Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Cosmetics, Volume 1, Issue 4 (December 2014) , Pages 222-231

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Influence of Temperature and Ultrasonic Treatment on Preparation of Titanium Phosphates and Their Powder Properties
Cosmetics 2014, 1(4), 222-231; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics1040222
Received: 3 May 2014 / Revised: 31 July 2014 / Accepted: 28 September 2014 / Published: 8 October 2014
Viewed by 2697 | PDF Full-text (1167 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Catalytically active titanium dioxide is conventionally used as a white pigment for cosmetics, but undesirably induces a certain degree of decomposition of sebum on the skin on exposure to ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium phosphates were prepared as a novel [...] Read more.
Catalytically active titanium dioxide is conventionally used as a white pigment for cosmetics, but undesirably induces a certain degree of decomposition of sebum on the skin on exposure to ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium phosphates were prepared as a novel white pigment for cosmetics using titanium sulfate and phosphoric acid at various temperatures, with/without ultrasonic treatment. The chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, moisture retention, and smoothness of the phosphates were evaluated. These titanium phosphates had less photocatalytic activity than titanium dioxide, which should be beneficial for protecting sebum on the skin. Samples prepared with ultrasonic treatment had lower visible light absorption than those not subjected to ultrasonication. The sample prepared at 40 °C with ultrasonic treatment had higher moisture retention capacity than those prepared under other conditions. Samples prepared at 40 °C had lower slipping resistance than samples prepared at 7 °C. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Cosmetics EISSN 2079-9284 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top