Next Article in Journal
Oxidant-Mediated Protein Amino Acid Conversion
Next Article in Special Issue
Effect of Polyphenol-Rich Dark Chocolate on Salivary Cortisol and Mood in Adults
Previous Article in Journal
Hydrogen Sulfide and Persulfides Oxidation by Biologically Relevant Oxidizing Species
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evaluation of the In Vitro Wound-Healing Activity of Calabrian Honeys
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

A Single-Dose of a Polyphenol-Rich Fucus Vesiculosus Extract is Insufficient to Blunt the Elevated Postprandial Blood Glucose Responses Exhibited by Healthy Adults in the Evening: A Randomised Crossover Trial

1
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Monash University, Notting Hill VIC 3168, Australia
2
School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
3
School of Science and Computing, Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Galway H91 T8NW, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8020049
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 16 February 2019 / Published: 24 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease)
  |  
PDF [2231 KB, uploaded 24 February 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

When healthy adults consume carbohydrates at night, postprandial blood glucose responses are elevated and prolonged compared to daytime.Extended postprandial hyperglycaemia is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols are bioactive secondary metabolites of plants and algae with potential to moderate postprandial glycaemia. This study investigated whether a polyphenol-rich alga (Fucus vesiculosus) extract moderated postprandial glycaemia in the evening in healthy adults. In a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomised three-way crossover trial, 18 participants consumed a polyphenol-rich extract, a cellulose placebo and rice flour placebo (7:15 p.m.) prior to 50 g available carbohydrate from bread (7:45 p.m.), followed by three hours of blood sampling to assess glucose and insulin. A subset of participants (n = 8) completed the same protocol once in the morning with only the cellulose placebo (7:15 a.m.). No effect of the polyphenol-rich extract was observed on postprandial glycaemia in the evening, compared with placebos, in the group as a whole. However, in females only, peak blood glucose concentration was reduced following the polyphenol-rich extract. In the subset analysis, as expected, participants exhibited elevated postprandial blood glucose in the evening compared with the morning following the cellulose placebo. This was the first study to investigate whether a polyphenol intervention moderated evening postprandial hyperglycaemia. The lowering effect observed in females suggests that this warrants further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; insulin; polyphenol; circadian rhythm; night; algae; hyperglycaemia; hyperinsulinaemia glucose; insulin; polyphenol; circadian rhythm; night; algae; hyperglycaemia; hyperinsulinaemia
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Murray, M.; Dordevic, A.L.; Ryan, L.; Bonham, M.P. A Single-Dose of a Polyphenol-Rich Fucus Vesiculosus Extract is Insufficient to Blunt the Elevated Postprandial Blood Glucose Responses Exhibited by Healthy Adults in the Evening: A Randomised Crossover Trial. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 49.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Antioxidants EISSN 2076-3921 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top