Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

J. Imaging, Volume 5, Issue 6 (June 2019)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Image-Based RCS Estimation from Near-Field Data
J. Imaging 2019, 5(6), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5060061
Received: 7 May 2019 / Revised: 12 June 2019 / Accepted: 14 June 2019 / Published: 17 June 2019
Viewed by 358 | PDF Full-text (943 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper deals with the problem of estimating the RCS from near-field data by image-based approaches. In particular, a rigorous focusing procedure based on a weighted adjoint scheme, which is also applicable to an arbitrary measurement curve, is developed. The developed formalism allows [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the problem of estimating the RCS from near-field data by image-based approaches. In particular, a rigorous focusing procedure based on a weighted adjoint scheme, which is also applicable to an arbitrary measurement curve, is developed. The developed formalism allows us to address the important question concerning the need to employ a multi-frequency configuration to estimate the RCS. Accordingly, it is shown that if RCS is required at a given frequency, then the target image obtained solely at such a frequency can be exploited provided that the spatial truncation arising from the size of the investigated area is properly taken into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microwave Imaging and Electromagnetic Inverse Scattering Problems)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Potential of Optical Profilometry in the Study of Cultural Stone Weathering
J. Imaging 2019, 5(6), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5060060
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 13 June 2019 / Accepted: 14 June 2019 / Published: 16 June 2019
Viewed by 463 | PDF Full-text (2386 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The problem of deterioration of marble or stone monuments on display in the open air was raised in scientific terms around the mid-nineteenth century, correctly sensing the close dependence between the increased speed of surfaces alteration and air pollution. However, only more recently, [...] Read more.
The problem of deterioration of marble or stone monuments on display in the open air was raised in scientific terms around the mid-nineteenth century, correctly sensing the close dependence between the increased speed of surfaces alteration and air pollution. However, only more recently, around the years 1980–1990, emerged a need for quantitative data to assess the degree of degradation and the relative danger in the future projections. Non-destructive techniques can be an important aid in assessing the state of degradation and, above all, its speed, directly on the most important monuments exposed to the urban environment. In this work we discuss some non-destructive techniques able to evaluate the alteration of the surface shape of artefacts exposed to the environment through a non-contact survey of their surface shape. Advantages and disadvantages will be highlighted, as well as the problems still open. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Color Holography for the Documentation and Dissemination of Cultural Heritage: OptoClonesTM from Four Museums in Two Countries
J. Imaging 2019, 5(6), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5060059
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 7 June 2019 / Accepted: 11 June 2019 / Published: 15 June 2019
Viewed by 494 | PDF Full-text (5166 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
True-color holograms, as they are the most advanced and realistic three-dimensional images obtainable with current technologies, can become valuable tools for the preservation, documentation and diffusion of cultural heritage. In this respect, the transportable Z3RGB color holography system and the HoLoFoSTM [...] Read more.
True-color holograms, as they are the most advanced and realistic three-dimensional images obtainable with current technologies, can become valuable tools for the preservation, documentation and diffusion of cultural heritage. In this respect, the transportable Z3RGB color holography system and the HoLoFoSTM illuminant developed by the Hellenic Institute of Holography have been successfully utilized for the in-situ recording and displaying of OptoClonesTM (Denisyuk-type color holograms) in four museums and two countries. The holographic image of an OptoCloneTM is characterized by a wide angle of view, full parallax and perspective, good color rendition and ultra-realistic reproduction of the optical properties of the materials of an artefact. In this paper, we report on our accumulated expertise in on-site holographic documentation of museum artworks of various types, already from four museums of world caliber and reputation (Athens and Thessaloniki Byzantine, Fabergé Museum of St. Petersburg and Diamond Fund of Russia). In one case, a world’s first, the in-situ recorded OptoClonesTM have been subsequently displayed as part of the permanent exhibition of the Byzantine & Christian Museum of Athens in replacement of the original artifacts while on loan. On another occasion involving State Treasures from the Diamond Fund of Russia, the recorded OptoClonesTM exhibited inside the Moscow Kremlin were highly appraised by officials and international experts as well as the general public allowing reasonable optimism for the prospects of Display Holography for museums. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Combined Non-Invasive Approach to the Study of A Mosaic Model: First Laboratory Experimental Results
J. Imaging 2019, 5(6), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5060058
Received: 28 April 2019 / Revised: 5 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
Viewed by 442 | PDF Full-text (6811 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents first laboratory results of a combined approach carried out by the use of three different portable non-invasive electromagnetic methods: Digital holographic speckle pattern interferometry (DHSPI), stimulated infrared thermography (SIRT) and holographic subsurface radar (HSR), proposed for the analysis of a [...] Read more.
This paper presents first laboratory results of a combined approach carried out by the use of three different portable non-invasive electromagnetic methods: Digital holographic speckle pattern interferometry (DHSPI), stimulated infrared thermography (SIRT) and holographic subsurface radar (HSR), proposed for the analysis of a custom-built wall mosaic model. The model reproduces a series of defects (e.g., cracks, voids, detachments), simulating common deteriorated, restored or reshuffled areas in wall mosaics. DHSPI and SIRT, already well known in the field of non-destructive (NDT) methods, are full-field contactless techniques, providing complementary information on the subsurface hidden discontinuities. The use of DHSPI, based on optical imaging and interferometry, provides remote control and visualization of surface micro-deformation after induced thermal stress, while the use of SIRT allows visualization of thermal energy diffusion in the surface upon the induced thermal stress. DHSPI and SIRT data are complemented by the use of HSR, a contact method that provides localized information about the distribution of contrasts in dielectric permittivity and related possible anomalies. The experimental results, made by the combined use of these methods to the identification of the known anomalies in the mosaic model, are presented and discussed here as a contribution in the development of an efficient non-invasive approach to the in-situ subsurface analysis of ancient wall mosaics. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Superpixel Segmentation Based on Anisotropic Edge Strength
J. Imaging 2019, 5(6), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5060057
Received: 12 April 2019 / Revised: 23 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 498 | PDF Full-text (7916 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Superpixel segmentation can benefit from the use of an appropriate method to measure edge strength. In this paper, we present such a method based on the first derivative of anisotropic Gaussian kernels. The kernels can capture the position, direction, prominence, and scale of [...] Read more.
Superpixel segmentation can benefit from the use of an appropriate method to measure edge strength. In this paper, we present such a method based on the first derivative of anisotropic Gaussian kernels. The kernels can capture the position, direction, prominence, and scale of the edge to be detected. We incorporate the anisotropic edge strength into the distance measure between neighboring superpixels, thereby improving the performance of an existing graph-based superpixel segmentation method. Experimental results validate the superiority of our method in generating superpixels over the competing methods. It is also illustrated that the proposed superpixel segmentation method can facilitate subsequent saliency detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soft Computing for Edge Detection)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Imaging EISSN 2313-433X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top