Special Issue "Effects of Abiotic Stresses and Their Control on Quality of Horticultural Products"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Daniela Romano
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, 95124 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: ornamental plants; abiotic stresses; antioxidant enzymes; biodiversity; product quality; germination; light response; postharvest
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Juan A. Fernández
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, 20203 Cartagena, Spain
Interests: vegetable crops; protected cultivation; cultivation techniques; soilless culture; vegetable grafting; plant genetic resources; abiotic stress
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cola
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Milan, 20122 Milano MI, Italy
Interests: environmental impact assessment; crop management; plant physiology; environment; modeling; remote sensing; soil and water conservation; water resources management; prediction; climate change; environmental resources and limitations for crop growth; agrometeorology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Abiotic stresses can negatively affect the quality of horticultural crops. Their effects depend on the type of stress, its intensity, and the duration of the stressful condition. However, abiotic stresses’ active primary and secondary metabolisms accumulate different bioactive compounds, which may also enhance some of the quality parameters of horticulture products. This Special Issue intends to summarize the recent knowledge in agronomic management strategies to detect and reduce abiotic stress effects on horticultural crops. Particular attention is paid to the use of mild abiotic stresses in pre- and postharvest conditions for enhancing and preserving the quality of products.

The quality of horticultural products is the result of the interaction of different factors, including a grower’s crop management ability, genotypes, and the environment. In particular, adverse environmental conditions and hence abiotic stresses may greatly affect product quality. Abiotic stress, such as cold, heat, drought, flooding, salinity, nutrient deficiency, heavy metals, ozone, and ultraviolet radiation affect multiple physiological and biochemical mechanisms in plants and hence influence the characteristics of horticultural products. In this context, producers of horticultural crops are continually developing new, innovative agricultural practices with the aim of achieving more efficient and sustainable production for the early detection and counteraction of abiotic stress effects and the preservation of crop productivity.

This Special Issue has been planned to collect a wide spectrum of studies focused on the effects of abiotic stresses on horticulture production. Therefore, basic and applied research papers, and specific reviews on specific abiotic stress or crops, are welcome. Our wish is to provide an updated and qualified state of the art on this topic, which can represent a good source of information for ambitious research studies in the future.

Prof. Daniela Romano
Prof. Dr. Juan A. Fernández
Dr. Gabriele Cola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agronomic tools
  • plant metabolism
  • post-harvest
  • cold
  • heat
  • water stress
  • light stress
  • salinity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Moderately-Reduced Water Supply and Picking Time on the Chemical Composition of Pickling Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in Open Field Cultivation
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1097; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081097 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
As climate change evokes changing precipitation patterns, the cultivation of vegetable crops in open fields might become more difficult in the future. Nowadays, many vegetable growers are already facing relatively long unprecedented precipitation-free periods. In many growing regions, irrigation is only available to [...] Read more.
As climate change evokes changing precipitation patterns, the cultivation of vegetable crops in open fields might become more difficult in the future. Nowadays, many vegetable growers are already facing relatively long unprecedented precipitation-free periods. In many growing regions, irrigation is only available to a limited extent or not at all, and the cultivated plants will suffer from moderate water stress more often. Therefore, we examined the effects of moderately-reduced water supply on the chemical composition of pickling cucumber, cultivated in an open field and in a separate greenhouse trial. In the field trial, the reduced water supply treatment (RWS) provided 85–90% of the total water amount of the well-watered control treatment (CTR), applying a randomized block design with six replications comprising two consecutive weekly harvest periods. In fruits obtained by cultivation with reduced irrigation, levels of malic acid, calcium, and magnesium significantly increased, while those of phosphate, phosphorous, nitrogen, and iron decreased based on dry matter. Fresh matter-related results additionally revealed a decrease of myo-inositol and zinc, while sugars and total phenols remained unchanged. In the greenhouse experiment, the RWS obtained 60% of the irrigation amount of the CTR. Here, single cucumber compartments (exocarp, mesocarp, and endocarp) were examined. Chemical compositions changed in a similar, but more pronounced, manner as compared to the open field trial. The levels of individual, nutritionally relevant carotenoids in the peel of pickling cucumber, like lutein and β-carotene, were affected by RWS. Regarding the nutritional quality of fresh marketable cucumber fruits, malic acid, certain minerals and trace elements, as well as the carotenoids were shown to be sensitive to moderate water reduction. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Soil Salinity and Foliar Application of Jasmonic Acid on Mineral Balance of Carrot Plants Tolerant and Sensitive to Salt Stress
Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050659 - 07 May 2020
Abstract
The aim of the study is to determine the effects of soil salinity stress and foliar application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the mineral balance in plants of salt-sensitive doubled haploid carrot line (DH1) and salt-tolerant local DLBA variety (DLBA). Concentrations of 28 [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to determine the effects of soil salinity stress and foliar application of jasmonic acid (JA) on the mineral balance in plants of salt-sensitive doubled haploid carrot line (DH1) and salt-tolerant local DLBA variety (DLBA). Concentrations of 28 elements were determined in roots and leaves and in the soil. The DcNHX4 gene (cation:proton exchange antiporter) expression was assessed. The salinity stress reduced the mass of roots and leaves more in DH1 than in DLBA. DLBA plants accumulated larger amounts of Na and Cl in the roots and had an increased transport of these elements to the leaves. The salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive carrot varieties differed in their ability to uptake and accumulate some elements, such as K, Mg, Zn, S, Cd, P and B, and this response was organ-specific. A selective uptake of K in the presence of high Na concentration was evident in the tolerant variety, and a high Na content in its leaves correlated with the expression of DcNHX4 gene, which was expressed in DLBA leaves only. JA application did not affect the growth of DLBA or DH1 plants. In the sensitive DH1 variety grown under salinity stress, JA induced changes in the mineral balance by limiting the uptake of the sum of all elements, especially Na and Cl, and by limiting Zn and Cd accumulation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Exogenous Spermidine on Root Metabolism of Cucumber Seedlings under Salt Stress by GC-MS
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040459 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
To investigate the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on metabolism changes under salt stress in cucumber roots, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was performed. The results showed that most of the 142 metabolites responded to salt stress or exogenous Spd treatment. Salt stress [...] Read more.
To investigate the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on metabolism changes under salt stress in cucumber roots, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was performed. The results showed that most of the 142 metabolites responded to salt stress or exogenous Spd treatment. Salt stress reduced carbon consumption, resulted in the transformation of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and meanwhile increased salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene synthesis, and, thus, inhibited the growth of seedlings. However, exogenous Spd further improved the utilization of carbon, the energy-saving pattern of amino acid accumulation, and the control of hydroxyl radicals. In conclusion, Spd could promote energy metabolism and inhibit SA and ethylene synthesis in favor of root growth that contributes to higher salt tolerance. This study provides insight that may facilitate a better understanding of the salt resistance by Spd in cucumber seedlings. Full article
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