Special Issue "Sunflower for the 21st Century – Omics Era and Changing Environment"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dragana Miladinović
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Guest Editor
Sunflower Department,Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Maksima Gorkog 30, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Dr. Leire Molinero-Ruiz
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Guest Editor
Department of Crop Protection, Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, CSIC, 14004 Cordoba, Spain
Interests: diversity of crop pathogens; early disease detection; field crops diseases; genetic resistance; integrated disease management; oomycetes; parasitic plants; phytopathology; soil-borne fungi
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sreten Terzić
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Guest Editor
Sunflower Department,Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Maksima Gorkog 30, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sunflower is the fifth most important edible oilseed crop in the world. Almost one-fourth of the total sunflower production is concentrated in European countries, in which sunflower is the second largest oil crop after rapeseed. Due to its good chance of withstanding different environmental stresses, as well as having low input requirements and good adaptability, sunflower has been proposed as a potential model crop for adaptation to a changing environment. Its future is related to potential for adaptation to climate change, but also to its competitiveness and attractiveness for producers, as a source of food and energy. In the future, it is expected that integrative approaches that combine -omics technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and phenomics) using bioinformatic tools will facilitate the identification of target genes and markers for complex traits and facilitate sunflower breeding and its adaptation to the changing environment.

This Special Issue focuses on the following topics: (i) genetic resources—investment for the future; (ii) breeding—new/old breeding goals and challenges; (iii) biotechnology and -omics—old problems, new tools; (iv) abiotic stress resistance—challenges of changing environment; (v) biotic stress resistance—new and emerging pests and diseases; (vi) broomrape—constant challenge; (vii) crop production and modeling—yield stability in changing environment; (viii) confectionery sunflower—emerging crop; (ix) seed, oil, and meal production and quality—new and old market demands, and (x) economy and market—trends and prospects.

The aim of this Special Issue “Sunflower for the 21st Century—-Omics Era and Changing Environment” is to compile the latest and the most prominent research activities of different groups working on sunflower, including communications presented at the 20th International Sunflower Conference, as well as to present the most up-to-date research results and to outline future prospects and possible new research directions of this important oil crop.

Dr. Dragana Miladinović
Dr. Leire Molinero-Ruiz
Dr. Sreten Terzić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sunflower
  • genetic resources
  • breeding
  • stress resistance
  • crop modeling
  • -omics
  • oil and meal
  • market
  • confectionary
  • diseases
  • broomrape

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sunflower Metabolites Involved in Resistance Mechanisms against Broomrape
Agronomy 2021, 11(3), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030501 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 407
Abstract
Several strategies have been proposed to control parasitic plants and these include biological control, the use of herbicides, and suicidal germination or trap crops. In the case of sunflower, the most effective solution is genetic resistance. Nevertheless, the use of resistant cultivars is [...] Read more.
Several strategies have been proposed to control parasitic plants and these include biological control, the use of herbicides, and suicidal germination or trap crops. In the case of sunflower, the most effective solution is genetic resistance. Nevertheless, the use of resistant cultivars is followed by the appearance of new and more virulent races of the parasite that overcome the existing sources of resistance. For this reason, it is necessary to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the resistant varieties. In this study, the presence of compounds involved in pre-attachment resistance mechanisms in sunflower varieties was analyzed. The production of stimulators of the germination of parasitic plant seeds and the concentration of the haustorial elongation inhibitor, scopoletin, were measured in exudates of resistant and susceptible sunflower varieties. It was found that dehydrocostuslactone and orobanchyl acetate are not involved in the resistance of the sunflower varieties studied. The results demonstrate that costunolide, heliolactone, and scopoletin are related to sunflower resistance. The sunflower varieties studied do not use all available options to fight parasitic plants. This could be one of the reasons that sunflower resistance is rapidly overcome by broomrape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sunflower for the 21st Century – Omics Era and Changing Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Updated Characterization of Races of Plasmopara halstedii and Entomopathogenic Fungi as Endophytes of Sunflower Plants in Axenic Culture
Agronomy 2021, 11(2), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11020268 - 31 Jan 2021
Viewed by 657
Abstract
The management of downy mildew (Plasmopara halstedii) in sunflower, is heavily dependent on genetic resistance, whilst entomopathogenic fungi (EF) can reduce other sunflower diseases. In this work, we characterized P. halstedii from Spain and other countries collected in the past few [...] Read more.
The management of downy mildew (Plasmopara halstedii) in sunflower, is heavily dependent on genetic resistance, whilst entomopathogenic fungi (EF) can reduce other sunflower diseases. In this work, we characterized P. halstedii from Spain and other countries collected in the past few years. Twenty-three races were identified (the most frequent in Spain being 310, 304, 705 and 715), with an increasing proportion of highly virulent races. Five isolates from countries other than Spain overcame the resistance in RHA-340. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of five EF against downy mildew and their effects on sunflower growth in axenic conditions. None of the entomopathogens reduced disease severity, nor did they have any effect on plant growth when applied together with P. halstedii. In contrast, three EF reduced some of the plant growth variables in the absence of the pathogen. Microbiological and molecular diagnostics suggest that the axenic system and the short experimental time used in this study did not favor the successful establishment of EF in the plants or their potential biocontrol effect. Our results show a shift in P. halstedii racial patterns and suggest that soil as a growth substrate and long infection times are needed for EF effectiveness against downy mildew. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sunflower for the 21st Century – Omics Era and Changing Environment)
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