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Article

Plant Response to Mechanically-Induced Stress: A Case Study on Specialized Metabolites of Leafy Vegetables

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Department of Agricultural Technology, Storage and Transport, University of Zagreb Faculty of Agriculture, Svetošimunska Cesta 25, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Vegetable Crops, University of Zagreb Faculty of Agriculture, Svetošimunska Cesta 25, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Milan S. Stankovic, Paula Baptista and Petronia Carillo
Plants 2021, 10(12), 2650; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122650
Received: 8 November 2021 / Revised: 26 November 2021 / Accepted: 30 November 2021 / Published: 2 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Plants—Recent Advances and Perspectives)
Plants have evolved various adaptive mechanisms to environmental stresses, such as sensory mechanisms to detect mechanical stimuli. This plant adaptation has been successfully used in the production practice of leafy vegetables, called mechanical conditioning, for many years, but there is still a lack of research on the effects of mechanically-induced stress on the content of specialized metabolites, or phytochemicals with significant antioxidant activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the content of specialized metabolites and antioxidant capacity of lettuce and green chicory under the influence of mechanical stimulation by brushing. Mechanically-induced stress had a positive effect on the content of major antioxidants in plant cells, specifically vitamin C, total phenols, and flavonoids. In contrast, no effect of mechanical stimulation was found on the content of pigments, total chlorophylls, and carotenoids. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that induced mechanical stress is a good practice in the cultivation of leafy vegetables, the application of which provides high quality plant material with high nutritional potential and significantly higher content of antioxidants and phytochemicals important for human health. View Full-Text
Keywords: brushing; lettuce; chicory; phytochemicals; antioxidant capacity brushing; lettuce; chicory; phytochemicals; antioxidant capacity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Šic Žlabur, J.; Radman, S.; Fabek Uher, S.; Opačić, N.; Benko, B.; Galić, A.; Samirić, P.; Voća, S. Plant Response to Mechanically-Induced Stress: A Case Study on Specialized Metabolites of Leafy Vegetables. Plants 2021, 10, 2650. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122650

AMA Style

Šic Žlabur J, Radman S, Fabek Uher S, Opačić N, Benko B, Galić A, Samirić P, Voća S. Plant Response to Mechanically-Induced Stress: A Case Study on Specialized Metabolites of Leafy Vegetables. Plants. 2021; 10(12):2650. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122650

Chicago/Turabian Style

Šic Žlabur, Jana, Sanja Radman, Sanja Fabek Uher, Nevena Opačić, Božidar Benko, Ante Galić, Paola Samirić, and Sandra Voća. 2021. "Plant Response to Mechanically-Induced Stress: A Case Study on Specialized Metabolites of Leafy Vegetables" Plants 10, no. 12: 2650. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10122650

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