Special Issue "Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Changhyun Roh
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Decommissioning Technology Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 989-111 Daedukdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 34057, Korea
2. Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Jeonbuk 56212, Korea
3. Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113, Korea
Interests: radiochemistry; radiation chemistry; nanomaterials; nanotechnology; nuclear energy; decommissioning and decontamination science and technology; environmental science and technology; radioactive isotopes; radiation; chemical engineering; separation technology; catalysis; biotechnology; education; sustainability; chemosensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal ChemEngineering is a publication that reports industrial and academic research in the broad fields of applied multidisciplinary and chemical engineering, with a special focus on fundamentals, processes, and products. The aim of this Special Issue is the better understanding of the potential industrial significance of chemical engineering. The Special Issue will cover all of the basic areas of chemical engineering, including catalysis, environmental engineering, energy, biotechnology, polymers, materials, process systems, transport, industrial chemistry, separations, and multidisciplinarity. In addition to traditional subjects, papers dealing with new areas of science and technology that fit the broad scope and objectives of the journal are encouraged. My aim is to encourage scientists and engineers to publish their experimental and theoretical results in as much detail as possible. Therefore, there is no restriction on the length of the papers. The types of articles to be published include original articles, editorials, case reports, reviews, short communications, and letters to the editor.

Prof. Dr. Changhyun Roh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Chemical engineering
  • Energy and environmental engineering
  • Separation and purification engineering
  • Catalysis
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanotechnology
  • Biotechnology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Cooperativity between Dimerization and Binding Equilibria in the Ternary System Laponite-Indocyanine Green-Water
ChemEngineering 2021, 5(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering5010006 - 01 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 723
Abstract
Laponite is an artificial nanoclay available in large quantities and at low cost. This marterial represents an efficient and suitable way of delivering hydrophobic vital dyes without the need for chemical functionalization. Laponite is available in large quantities and at low cost, then [...] Read more.
Laponite is an artificial nanoclay available in large quantities and at low cost. This marterial represents an efficient and suitable way of delivering hydrophobic vital dyes without the need for chemical functionalization. Laponite is available in large quantities and at low cost, then it would be an efficient way of delivering hydrophobic vital dyes without the need for chemical functionalization. The hydrodynamic diameter of laponite extrapolated to infinite dilution indicates that this clay is completely exfoliated. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic diameter in the laponite-Indocyanine green-water ternary system, at a fixed laponite concentration (2% (m/m)) exhibits a saturation curve. It was found that the extrapolated diameter at dye zero concentration is smaller than in pure water. Absorption spectra with fixed concentration of dye exhibit a red shift of 10–13 nm. On the contrary, the spectra acquired at a constant concentration of laponite do not undergo any displacement. The deconvolution of the spectra with two Gaussian peaks allows to calculate the concentration of the monomeric and dimeric species. The results were interpreted as a synergy between the dye dimerization balance and the dye-laponite binding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary)
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Article
Synthesis of Single-Phase Zeolite A by Coal Gasification Fine Slag from Ningdong and Its Application as a High-Efficiency Adsorbent for Cu2+ and Pb2+ in Simulated Waste Water
ChemEngineering 2020, 4(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4040065 - 11 Dec 2020
Viewed by 775
Abstract
Coal gasification is a new direction for the clean utilization of coal, but it also brings huge environmental pressure on solid waste. In this paper, the high-crystallinity single-phase zeolite A was prepared by solid-phase alkali fusion synthesis from coal gasification fine slag (CGFS), [...] Read more.
Coal gasification is a new direction for the clean utilization of coal, but it also brings huge environmental pressure on solid waste. In this paper, the high-crystallinity single-phase zeolite A was prepared by solid-phase alkali fusion synthesis from coal gasification fine slag (CGFS), without template agent, with low water consumption, and with low cost, and it was used to remove heavy metals such as Pb2+ and Cu2+ in simulated waste water. The main factors affecting the solid-phase and green synthesis methods were analyzed, and the optimum conditions for solid-phase synthesis of high-crystallinity single-phase zeolite A were determined as follows: NaOH/CGFS = 1.2; solid-phase alkali fusion temperature 823 K, solid-phase alkali fusion 90 min, liquid–solid ratio 4.5, and 353 K hydrothermal reaction for 12 h. The relative crystallinity, specific surface area, and ion-exchange capacity of single-phase zeolites A are 93.1%, 61.09 m2/g, and 268.4 mmol/100 g. The removal rates of Pb2+ and Cu2+ can reach more than 99%, especially for the removal efficiency of Pb2+, which is common in simulated waste water. This is an effective method with important application prospects, and it formed an effective way to recycle solid waste of coal chemical industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary)
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Article
MnO2-Coated Dual Core–Shell Spindle-Like Nanorods for Improved Capacity Retention of Lithium–Sulfur Batteries
ChemEngineering 2020, 4(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020042 - 19 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1426
Abstract
The emerging need for high-performance lithium–sulfur batteries has motivated many researchers to investigate different designs. However, the polysulfide shuttle effect, which is the result of dissolution of many intermediate polysulfides in electrolyte, has still remained unsolved. In this study, we have designed a [...] Read more.
The emerging need for high-performance lithium–sulfur batteries has motivated many researchers to investigate different designs. However, the polysulfide shuttle effect, which is the result of dissolution of many intermediate polysulfides in electrolyte, has still remained unsolved. In this study, we have designed a sulfur-filled dual core–shell spindle-like nanorod structure coated with manganese oxide ([email protected]@MnO2) to achieve a high-performance cathode for lithium–sulfur batteries. The cathode showed an initial discharge capacity of 1661 mA h g−1 with 80% retention of capacity over 70 cycles at a 0.2C rate. Furthermore, compared with the nanorods without any coating ([email protected]), the MnO2-coated material displayed superior rate capability, cycling stability, and Coulombic efficiency. The synergistic effects of the nitrogen-doped hollow carbon host and the MnO2 second shell are responsible for the improved electrochemical performance of this nanostructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary)
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Article
Parametric Sensitivity of CSTBRs for Lactobacillus casei: Normalized Sensitivity Analysis
ChemEngineering 2020, 4(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020041 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 919
Abstract
In this paper, a sensitivity analysis of a continuous stirred tank bioreactor (CSTBR) was conducted to determine a parametrically sensitive regime. The growth of a lactic acid bacterium, namely, Lactobacillus casei, in a pH-controlled CSTBR was considered as a process model. Normalized [...] Read more.
In this paper, a sensitivity analysis of a continuous stirred tank bioreactor (CSTBR) was conducted to determine a parametrically sensitive regime. The growth of a lactic acid bacterium, namely, Lactobacillus casei, in a pH-controlled CSTBR was considered as a process model. Normalized objective sensitivities of the minimum pH were determined with respect to input parameters. A generalized criterion for sensitivity was defined for determining the parametric range of three input variables, i.e., dilution rate base stream (θ), base concentration (R), and initial pH (pH0) for maintaining optimal pH range in the reactor. The system exhibits sensitive behavior for θ, R, and pH0, from 0.095 to 0.295, 0 to 0.865, and 4.42 to 4.77, respectively. The critical values of θ, R, and pH0 are 0.0195, 0.48, and 4.6, respectively. The mathematical model can also be used to determine a parametrically sensitive regime for other important parameters, namely, temperature, the concentration of metabolites, and other byproducts. The mathematical tool can also be used in bioreactor design and the improvement of control strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary)
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Review

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Review
Review of NMR Studies for Oilwell Cements and Their Importance
ChemEngineering 2021, 5(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering5020018 - 19 Apr 2021
Viewed by 474
Abstract
This paper summarizes experimental studies using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to evaluate cement porosity, pore size distribution, and other characteristics such as Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) gel structure and morphology. The first known paper on NMR experiments to investigate cement pastes was published [...] Read more.
This paper summarizes experimental studies using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to evaluate cement porosity, pore size distribution, and other characteristics such as Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) gel structure and morphology. The first known paper on NMR experiments to investigate cement pastes was published in 1978. Two main NMR parameters, the so-called longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation times, are commonly measured and analyzed, representing the water response which is trapped in the cement. The hydration process reported in this paper was found to be monitored from as low as 10 min to longer than 365 days. Other studies conducted experiments by using NMR, especially during the 1980s. These studies employed variations in methodologies and frequencies, making data comparison difficult. Additionally, different spectrometers and NMR concepts, as well as operating characteristics, were used. Therefore, it is challenging to reconcile results from previous NMR studies on cement. Other significant hurdles are different cement types, water/cement ratio, and curing conditions. One notable observation is that there has not been any comprehensive laboratory work related to NMR on oilfield cement types, including porosity and hydration. Two recent studies have presented NMR measurements on class G and class H cements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Engineering and Multidisciplinary)
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