Special Issue "Fluid Dynamic Measurement Technologies: Optical and Nanophotonic Methods"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Hossein Zare-Behtash
Website
Guest Editor
Aerospace Sciences Division, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland, UK
Interests: fluid–thermal–structure interactions; nanophotonic fluid sensor, flow control; compressible flows; advanced flow diagnostics; shock physics; shock–vortex interactions; wind tunnel testing; engineering optimisation; unsteady aerodynamics; energy deposition; bio-inspired engineering; unconventional wing planforms
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Esmaeil Heydari
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Physics, Kharazmi University, Tehran 1571914911, Iran
Interests: optofluidic biosensors; nano-engineered pressure sensors; optical dissolved-oxygen sensor; anti-counterfeiting labels; plasmonic nano-pixels; nanophotonic fluorescence enhancement; organic lasers; upconversion nanoparticles; plasmonic nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In order to optimise the performance of components interacting with fluids, be it in a gas or liquid, a turbine blade in an aircraft engine, or even a newly installed mechanical heart valve, we must first understand the interaction between the fluid and that component. To understand, we must first measure. Even when running purely numerical fluid dynamic simulations, we require data to validate our methodology and assumptions. Again, these data come from measurements. A famous quote by Lord Kelvin (June 26, 1824–December 17, 1907) summarises the important role of measurements in the advancement of science:

“When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely, in your thoughts advanced to the stage of science.”

Therefore, to measure and ultimately optimise our designs, we must develop and apply high-resolution measurement technologies that can bridge the current gap between numerical simulations and experimental testing through high sampling rates and fine resolutions. This will enable future breakthroughs in component performance whilst significantly reducing the costs and timescales associated with component development and testing.

The goal of this Special Issue is to bring together the state-of-the-art in fluidic measurement technologies and highlight the advancements that have been made in traditional/conventional approaches whilst also identifying areas with the greatest potential for future development. These advancements can be in the setup itself, novel ways of processing or post-processing data, or the introduction of new configurations to existing methods.

An area where submissions are strongly encouraged is that of optical and nano-engineered approaches such as PSP, TSP, and PIV with nanoparticles. This is a tremendously exciting and rapidly growing field of research. Incorporating nanoscale photonics into fluid flow measurements is a radical new approach that has the potential to redefine what is possible in flow diagnostics.

Dr. Hossein Zare-Behtash
Dr. Esmaeil Heydari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Laser induced fluorescence
  • Pressure and temperature sensitive paints
  • Liquid crystals
  • Optical interferometry
  • Optical tomography
  • Schlieren/shadowgraph
  • Particle image velocimetry
  • Fluid flow visualisation
  • Wind tunnel measurements
  • Optofluidics for flow measurement
  • Nanophotonic biosensors
  • Nano-engineered sensors
  • Biological flows
  • Optical oxygen detection
  • Upconversion temperature nanosensors
  • Nanoplasmonic photoluminescence enhancement

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessCommunication
Temperature Effects on Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint as a Luminescent Pressure Sensor
Aerospace 2020, 7(6), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7060080 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
Polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) has been used for capturing unsteady pressure over aerodynamic surfaces. Spatial and temporal pressure information is calculated from the luminescent intensity produced by a PC-PSP, which provides a nonintrusive pressure measurement. Despite its benefits, the temperature dependency of PC-PSP [...] Read more.
Polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) has been used for capturing unsteady pressure over aerodynamic surfaces. Spatial and temporal pressure information is calculated from the luminescent intensity produced by a PC-PSP, which provides a nonintrusive pressure measurement. Despite its benefits, the temperature dependency of PC-PSP makes extraction of quantitative pressure data challenging. The temperature dependency in terms of the static and dynamic characteristics of a ruthenium-based PC-PSP is studied herein. The impact of temperature dependency on PC-PSP characteristics is also discussed in the context of an unsteady pressure measurement. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Non-Intrusive Visualization of Optically Inaccessible Flow Fields Utilizing Positron Emission Tomography
Aerospace 2020, 7(5), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7050052 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
A technology gap persists in the visualization of optically inaccessible flow fields such as those in integrated systems. Advances in positron emission tomography (PET) technology are enabling its use in the engineering field to address this technology gap. This paper discusses a numerical [...] Read more.
A technology gap persists in the visualization of optically inaccessible flow fields such as those in integrated systems. Advances in positron emission tomography (PET) technology are enabling its use in the engineering field to address this technology gap. This paper discusses a numerical study performed to characterize a modern PET system’s ability to reconstruct a three-dimensional mapping of the optically inaccessible flow field downstream of an orifice. A method was devised to simulate a ring detector response to a flourine-18 radioisotope/water solution injected into the flow through a standard thickness pipe with orifice. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code and the GEANT4 Applications for the Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo simulation physics package were used to carry out the simulations. Results indicate that geometrical features, such as the pipe internal diameter, can be resolved to within a few millimeters with specific activity levels of 155 Bq/Voxel (91.2 Bq/mm3), and acquisition times as low as 15 s. Results also suggest that flow features, such as the radial extent of the shear layer between the primary and secondary recirculating flow can be resolved to within 5 mm with the same activity level, but with acquisition times of 45 s. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note
Remote and Feedback Control of the Flap Angle in a Wind Tunnel Test Model by Optical Measurement
Aerospace 2020, 7(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace7020011 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
We have developed a remote and precise feedback control system using optical measurement technology to alter the angle of a flap, which is part of a wind tunnel test model, automatically and to earn the aerodynamic data efficiently. To rectify the wasteful circumstance [...] Read more.
We have developed a remote and precise feedback control system using optical measurement technology to alter the angle of a flap, which is part of a wind tunnel test model, automatically and to earn the aerodynamic data efficiently. To rectify the wasteful circumstance that Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)’s low-turbulence wind tunnel stops ventilation every time to switch model configurations, we repaired hardware for remote operation and generated software for feedback control. As a result, we have accomplished a system that dramatically advances the efficiency of wind tunnel tests. Moreover, the system was able to consider the deformation of the model through optical measurement; the system controlled flap angles with errors less than the minimum resolution of optical measurement equipment. Consequently, we successfully grasped the nonlinearity of three aerodynamic coefficients C L , C D , and C M p that was impossible so far. Full article
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