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Open AccessArticle

Adaptation to Water and Salt Stresses of Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme

1
Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA), CV-315, Km 10.7, 46113 Moncada, Valencia, Spain
2
Instituto Universitario de Conservación y Mejora de la Agrodiversidad Valenciana (COMAV), Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1169; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081169
Received: 25 June 2020 / Revised: 4 August 2020 / Accepted: 6 August 2020 / Published: 10 August 2020
Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme represent a valuable tool for tomato breeding, particularly for tolerance to abiotic stresses. Water stress and salinity are major constraints to tomato’s cultivation, and for which limited genetic variability has been reported within the cultivated species. We evaluated four accessions of S. pimpinellifolium and four of S. l. var. cerasiforme for their adaptation to water deficit and salinity. The CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, substomatal CO2 concentration, transpiration rate, and leaf chlorophyll concentration were evaluated, as well as morphological and agronomic traits. The accessions showed a remarkable inter- and intra-species response variability to both stresses. Two S. pimpinellifolium accessions and one S. l. var. cerasiforme showed unaltered physiological parameters, thus indicating a good adaptation to water deficit. Two S. l. var. cerasiforme accessions showed an interesting performance under salt stress, one of which showing also good adaptation to water stress. In general, both stresses showed a negative impact on leaf size and fruit fresh weight, especially in the big-sized fruits. However, flowering, fruit setting and earliness remained unaltered or even improved when compared to control conditions. Stressed plants yielded fruits with higher ° Brix. Response to stresses seemed to be linked to origin environmental conditions, notwithstanding, variability was observed among accessions of the same region. View Full-Text
Keywords: abiotic stress; gas exchange; phenotyping; tomato wild relatives; salinity; Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) chlorophyll measurement; water deficit abiotic stress; gas exchange; phenotyping; tomato wild relatives; salinity; Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) chlorophyll measurement; water deficit
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Martínez-Cuenca, M.-R.; Pereira-Dias, L.; Soler, S.; López-Serrano, L.; Alonso, D.; Calatayud, Á.; Díez, M.J. Adaptation to Water and Salt Stresses of Solanum pimpinellifolium and Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1169.

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