Advances in Soil Fertility, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1875

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Science, School of Agricultural and Veterinarian Sciences, São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, São Paulo 14884-900, Brazil
Interests: plant nutrition; silicon; mineral metabolism; nutritional disorder; soil science; nutrient imbalance; plant stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agrifood, Animals and Environmental Sciences, Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando 3070000, Chile
Interests: soil fertility; plant nutrition; silicon; plant stress; biofertilizers; water management; climate change

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Maranhão, Chapadinha 65500-000, Brazil
Interests: grass and forage science; silage
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Worldwide, climate change poses significant challenges to soil fertility and plant nutrition, with profound implications for food security and agricultural sustainability. Understanding how to improve soil fertility and plant nutrition is crucial for efficient, sustainable, and future-oriented agriculture, ensuring sufficient, high-quality food production while protecting the environment. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) the following: novel approaches for assessing soil fertility levels; innovative soil management techniques to enhance nutrient availability; the impact of soil amendments on soil fertility and plant nutrition; strategies for optimizing nutrient uptake and utilization by plants; the role of microbial communities in soil fertility and nutrient cycling; sustainable practices for improving soil health and fertility; integration of precision agriculture technologies for efficient nutrient management; and the effects of environmental factors on soil fertility and plant nutrition. Moreover, it seeks to advance our understanding of soil–plant interactions and provide valuable insights for sustainable agricultural practices and crop production. We welcome novel research, reviews, original articles, and communication covering all related topics. 

Dr. Renato De Mello Prado
Dr. Dilier Olivera Viciedo
Dr. Anderson De Moura Zanine
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil management
  • soil amendments
  • nutrient availability
  • nutrient use efficiency
  • microbial communities
  • sustainable agriculture
  • fertilization strategies
  • crop management practices

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 3997 KiB  
Article
Challenges in Mapping Soil Variability Using Apparent Soil Electrical Conductivity under Heterogeneous Topographic Conditions
by István Mihály Kulmány, László Bede, Dávid Stencinger, Sándor Zsebő, Péter Csavajda, Renátó Kalocsai, Márton Vona, Gergely Jakab, Viktória Margit Vona and Ákos Bede-Fazekas
Agronomy 2024, 14(6), 1161; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14061161 - 29 May 2024
Viewed by 464
Abstract
Site-specific management requires the identification of treatment areas based on homogeneous characteristics. This study aimed to determine whether soil mapping based on apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is suitable for mapping soil properties of fields with topographic heterogeneity. Research was conducted [...] Read more.
Site-specific management requires the identification of treatment areas based on homogeneous characteristics. This study aimed to determine whether soil mapping based on apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is suitable for mapping soil properties of fields with topographic heterogeneity. Research was conducted on two neighbouring fields in Fejér county, Hungary, with contrasting topographic heterogeneity. To characterise the spatial variability of soil attributes, ECa was measured and supplemented by obtaining soil samples and performing soil profile analysis. The relationship between ECa and soil physical and chemical properties was analysed using correlation, principal component, and regression analyses. The research revealed that the quality and strength of the relationship between ECa and soil remarkably differed in the two studied fields. In homogeneous topographic conditions, ECa was weakly correlated with elevation as determined by soil physical texture and nutrient content in a strong (R2 = 0.72) linear model. On the other hand, ECa was significantly determined by elevation in heterogeneous topographic conditions in a moderate (R2 = 0.47) linear model. Consequently, ECa-based soil mapping can only be used to characterise the soil, thus delineating management zones under homogeneous topographic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Soil Fertility, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 4017 KiB  
Article
Continuous Intercropping Increases the Depletion of Soil Available and Non-Labile Phosphorus
by Jianyang He, Jun He, Haiye Li, Yumei Yu, Ling Qian, Li Tang, Yi Zheng and Jingxiu Xiao
Agronomy 2024, 14(6), 1121; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14061121 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 316
Abstract
Background and aims: This research aimed to evaluate the effects of consecutive intercropping on soil phosphorus (P) partitioning, concentrations, and sensitivity to P fertilizer application, elucidating its impact on soil P bioavailability. Methods: A field experiment investigated soil P fractions and [...] Read more.
Background and aims: This research aimed to evaluate the effects of consecutive intercropping on soil phosphorus (P) partitioning, concentrations, and sensitivity to P fertilizer application, elucidating its impact on soil P bioavailability. Methods: A field experiment investigated soil P fractions and content under continuous wheat and faba bean intercropping. Three P levels (0, 45, and 90 kg P2O5 ha−1 denoted as P0, P1, and P2, respectively) and three planting patterns (monocropped wheat (MW), monocropped faba bean (MF), and wheat and faba bean intercropping (W//F)) were established since 2014. Aboveground P uptake by wheat and faba bean was determined. The soil P fractions and content were analyzed after six-, seven-, and eight-year continuous field experiments. Results: Wheat and faba bean intercropping increased wheat aboveground P uptake by 28.3–42.7% compared to MW under P1 and P2 levels and presented a P uptake advantage (LERPuptake > 1), although W//F had no impact on faba bean P uptake. Consequently, continuous intercropping for 8 years decreased soil available P reserves by 9.0–23.4% in comparison to the weighted average value of MW and MF (It). Faba bean consumed greater non-labile and labile P than wheat with low P input. W//F had nearly no impact on the labile P pool but reduced the non-labile P pool by 5.0–12.1% under all P levels and lowered the moderately labile P pool by 1.7–4.7% at P0 and P1 levels compared to It with consecutive intercropping for 8 years. Consecutive intercropping of wheat and faba bean primarily decreased the proportion of Resin-P in the labile P pool and the proportion of Residual-P in the non-labile P pool. According to the structural equation model, crop P uptake mainly originated from soil available P, which was directly affected by non-labile P (Residual-P and Conc. HCl-P). In addition, intercropping changed the contribution of each P faction to crop P uptake compared to MW and MF, and P uptake in intercropping primarily depended on Conc. HCl- P and Dil. HCl-P. Therefore, consecutive intercropping decreased soil non-labile P and drove soil available P depletion, and intercropping’s increase of P uptake was related to the non-labile P mobilized to moderately labile and labile P. Conclusions: Continuous wheat and faba bean intercropping reduced non-labile P and led to soil available P depletion under low P input. This practice stimulated non-labile P mobilization, enhancing soil P fraction effectiveness and facilitating P uptake in intercropping. Continuous intercropping of wheat and faba bean is as an effective method to maximize the biological availability of soil P and reduce P application rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Soil Fertility, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 4869 KiB  
Article
Nanoparticles of Zinc Oxides Mitigated N2O Emissions in Tea Plantation Soil
by Jing Wang, Linfang Guo, Fengmin Yang, Jian Xiang, Lizhi Long and Kang Ni
Agronomy 2024, 14(6), 1113; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14061113 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 272
Abstract
The excessive application of nitrogen in tea plantations leads to severe soil acidification and N2O emission boosting. To promote sustainable agriculture, nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as alternative fertilizers, but their effects on soil nitrification and greenhouse gas emissions in tea plantations [...] Read more.
The excessive application of nitrogen in tea plantations leads to severe soil acidification and N2O emission boosting. To promote sustainable agriculture, nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as alternative fertilizers, but their effects on soil nitrification and greenhouse gas emissions in tea plantations remain unclear. In this study, the effects of NP type (ZnO-NPs and Fe2O3-NPs) and dose (0, 1, 10, and 100 mg·kg⁻1) on soil N2O emissions were investigated via a lab incubation trial. Soil pH, ammonium, and nitrate changes were also monitored during the incubation period. The abundance of functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification processes was analyzed as well. The results showed that ZnO-NPs led to a decrease in N2O emissions. The reduction effect was stronger with increasing dose and resulted in a 33% reduction at an addition rate of 100 mg·kg−1. The cumulative N2O emissions had significantly positive correlations with NH4+-N and NO3-N. ZnO-NP addition showed a significantly negative effect on Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) but a positive effect on Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) gene abundance. In contrast, Fe2O3-NPs showed an insignificant impact on N2O emissions and soil N content, as well as nitrification–denitrification gene abundance, regardless of different doses. These results imply that the application of ZnO-NPs may inhibit nitrification through the retarding of AOA activity. This study provided us with a potential practice to reduce N2O emissions in tea plantations by applying ZnO-NPs, but the efficiency of this reduction needs further examination under ambient conditions before field application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Soil Fertility, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management)
13 pages, 1148 KiB  
Article
Silicon-Mediated Adjustments in C:N:P Ratios for Improved Beetroot Yield under Ammonium-Induced Stress
by Dilier Olivera-Viciedo, Daimy Salas Aguilar, Renato de Mello Prado, Kolima Peña Calzada, Alexander Calero Hurtado, Marisa de Cássia Piccolo, Mariana Bomfim Soares, Rodolfo Lizcano Toledo, Guilherme Ribeiro Alves, Daniele Ferreira, Rosane Rodrigues and Anderson de Moura Zanine
Agronomy 2024, 14(6), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14061104 - 22 May 2024
Viewed by 438
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) holds a prominent position in the metabolic system of plants, as it is a main constituent of amino acids, which are the basic building blocks of proteins and enzymes. Plants primarily absorb N in the form of ammonium (NH4+ [...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) holds a prominent position in the metabolic system of plants, as it is a main constituent of amino acids, which are the basic building blocks of proteins and enzymes. Plants primarily absorb N in the form of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3). However, most plants exhibit severe toxicity symptoms when exposed to NH4+ as the sole N source. Addressing NH4+ stress requires effective strategies, and the use of silicon (Si) has shown promising results. However, there is a lack of underlying studies on the impact of NH4+ toxicity on C:N:P stoichiometric balance and the role of Si in these ratios. In this study, we explored the effects of varying NH4+ concentrations (1, 7.5, 15, 22.5, and 30 mmol L−1) on the C:N:P stoichiometry and yield of beetroot in hydroponic conditions. Additionally, we investigated whether the application of Si (2 mmol L−1) could mitigate the detrimental effects caused by toxic NH4+ levels. The experiment followed a randomized block design based on a 5 × 2 factorial scheme with four replicates. Results revealed that in the presence of Si, both [N] and [P] significantly increased in shoots and roots, peaking at 15 mmol L−1 of NH4+ in the nutrient solution. While shoot [C] remained stable, root [C] increased with NH4+ concentrations of 22.5 and 30 mmol L−1, respectively. Moreover, shoot and root [Si] increased with higher NH4+ levels in the nutrient solution. The findings underscored homeostatic instability under the highest NH4+ levels, particularly in plants cultivated without Si in the nutritive solution, leading to a reduction in both shoot and root dry matter production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Soil Fertility, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management)
Back to TopTop