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Assessment of In Vitro Bioactivities of Polysaccharides Isolated from Hericium Novae-Zealandiae

1
Food Science, School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
3
Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
4
Manaaki Whenua-Landcare Research, Auckland 1072, New Zealand
5
Riddet Institute, New Zealand Centre of Research Excellence for Food Research, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(7), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8070211
Received: 21 June 2019 / Revised: 2 July 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 8 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Antioxidants in Cancer Chemoprevention)
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the potential effect of the polysaccharides isolated from Hericium novae-zealandiae, a native New Zealand fungus, on the in vitro proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines, gene expression, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and oxidation. One water-soluble and two alkali-soluble polysaccharide fractions were isolated from H. novae-zealandiae. The proliferation of the prostate cancer cell lines DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 was evaluated following treatment with these polysaccharide fractions. It was found that the polysaccharides possess anti-proliferative activity on LNCaP and PC3 cells, with a 50% growth inhibition (IC50) value as low as 0.61 mg/mL in LNCaP. Subsequently, it was determined through via RT-qPCR assay that apoptosis was one of the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-proliferative activity in LNCaP. This was supported by the up-regulation of CASP3, CASP8, and CASP9. An alternative, discovered in PC3, was revealed to be anti-inflammation, which was hinted at by the down-regulation of IL6 and up-regulation of IL24. The polysaccharides also exhibited antioxidant and weak AChE inhibitory activities. This is the first report on the potential health benefits of polysaccharides prepared from the New Zealand fungus, H. novae-zealandiae. View Full-Text
Keywords: polysaccharides; prostate cancer; anti-proliferation; AChE; antioxidant; Hericium novae-zealandiae polysaccharides; prostate cancer; anti-proliferation; AChE; antioxidant; Hericium novae-zealandiae
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Chen, Z.G.; Bishop, K.S.; Tanambell, H.; Buchanan, P.; Quek, S.Y. Assessment of In Vitro Bioactivities of Polysaccharides Isolated from Hericium Novae-Zealandiae. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 211.

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