Special Issue "Impact of Grazing on Sustainability of Rangelands under Changing Climate"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Grassland and Pasture Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zalmen Henkin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Newe Ya'ar Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization of Israel, Bet Dagan, Israel
Interests: range management; plant ecology
Dr. Eli Zaady
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources, Institute of Plant Sciences Agriculture Research Organization, Ministry of Agriculture, Gilat Research Center, Mobile Post Negev 8531100, Israel
Interests: open spaces; AgroEcologist; soil ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rangelands represent a dominant anthropogenic land use worldwide, making up ~25% of the uncultivated terrestrial land. The central goal of managing rangelands is to maximize the utilization of the forage resource for animal production. Now, however, ecological considerations also play an important role. As open landscapes around the world are subject to heavy grazing, questions are raised about animals’ impacts on the sustainability of the land. These include topics such as soil properties, soil microorganisms, vegetation composition, richness and diversity, wild animals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, and invertebrate groups.

Different grazing management systems are based on the livestock species, stocking rate, infrastructure, land tenure, and socioeconomic context. Increasing grazing intensity can reduce ecosystem resistance, and has a great effect on the ability of the system to recover, and as such large parts of the grazed landscapes have been degraded.

Current climate change models predict a rise in temperatures, a reduction in the number of rainy days, and a higher incidence of extreme events. The multiple effects of grazing and climate change on the sustainability of rangelands can take a negative direction. However, proper grazing management that takes into account all factors can lead to the sustainability of the ecosystems.

This Special Issue will deal with these topics. We welcome novel research articles, reviews, and opinion pieces covering all related issues.

Dr. Zalmen Henkin
Dr. Eli Zaady
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • range management
  • grassland and pasture science
  • climate change
  • pasture carrying capacity
  • plant–animal interface
  • production efficiency of rangeland
  • soil and plant nutrition
  • farming sustainability
  • forage yield and nutritive value

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Can Grazing Moderate Climatic Effects on Herbage Nutritional Quality?
Agronomy 2021, 11(4), 700; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11040700 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 413
Abstract
In Mediterranean grasslands, the composition of vegetation and its nutritional quality for animals are strongly affected by the climatic conditions prevailing during winter and spring. Therefore, these seasonal ecosystems provide an opportunity to examine how variability in climatic conditions affects the regeneration and [...] Read more.
In Mediterranean grasslands, the composition of vegetation and its nutritional quality for animals are strongly affected by the climatic conditions prevailing during winter and spring. Therefore, these seasonal ecosystems provide an opportunity to examine how variability in climatic conditions affects the regeneration and quality of pasture vegetation. The intensity of grazing in this seasonal system can moderate, or alternatively exacerbate, climatic effects on the nutritional quality of the vegetation. Herein, we analyzed the interactive effects of climate variables, grazing intensity, and grazing exclusion on herbage quality parameters using long-term vegetation and climate data collected during 2005–2018 from an extensive experiment in Galilee, Israel. We evaluated the contribution of different climate variables to the prediction of herbage quality parameters. Our results showed that climate variables have a dramatic effect on herbage quality and that this effect interacts with grazing intensity. Herbage quality improved in temperate rainy years compared to warm and dry years. High grazing intensity improved herbage quality under temperate climate conditions, but this effect was moderated or completely disappeared as winter conditions become warmer and drier. The results of the study foresee negative effects of warming and drying on the carrying capacity of natural pastures. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop