Special Issue "Single Event Effect Prediction in Avionics"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Laurent Artola
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics Instrumentation Environment and Space (ONERA/DPHY), Université de Toulouse, F-31055 Toulouse, France
Interests: electronic reliability; single event effects; radiation effects; semiconductor device; modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of the uses of microelectronic circuits, also called avionics, on board aircrafts and spacecrafts has been gaining momentum in recent years. These advanced systems perform various functions, including communication, navigation, flight control, display systems, flight management, etc. There is a great need for advanced avionics in civil, military and space systems. In space, heavy ions, protons, even electrons issued from cosmic rays, solar flares, radiation belts are strong constraints for the reliability (especially Single Event Effects (SEE)) of avionics during a space mission. In the Earth’s atmosphere, primary comic rays interact with the nuclei of atmospheric gases, creating cascades of secondary particles including neutrons, protons, pions, and muons. In addition to space applications, and because of the strong integration of technologies used for microelectronics circuits, SEE risks are a growing concern for atmospheric and ground applications.

This Special Issue on "Single Event Effects Prediction in Avionics"; will solicit review and original articles on the developments of SEE modeling and prediction methodologies that tackle this important topic. In order to provide a dedicated focus, articles that address the evaluation of the practical issues, such as SEE sensitivity trends with technology roadmaps, on-board testing, and prediction tools for hardening through design, are welcome.

Dr. Laurent Artola
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Single Event Effects Prediction tools
  • SEE estimations of avionics in aircrafts
  • SEE estimations of avionics in spacecrafts
  • SEE estimations of avionics in satellites
  • On-board testing
  • Methodologies for SEE in-flight prediction from ground testing
  • Roadmap of the SEE sensitivity of incoming technologies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Heavy Ion Induced Single Event Effects Characterization on an RF-Agile Transceiver for Flexible Multi-Band Radio Systems in NewSpace Avionics
Aerospace 2020, 7(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7020014 - 09 Feb 2020
Abstract
Nowadays, technologies have a massive impact on the design of avionic systems, even for the conservative space industry. In this paper, the single event effect (SEE) characterization of a highly integrated and radio frequency (RF) agile transceiver is being presented which is an [...] Read more.
Nowadays, technologies have a massive impact on the design of avionic systems, even for the conservative space industry. In this paper, the single event effect (SEE) characterization of a highly integrated and radio frequency (RF) agile transceiver is being presented which is an outstanding candidate for future radio systems in NewSpace applications and space avionics. The device being investigated allows programmable re-configuration of RF specifications, where classical software-defined radios (SDR) only define an on-demand re-configuration of the signal processing. RF related configurations are untouched for common SDR and developed discretely by the specific application requirements. Due to the high integrity and complexity of the device under test (DUT), state-of-the-art radiation test procedures are not applicable and customized testing procedures need to be developed. The DUT shows a very robust response to linear energy transfer (LET) values up to 62.5 MeV.cm²/mg, without any destructives events and a moderate soft error rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Single Event Effect Prediction in Avionics)
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Open AccessArticle
Mitigation and Predictive Assessment of SET Immunity of Digital Logic Circuits for Space Missions
Aerospace 2020, 7(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7020012 - 05 Feb 2020
Abstract
Due to the intrinsic masking effects of combinational circuits in digital designs, Single-Event Transient (SET) effects were considered irrelevant compared to the data rupture caused by Single-Event Upset (SEU) effects. However, the importance of considering SET in Very-Large-System-Integration (VLSI) circuits increases given the [...] Read more.
Due to the intrinsic masking effects of combinational circuits in digital designs, Single-Event Transient (SET) effects were considered irrelevant compared to the data rupture caused by Single-Event Upset (SEU) effects. However, the importance of considering SET in Very-Large-System-Integration (VLSI) circuits increases given the reduction of the transistor dimensions and the logic data path depth in advanced technology nodes. Accordingly, the threat of SET in electronics systems for space applications must be carefully addressed along with the SEU characterization. In this work, a systematic prediction methodology to assess and improve the SET immunity of digital circuits is presented. Further, the applicability to full-custom and cell-based design methodologies are discussed, and an analysis based on signal probability and pin assignment is proposed to achieve a more application-efficient SET-aware optimization of synthesized circuits. For instance, a SET-aware pin assignment can provide a reduction of 37% and 16% on the SET rate of a NOR gate for a Geostationary Orbit (GEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) orbit, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Single Event Effect Prediction in Avionics)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Energy Dependence on Ground Level and Avionic SEE Rate Prediction When Applying Standard Test Procedures
Aerospace 2019, 6(11), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6110119 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Single event effects (SEEs) in ground level and avionic applications are mainly induced by neutrons and protons, of which the relative contribution of the latter is larger with increasing altitude. Currently, there are two main applicable standards—JEDEC JESD89A for ground level and IEC [...] Read more.
Single event effects (SEEs) in ground level and avionic applications are mainly induced by neutrons and protons, of which the relative contribution of the latter is larger with increasing altitude. Currently, there are two main applicable standards—JEDEC JESD89A for ground level and IEC 62396 for avionics—that address the procedure for testing and qualifying electronics for these environments. In this work, we extracted terrestrial spectra at different altitudes from simulations and compared them with data available from the standards. Second, we computed the SEE rate using different approaches for three static random access memory (SRAM) types, which present a strong SEE response dependence with energy. Due to the presence of tungsten, a fissile material when interacting with high energy hadrons, the neutron and proton SEE cross sections do not saturate after 200 MeV, but still increase up to several GeV. For these memories, we found standard procedures could underestimate the SEE rate by a factor of up to 4-even in ground level applications—and up to 12 times at 12 km. Moreover, for such memories, the contribution from high energy protons is able to play a significant role, comparable to that of neutrons, even at commercial flight altitudes, and greater at higher altitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Single Event Effect Prediction in Avionics)
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Open AccessArticle
In-Situ Testing of a Multi-Band Software-Defined Radio Platform in a Mixed-Field Irradiation Environment
Aerospace 2019, 6(10), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6100106 - 24 Sep 2019
Abstract
This paper presents an in-situ test concept for a multi-band software-defined radio (SDR) platform in a mixed-field radiation environment. Special focus is given to the complex automated test setup with respect to the requirements of the irradiation facility. Additionally, selected test results of [...] Read more.
This paper presents an in-situ test concept for a multi-band software-defined radio (SDR) platform in a mixed-field radiation environment. Special focus is given to the complex automated test setup with respect to the requirements of the irradiation facility. Additionally, selected test results of a system-level evaluation are presented and discussed. For the verification of the mixed-field radiation environment, the software-defined radio (SDR) was also tested under proton irradiation. The cross-sections for the observed single event effects are compared and show similar results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Single Event Effect Prediction in Avionics)
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