Next Article in Journal
Turnover of Minerals and Organics in the Postharvest Herbage of Annuals and Perennials: Winter Wheat and Goldenrod
Previous Article in Journal
Sustainability of Urban Agriculture: Vegetable Production on Green Roofs
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agriculture 2018, 8(11), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8110169

Micronutrient Availability in Alternative Foods During Agricultural Catastrophes

1,2,3,4
and
5,6,7,*
1
Alliance to Feed the Earth in Disasters (ALLFED), Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
2
Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209, USA
3
Global Catastrophic Risk Institute (GCRI), Calabasas, CA 91302, USA
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
5
Department of Materials Science & Engineering Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
6
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
7
Department of Electronics and Nanoengineering, School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, 00076 Espoo, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 August 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 25 October 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [3635 KB, uploaded 25 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

Several catastrophes could block the sun, including asteroid/comet impact, super volcanic eruption, and nuclear war with the burning of cities (nuclear winter). Previous work has analyzed alternate food supplies (e.g., mushrooms growing on dead trees, bacteria growing on natural gas). This was shown to be technically capable of feeding everyone with macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, and lipids) and minerals, although economics and politics remain uncertain. The present work analyzes vitamin availability in such alternative food scenarios. The vitamin content of various alternate foods is compared to the US recommended daily allowance (RDA) as well as the average requirement defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and insufficiencies of single food sources are discussed. Single alternate food sources are always deficient in some vitamins, and the problems associated with this are discussed. To prevent disease in an alternative food scenario a wide range of foods must be consumed, or the diet must be supplemented. Backup plans discussed include chemical synthesis of vitamins, plants grown with artificial light and growing bacteria rich in certain vitamins. Finally, insights from this analysis are provided for combating existing micronutritional deficiencies using alternative foods today. View Full-Text
Keywords: alternate food; alternative food; essential nutrients; existential risk; global catastrophic risk; nuclear war; micronutrients; nutrients; public health; vitamins alternate food; alternative food; essential nutrients; existential risk; global catastrophic risk; nuclear war; micronutrients; nutrients; public health; vitamins
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Denkenberger, D.; Pearce, J.M. Micronutrient Availability in Alternative Foods During Agricultural Catastrophes. Agriculture 2018, 8, 169.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agriculture EISSN 2077-0472 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top