Special Issue "Addressing Abiotic Stress Responses in Plants: Emerging Biotechniques from Laboratory to the Field"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Roel C. Rabara
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA
Interests: Functional genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, seed biology, plant genetic resources conservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Productivity in plant agriculture largely depends on the growth margins that translate to higher and bumper yields. Plants are particularly sensitive to extreme temperature fluctuations (heat, frost, and cold), water availability (flooding to no water supply), and toxicities due to sodium (salt intrusion, high salinity) and minerals (metal and metalloid), which are referred to as abiotic stresses in general. These stresses occur and are foretold to occur more often in the future due to environmental factors resulting from rapid and dramatic changes in the global climate. More so, these stresses have repercussions on the burgeoning demand of an ever-increasing global population for a secure and safe agriculture-based food supply.

As research in plant biotechnology makes advances, crops adapted to abiotic stressed environments are continually developed that can be sustainably and safely produced in environmentally-friendly agroecosystems. Through modern and novel biotechnology tools, research studies in developing broad-spectrum stress-tolerant plants adaptable to agro-ecological stressed-conditions continue to gain a foothold despite environmental uncertainties. These biotechniques include but are not limited to omics-based systems; genetic engineering and genome mapping; gene mining, cloning, and transfer and marker-assisted breeding; transgene pyramiding; and studies on physiological, molecular, and biochemical plant responses, including crosstalk among various molecular mechanisms while under abiotic stresses.

This Research Topic for a Special Issue serves as a compendium of studies about plants’ complex mechanisms involved in response to a single or combination of abiotic stresses using omics-based techniques and physiological, biochemical, molecular methods and other multisystem approaches. This issue also includes studies highlighting comparative results of laboratory, greenhouse and field experiments, as well as long-term studies on responses of field-established plants under multiple abiotic stress conditions. Original research, methods, reviews, mini-reviews, and opinion articles related to, but not exclusively limited to, the following topics below are welcome for submission.

  • Understanding the molecular bases of interaction among stresses, including physiological and biochemical expressions and systems biology approaches;
  • Establishment of experimental conditions that mimic field conditions exhibiting one, combinations of or multiple abiotic stresses;
  • Detection of processes and/or transductions of abiotic stress signals of plants as whole plant, its parts or at gene level;
  • Identification of key factors connecting abiotic stress responses and developmental processes;
  • Analyses of long-term studies on plant responses under a combination of or multiple abiotic stress field conditions;
  • Ecogeographic studies of genetic diversity of plants correlation to abiotic stress conditions.

Dr. Roel C. Rabara
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food security
  • Abiotic stress
  • Plant biotechnology
  • Molecular mechanisms
  • Genetic resources

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aluminum-Specific Upregulation of GmALS3 in the Shoots of Soybeans: A Potential Biomarker for Managing Soybean Production in Acidic Soil Regions
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1228; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091228 - 20 Aug 2020
Abstract
Aluminum (Al) toxicity in acidic soils is a global agricultural problem that limits crop productivity through the inhibition of root growth. However, poor management associated with the application of soil acidity amendments such as lime (CaCO3) in certain crop types can [...] Read more.
Aluminum (Al) toxicity in acidic soils is a global agricultural problem that limits crop productivity through the inhibition of root growth. However, poor management associated with the application of soil acidity amendments such as lime (CaCO3) in certain crop types can pose a threat to low-input farming practices. Accordingly, it is important to develop appropriate techniques for the management of crop production in acidic soils. In this study, we identified ALS3 (ALUMINUM SENSITIVE 3) in soybeans (Glycine max, cultivar Toyomasari), which is highly expressed in the shoot under Al stress. GmALS3 (Glyma.10G047100) expression was found to be Al-specific under various stress conditions. We analyzed GmALS3 expression in the shoots of soybean plants grown in two different types of acidic soils (artificial and natural acidic soil) with different levels of liming and found that GmALS3 expression was suppressed with levels of liming that have been shown to eliminate soil Al3+ toxicity. Using soybeans as a model, we identified a potential biomarker that could indicate Al toxicity and appropriate liming levels for soybeans cultivated in acidic soils. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Adaptation to Water and Salt Stresses of Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1169; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081169 - 10 Aug 2020
Abstract
Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme represent a valuable tool for tomato breeding, particularly for tolerance to abiotic stresses. Water stress and salinity are major constraints to tomato’s cultivation, and for which limited genetic variability has been reported within the cultivated species. [...] Read more.
Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme represent a valuable tool for tomato breeding, particularly for tolerance to abiotic stresses. Water stress and salinity are major constraints to tomato’s cultivation, and for which limited genetic variability has been reported within the cultivated species. We evaluated four accessions of S. pimpinellifolium and four of S. l. var. cerasiforme for their adaptation to water deficit and salinity. The CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, substomatal CO2 concentration, transpiration rate, and leaf chlorophyll concentration were evaluated, as well as morphological and agronomic traits. The accessions showed a remarkable inter- and intra-species response variability to both stresses. Two S. pimpinellifolium accessions and one S. l. var. cerasiforme showed unaltered physiological parameters, thus indicating a good adaptation to water deficit. Two S. l. var. cerasiforme accessions showed an interesting performance under salt stress, one of which showing also good adaptation to water stress. In general, both stresses showed a negative impact on leaf size and fruit fresh weight, especially in the big-sized fruits. However, flowering, fruit setting and earliness remained unaltered or even improved when compared to control conditions. Stressed plants yielded fruits with higher ° Brix. Response to stresses seemed to be linked to origin environmental conditions, notwithstanding, variability was observed among accessions of the same region. Full article
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