion to Cell Culture Plastic Vessels
Animals 2023, 13(7), 1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13071175 - 27 Mar 2023
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Abstract
Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are extensively studied in both human and veterinary medicine. Their isolation is usually performed by collagenase digestion followed by filtration and removal of nonadherent tissue remnants 48 h after seeding. We observed that waste tissue fragments contain cells [...] Read more.
Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are extensively studied in both human and veterinary medicine. Their isolation is usually performed by collagenase digestion followed by filtration and removal of nonadherent tissue remnants 48 h after seeding. We observed that waste tissue fragments contain cells that adhere belatedly to the plastic. We aimed to investigate their basic properties to speculate on the possible existence of MSC subpopulations. Adipose tissue from three dogs was enzymatically digested. Three cell populations that adhered to the culture plastic 48, 96, and 144 h after seeding were obtained. After expansion, they were analyzed by flow cytometry for MSC-positive (CD90, CD44, and CD29) and -negative (CD14, MHCII, and CD45) markers as well as for endothelial, pericyte, and smooth muscle cell markers (CD31, CD146, and alpha-SMA). Furthermore, cells were assessed for viability, doubling time, and trilineage differentiation ability. No significant differences were found between the three subpopulations. As a result, this procedure has proven to be a valuable method for dramatically improving MSCs yield. As a consequence of cell recovery optimization, the amount of tissue harvested could be reduced, and the time required to obtain sufficient cells for clinical applications could be shortened. Further studies are needed to uncover possible different functional properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine and Feline Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine)
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Review

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22 pages, 1241 KiB  
Review
Beyond Canine Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Transplantation: An Update on Their Secretome Characterization and Applications
Animals 2023, 13(22), 3571; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13223571 - 19 Nov 2023
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Abstract
A dog is a valuable animal model and concomitantly a pet for which advanced therapies are increasingly in demand. The characteristics of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have made cell therapy more clinically attractive. During the last decade, research on the MSC therapeutic effectiveness [...] Read more.
A dog is a valuable animal model and concomitantly a pet for which advanced therapies are increasingly in demand. The characteristics of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have made cell therapy more clinically attractive. During the last decade, research on the MSC therapeutic effectiveness has demonstrated that tissue regeneration is primarily mediated by paracrine factors, which are included under the name of secretome. Secretome is a mixture of soluble factors and a variety of extracellular vesicles. The use of secretome for therapeutic purposes could have some advantages compared to cell-based therapies, such as lower immunogenicity and easy manufacturing, manipulation, and storage. The conditioned medium and extracellular vesicles derived from MSCs have the potential to be employed as new treatments in veterinary medicine. This review provides an update on the state-of-the-art characterization and applications of canine adipose tissue-derived MSC secretome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Canine and Feline Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine)
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