Special Issue "Irrigation Strategies in Sustainable Agriculture"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Christos A. Dordas
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Agronomy, School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: response of plant to water stress; evaluation of genotypes in limited water availability; climate change; ecological intensification; sustainable utilization of resources; precision agriculture; phenotyping
Dr. Pantazis E. Georgiou
Website SciProfiles
Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of General and Agricultural Hydraulics and Land Reclamation, School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Environment, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: crop water requirements and irrigation scheduling; crop yield response to water; optimal design, efficiency and selection criteria for irrigation methods; surface and pressurized irrigation networks; pricing irrigation water; climate change; sustainable development goals (SDGs) and water management in agriculture; water footprint and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water availability is one of the most important problems in modern agriculture. Moreover, climate change and the related scenarios that are proposed show that water availability will be a serious problem for many countries in the next years, especially in countries where water resources are limited. The economic losses in the cultivation of most crops due to water stress are quite significant, and a better water management can help to conserve water and to use it more efficiently. This Special Issue calls for contributions on crop water requirements, response of crops to water deficiency, irrigation scheduling, and all practices that increase water productivity, such as advanced irrigation techniques, improved agronomic practices, optimized irrigation water management, selection of new crop genotypes, and many more. In addition, studies on optimal design, efficiency, and selection of irrigation methods, economic solutions, and policy measures for improving crop water productivity are also welcome.

Prof. Christos Dordas
Assoc. Prof. Pantazis E. Georgiou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable Water Management
  • Water Conservation
  • Water Scarcity and Climate Change
  • Crop Water Requirements and Irrigation Scheduling
  • Irrigation Methods and Practices
  • Irrigation Efficiency–Water Productivity
  • Water quality
  • Crop Yield and Water Consumption
  • Agronomic Practices
  • Smart Farming and Irrigation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Water Stress on the Physiological Characteristics of Five Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Cultivars
Agronomy 2020, 10(7), 1029; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10071029 - 16 Jul 2020
Abstract
Water stress in one of the most important abiotic stresses that affects the productivity of many crop species worldwide. In addition, the climate change creates new challenges for crop adaptation especially as water resources become limited and the increase in water stress becomes [...] Read more.
Water stress in one of the most important abiotic stresses that affects the productivity of many crop species worldwide. In addition, the climate change creates new challenges for crop adaptation especially as water resources become limited and the increase in water stress becomes more pronounced even in areas where there is adequate water supply. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of water stress on physiological characteristics of five cultivars of basil under field conditions. Water stress affected leaf temperature, dry herb yield, leaf water potential, assimilation rate and gas exchange parameters, quantum yield, instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE), and essential oil content. From the physiological characteristics water potential and assimilation rate can be used for the selection of basil cultivars tolerant to water stress. In addition, essential oil content was lower under water stress indicating that essential oil content is correlated with water availability. From the present study it is obvious that there are tolerant basil cultivars to water stress and can be found using physiological traits such as water potential and assimilation rate and can be used to save and use water more sustainable and also conserve the water resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Irrigation Strategies in Sustainable Agriculture)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Implementing Sustainable Irrigation in Water-Scarce Regions under the Impact of Climate Change
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081120 - 01 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The sustainability of irrigated agriculture is threatening due to adverse climate change, given future projections that every one in four people on Earth might be suffering from extreme water scarcity by the year 2025. Pressurized irrigation systems and appropriate irrigation schedules can increase [...] Read more.
The sustainability of irrigated agriculture is threatening due to adverse climate change, given future projections that every one in four people on Earth might be suffering from extreme water scarcity by the year 2025. Pressurized irrigation systems and appropriate irrigation schedules can increase water productivity (i.e., product yield per unit volume of water consumed by the crop) and reduce the evaporative or system loss of water as opposed to traditional surface irrigation methods. However, in water-scarce countries, irrigation management frequently becomes a complex task. Deficit irrigation and the use of non-conventional water resources (e.g., wastewater, brackish groundwater) has been adopted in many cases as part of a climate change mitigation measures to tackle the water poverty issue. Protected cultivation systems such as greenhouses or screenhouses equipped with artificial intelligence systems present another sustainable option for improving water productivity and may help to alleviate water scarcity in these countries. This article presents a comprehensive review of the literature, which deals with sustainable irrigation for open-field and protected cultivation systems under the impact of climatic change in vulnerable areas, including the Mediterranean region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Irrigation Strategies in Sustainable Agriculture)
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