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Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ., Volume 12, Issue 10 (October 2022) – 10 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): Universities have increasingly become more multicultural environments around the world. Concurrently, a high prevalence of anxiety and depression has been detected in university students. With the aim of promoting integrative acculturation and supporting psychological well-being, the Interculturality and Mindfulness Program (PIM) was developed. In order to assess its effects quasi-experimental research was conducted, with pre- and post-test comparative measurements in three groups: in-person (IG), synchronous online (OG), and passive control (CG). A diverse group of students (n = 150) from two universities in Portugal participated. The PIM indicated beneficial results in both the IG and OG groups, and is a promising intervention for the prevention of mental health issues as well as for the promotion of well-being. View this paper
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13 pages, 669 KiB  
Article
Emotion Dysregulation and Conspiracy Beliefs about COVID-19: The Moderating Role of Critical Social Media Use
by Cristiano Scandurra, Rosa Pizzo, Luca Emanuel Pinto, Claudia Cafasso, Renata Pellegrini, Federica Cafaggi, Oriana D’Anna, Benedetta Muzii, Vincenzo Bochicchio and Nelson Mauro Maldonato
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1559-1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100109 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3249
Abstract
As COVID-19 has spread worldwide, conspiracy theories have proliferated rapidly on social media platforms, adversely affecting public health. For this reason, media literacy interventions have been highly recommended, although the impact of critical social media use on the development of COVID-19 conspiracy theories [...] Read more.
As COVID-19 has spread worldwide, conspiracy theories have proliferated rapidly on social media platforms, adversely affecting public health. For this reason, media literacy interventions have been highly recommended, although the impact of critical social media use on the development of COVID-19 conspiracy theories has not yet been empirically studied. Moreover, emotional dysregulation may play another crucial role in the development of such theories, as they are often associated with stress, anxiety, lack of control, and other negative emotions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation would be positively associated with conspiracy beliefs about COVID-19 and that critical use of social media would attenuate this association. Data from 930 Italian participants (339 men and 591 women) were collected online during the third wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. A moderated model was tested using the PROCESS Macro for SPSS. Results showed that: (1) emotion dysregulation and critical social media use accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in conspiracy beliefs about COVID-19; and (2) critical social media use moderated the effect of emotion dysregulation on conspiracy beliefs about COVID-19. Implications for preventing the spread of conspiracy theories are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health during COVID-19 Pandemic: What Do We Know So Far?)
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24 pages, 5089 KiB  
Article
Effect of Indian Music as an Auditory Stimulus on Physiological Measures of Stress, Anxiety, Cardiovascular and Autonomic Responses in Humans—A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Kirthana Kunikullaya Ubrangala, Radhika Kunnavil, Mamta Sanjeeva Vernekar, Jaisri Goturu, Vijayadas, V. S. Prakash and Nandagudi Srinivasa Murthy
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1535-1558; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100108 - 19 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3572
Abstract
Among the different anthropogenic stimuli humans are exposed to, the psychological and cardiovascular effects of auditory stimuli are less understood. This study aims to explore the possible range of change after a single session of auditory stimulation with three different ‘Modes’ of musical [...] Read more.
Among the different anthropogenic stimuli humans are exposed to, the psychological and cardiovascular effects of auditory stimuli are less understood. This study aims to explore the possible range of change after a single session of auditory stimulation with three different ‘Modes’ of musical stimuli (MS) on anxiety, biomarkers of stress, and cardiovascular parameters among healthy young individuals. In this randomized control trial, 140 healthy young adults, aged 18–30 years, were randomly assigned to three MS groups (Mode/Raga Miyan ki Todi, Malkauns, and Puriya) and one control group (natural sounds). The outcome measurements of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), salivary cortisol (sCort), blood pressure, and heart rate variability (HRV) were collected at three time points: before (M1), during (M2), and after the intervention (M3). State anxiety was reduced significantly with raga Puriya (p = 0.018), followed by raga Malkauns and raga Miyan Ki Todi. All the groups showed a significant reduction in sAA. Raga Miyan ki Todi and Puriya caused an arousal effect (as evidenced by HRV) during the intervention and significant relaxation after the intervention (both p < 0.005). Raga Malkauns and the control group had a sustained rise in parasympathetic activity over 30 min. Future studies should try to use other modes and features to develop a better scientific foundation for the use of Indian music in medicine. Full article
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14 pages, 752 KiB  
Article
An International Study of Correlates of Women’s Positive Body Image
by Sandra Torres, Carolina A. Araújo, Amanda Fitzgerald, Barbara Dooley, Angeliki Leondari, Cátia Miriam Costa, Dorit Olenik-Shemesh, Efthymia Sygkollitou, Josip Burusic, Liesbet Boone, Marijana Šuvak-Martinović, Maritta Välimäki, Minna Anttila, Tali Heiman and Toni Babarović
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1521-1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100107 - 19 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3027
Abstract
Positive body image (PBI) has received attention in the recent research literature. Despite this, its role in daily functioning in different cultural contexts, particularly its potential relationship with academic outcomes, is still lacking. This study aimed to offer an international perspective on the [...] Read more.
Positive body image (PBI) has received attention in the recent research literature. Despite this, its role in daily functioning in different cultural contexts, particularly its potential relationship with academic outcomes, is still lacking. This study aimed to offer an international perspective on the association between PBI and body mass index (BMI), perceived academic achievement, and educational aspirations, as well as the mediating role of self-esteem. A cross-national study was conducted in eight European countries with a total of 2653 female university students. Participants completed an online survey measuring PBI (conceptualized as body appreciation), self-esteem, perceived academic achievement and aspirations, and body mass index (BMI). Results revealed differences in PBI between countries (low magnitude). PBI correlated negatively with BMI in all national groups (low-to-moderate magnitude). Mediation analysis showed that self-esteem mediated the association between PBI and academic variables. Findings from this study suggest that building students’ self-esteem and PBI can be a suitable way to boost academic success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health Psychology: Theories, Methods and Applications)
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3 pages, 399 KiB  
Editorial
Introduction to The Special Issue “Safety Training Effectiveness: A Research Agenda”
by Federico Ricci and Fabrizio Bracco
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1518-1520; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100106 - 19 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1322
Abstract
This Special Issue, “Safety Training Effectiveness: A Research Agenda,” aims to address training as one of the many elements that play a role in determining so-called safety outcomes [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety Training Effectiveness: A Research Agenda)
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2 pages, 855 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Krause et al. Higher Order Thinking by Setting and Debriefing Tasks in Dutch Geography Lessons. Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12, 11–27
by Uwe Krause, Tine Béneker and Jan van Tartwijk
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1516-1517; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100105 - 9 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1137
Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
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16 pages, 1253 KiB  
Article
Effects of the Interculturality and Mindfulness Program (PIM) on University Students: A Quasi-Experimental Study
by Roberto Chiodelli, Saúl Neves de Jesus, Luana Thereza Nesi de Mello, Ilana Andretta, Diana Fernandes Oliveira, Maria Emília Santos Costa and Tamara Russell
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1500-1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100104 - 5 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2600
Abstract
Rates of mental health issues have been increasing among university students. This study investigates the effects of the Interculturality and Mindfulness Program (PIM) on academic students on mindfulness, emotional regulation, depression, anxiety, stress, life satisfaction, optimism, positive solitude, and loneliness. A quasi-experimental research [...] Read more.
Rates of mental health issues have been increasing among university students. This study investigates the effects of the Interculturality and Mindfulness Program (PIM) on academic students on mindfulness, emotional regulation, depression, anxiety, stress, life satisfaction, optimism, positive solitude, and loneliness. A quasi-experimental research was conducted, with pre- and post-test comparative measurements in three groups: in-person (IG), synchronous online (OG), and passive control (CG). A diverse group of students (n = 150; mean age = 25.4 ± 8.31) participated from two universities in Portugal. When compared to the CG, both active groups (IG and OG) demonstrated a beneficial interaction effect in acceptance, positive solitude, optimism, and mindfulness. The IG demonstrated a positive interaction effect in awareness and satisfaction with life, whereas the OG indicated a favorable interaction effect in impulse. When analyzing the intra-group effects, both active groups presented a significant improvement in stress, emotion regulation, mindfulness, positive solitude, and optimism. The OG demonstrated an improvement in awareness and loneliness. The main limitations of this research are that students were not randomly assigned, and groups were heterogeneous in nationality, education level, and sex. Nonetheless, PIM has indicated beneficial results in both IG and OG, and is a promising intervention for the prevention of mental health issues (e.g., stress, difficulties in emotional regulation, and loneliness), as well as for the promotion of well-being (e.g., positive solitude, mindfulness, life satisfaction, and optimism). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Problems and Mindful/Acceptance Frameworks)
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2 pages, 196 KiB  
Editorial
Introduction to the Special Issue on Recent Advances in Mathematics Education
by Michael Gr. Voskoglou and Joanna Mamona-Downs
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1498-1499; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100103 - 4 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1257
Abstract
The Special Issue with the title “Recent Advances in Mathematics Education” presents contemporary research outcomes regarding the teaching and learning of Mathematics at all levels of Education [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Mathematics Education)
27 pages, 1021 KiB  
Systematic Review
Effectiveness of Digital Interventions for Deficit-Oriented and Asset-Oriented Psychological Outcomes in the Workplace: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis
by Maria Armaou, Evangelia Araviaki, Snigdha Dutta, Stathis Konstantinidis and Holly Blake
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1471-1497; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100102 - 3 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2978
Abstract
Background: Digital psychological interventions can target deficit-oriented and asset-oriented psychological outcomes in the workplace. This review examined: (a) the effectiveness of digital interventions for psychological well-being at work, (b) associations with workplace outcomes, and (c) associations between interventions’ effectiveness and their theory-base. Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: Digital psychological interventions can target deficit-oriented and asset-oriented psychological outcomes in the workplace. This review examined: (a) the effectiveness of digital interventions for psychological well-being at work, (b) associations with workplace outcomes, and (c) associations between interventions’ effectiveness and their theory-base. Methods: six electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) and quasi-experimental studies. The methodological quality of studies that used randomisation was conducted with the “Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias” tool, while the “JBI Critical Appraisal Checklist” was used for non-randomised studies. Studies’ theory-base was evaluated using an adaptation of the “theory coding scheme” (TSC). Due to heterogeneity, narrative synthesis was performed. Results: 51 studies were included in a synthesis describing four clusters of digital interventions: (a) cognitive behavioural therapy, (b) stress-management interventions and workplace well-being promotion, (c) meditation training and mindfulness-based interventions, and (d) self-help interventions. Studies demonstrated a high risk of contamination effects and high attrition bias. Theory-informed interventions demonstrated greater effectiveness. Cognitive behavioural therapy demonstrated the most robust evidence for reducing depression symptoms among healthy employees. With the exception of the Headspace application, there was weak evidence for meditation training apps, while relaxation training was a key component of effective stress-management interventions. Full article
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8 pages, 311 KiB  
Brief Report
Perception of Vulnerability and Ruminant Thoughts about COVID-19 in Spanish Students
by José-María Figueredo, Cristina García-Ael and Gabriela Topa
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1463-1470; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100101 - 1 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1431
Abstract
The current situation in schools in relation to COVID-19 can generate a decrease in academic performance due to factors intrinsic to students. Therefore, rumination about COVID-19 could interfere with students’ attention, resulting in a decrease in their academic performance. Therefore, the objective of [...] Read more.
The current situation in schools in relation to COVID-19 can generate a decrease in academic performance due to factors intrinsic to students. Therefore, rumination about COVID-19 could interfere with students’ attention, resulting in a decrease in their academic performance. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the perception of vulnerability to the disease and rumination about COVID-19 from a cross-sectional sample of post-compulsory education students. The differences in the perception of vulnerability to disease and rumination in different groups were analyzed, separated by gender. Our data suggest a positive relationship between the perception of vulnerability to the disease and ruminants’ thoughts about COVID-19 (r = 0.29). Gender differences are significant, with women having higher scores than men in both variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Collection Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
22 pages, 720 KiB  
Article
A Pre-Adolescent and Adolescent Clinical Sample Study about Suicidal Ideation, Suicide Attempt, and Self-Harming
by Alessia Raffagnato, Sara Iannattone, Rachele Fasolato, Elisa Parolin, Benedetta Ravaglia, Gaia Biscalchin, Annalisa Traverso, Silvia Zanato, Marina Miscioscia and Michela Gatta
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(10), 1441-1462; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12100100 - 1 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3576
Abstract
Suicide is the second cause of death among adolescents, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is one of the main risk factors for suicidal behavior. However, the possible variables specifically associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt, as well as the psychopathological characteristics linked to [...] Read more.
Suicide is the second cause of death among adolescents, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is one of the main risk factors for suicidal behavior. However, the possible variables specifically associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt, as well as the psychopathological characteristics linked to the concomitant presence of suicidal ideation/attempt and NSSI are still under-investigated in youth. The current study aimed to address these issues in a sample of 174 young Italian inpatients (Mage = 14.3 years ± 1.93, 78.2% girls). Sociodemographic and clinical variables were assessed through psycho-diagnostic interviews and ad hoc questionnaires. A binomial logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Then, Kruskal–Wallis tests were run to analyze the psychopathological differences between patients with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt considering the coexistence of NSSI. The results highlighted that previous access to child mental health services and general psychopathological problems significantly predicted suicidal ideation, while previous hospitalizations, borderline personality functioning, and affective disorders significantly predicted suicide attempt. In general, inpatients with also NSSI reported higher levels of internalizing, somatic and total problems, impulsiveness, alexithymia, and emotional dysregulation. The clinical implications of our findings in terms of primary and secondary preventive programs are discussed. Full article
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