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Coatings, Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2012) , Pages 210-241

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Open AccessArticle
On the Porosity of Cu Coatings Formed in Earth-Based and Space Conditions
Coatings 2012, 2(4), 235-241; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings2040235 - 20 Nov 2012
Viewed by 2598
Abstract
This work surveys the structure, substructure and submicroporosity of Cu metal coatings following condensation both under the conditions of space flight of orbital stations (OS) and under Earth-based conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and the method of Ar low-temperature desorption were used for [...] Read more.
This work surveys the structure, substructure and submicroporosity of Cu metal coatings following condensation both under the conditions of space flight of orbital stations (OS) and under Earth-based conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and the method of Ar low-temperature desorption were used for investigation. It has been shown that the condensates deposited in space contain less and relatively equiaxial submicropores (SMPs) distributed more homogeneously than Earth-based disperse films. Full article
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Open AccessReview
An Overview of the Scratch Resistance of Automotive Coatings: Exterior Clearcoats and Polycarbonate Hardcoats
Coatings 2012, 2(4), 221-234; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings2040221 - 12 Nov 2012
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3896
Abstract
The scratch resistance of coatings used on two highly visible automotive applications (automotive bodies and window glazings) were examined and reviewed. Types of damage (scratch vs. mar), the impact on customers, and the causes of scratch events were investigated. Different exterior clearcoat technologies, [...] Read more.
The scratch resistance of coatings used on two highly visible automotive applications (automotive bodies and window glazings) were examined and reviewed. Types of damage (scratch vs. mar), the impact on customers, and the causes of scratch events were investigated. Different exterior clearcoat technologies, including UV curable and self-healing formulations were reviewed, including results from nano- and macro-scratch tests. Polycarbonate hardcoat glazings were tested vs. annealed glass samples using a Taber abraser, with the resulting damage analyzed using transmitted haze measurements and optical profilometry. A correlation between the damage seen in glass samples (many smooth, shallow mars) and the best hardcoat samples (fewer, deeper scratches) and the haze measurements was discussed. Nano-scratch results showed similar fracture forces, but measurably improved mar resistance for the hardcoats/glass system compared to exterior clearcoats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)
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Open AccessReview
Protection and Reinforcement of Tooth Structures by Dental Coating Materials
Coatings 2012, 2(4), 210-220; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings2040210 - 01 Oct 2012
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5012
Abstract
It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation and [...] Read more.
It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation and before making an impression by assembling a dentin bonding system and a flowable composite. Resin coatings minimize pulp irritation and improve the bond strength between a resin cement and tooth when bonding the restoration to tooth. Recently, thin-film coating dental materials based on all-in-one adhesive technology were introduced for resin coating of indirect restorations. The thin coating materials are applied in a single clinical step and create a barrier-like film layer on the prepared dentin. The thin coatings play an important role in protecting the dentin from physical, chemical, and biological irritation. In addition, these thin-film coating materials reportedly prevent marginal leakage beneath inlays or crown restorations. In light of the many benefits provided by such a protective layer, these all-in-one adhesive materials may therefore also have the potential to cover exposed root dentin surfaces and prevent caries formation. In this paper, recent progress of the dental coating materials and their clinical applications are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dental Biomaterials and Coatings)
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