Special Issue "Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Catherine Tsang

Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edge Hill University, Lancashire, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: polyphenols; contemporary disease; functional foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the Guest Editor of this Special Issue, I would like to invite you to contribute a paper focusing on the role of Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease. Diet-related chronic conditions of modern society, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, neurodegenerative disease, and cognitive decline, are one of the main causes of death. Diet is a well-recognised modifiable risk factor that can help reduce contemporary diseases, improving healthy aging and health span quality. Polyphenols are a diverse and heterogenous group of secondary plant metabolites, found in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, and many other plant foods. Continuing research highlights the dynamic capacity of polyphenols to exert potential health effects through several mechanisms. We would be happy to receive your manuscript related to this topic. Once the Special Issue is closed, we will share it with relevant scholars to promote all contributions. Antioxidants (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/antioxidants) is an Open Access journal with high visibility; we also provide free English editing after the acceptance of your paper. The Article Processing Charges (APC) are 550 CHF (Swiss Francs) per accepted paper; please see https://www.mdpi.com/about/apc for details. If you wish to check the suitability of your manuscript for this Special Issue prior to submission, you are welcome to send an abstract to the editorial office, [email protected] or [email protected] and you will receive a prompt feedback.

We look forward to collaborating with you in the near future.

Dr. Catherine Tsang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary Polyphenols
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Type-2 diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Mechanisms of action
  • Bioavailability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Polyphenol-Rich Dark Chocolate on Salivary Cortisol and Mood in Adults
Antioxidants 2019, 8(6), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8060149
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 29 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (622 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ingestion of polyphenol-rich dark chocolate improved salivary cortisol levels and subjective mood states in adults recruited from a health and social care setting. Twenty-six participants ingested 25 g/day of a high polyphenol dark [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ingestion of polyphenol-rich dark chocolate improved salivary cortisol levels and subjective mood states in adults recruited from a health and social care setting. Twenty-six participants ingested 25 g/day of a high polyphenol dark chocolate (containing 500 mg of total flavonoids) or a similar amount of a control dark chocolate containing negligible flavonoids for four weeks. Twenty-four-hour salivary glucocorticoid levels (cortisol and cortisone) were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and subjective mood was assessed using a validated Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. Total daily cortisol, morning cortisol, and the cortisol/cortisone ratio were significantly reduced (p < 0.001) after ingestion of only the high polyphenol dark chocolate. There were no significant differences between groups for overall scores for positive affect and negative affect. No changes were observed after the control dark chocolate, or any other parameter measured. In conclusion, the findings from this small-scale study indicate lowering of salivary cortisol levels following polyphenol-rich dark chocolate in adults recruited from a health and social care setting. Such changes may be attributable to their ability to inhibit 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity and warrant further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
A Single-Dose of a Polyphenol-Rich Fucus Vesiculosus Extract is Insufficient to Blunt the Elevated Postprandial Blood Glucose Responses Exhibited by Healthy Adults in the Evening: A Randomised Crossover Trial
Antioxidants 2019, 8(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8020049
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 16 February 2019 / Published: 24 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
When healthy adults consume carbohydrates at night, postprandial blood glucose responses are elevated and prolonged compared to daytime.Extended postprandial hyperglycaemia is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols are bioactive secondary metabolites of plants and algae with potential to moderate postprandial glycaemia. [...] Read more.
When healthy adults consume carbohydrates at night, postprandial blood glucose responses are elevated and prolonged compared to daytime.Extended postprandial hyperglycaemia is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols are bioactive secondary metabolites of plants and algae with potential to moderate postprandial glycaemia. This study investigated whether a polyphenol-rich alga (Fucus vesiculosus) extract moderated postprandial glycaemia in the evening in healthy adults. In a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomised three-way crossover trial, 18 participants consumed a polyphenol-rich extract, a cellulose placebo and rice flour placebo (7:15 p.m.) prior to 50 g available carbohydrate from bread (7:45 p.m.), followed by three hours of blood sampling to assess glucose and insulin. A subset of participants (n = 8) completed the same protocol once in the morning with only the cellulose placebo (7:15 a.m.). No effect of the polyphenol-rich extract was observed on postprandial glycaemia in the evening, compared with placebos, in the group as a whole. However, in females only, peak blood glucose concentration was reduced following the polyphenol-rich extract. In the subset analysis, as expected, participants exhibited elevated postprandial blood glucose in the evening compared with the morning following the cellulose placebo. This was the first study to investigate whether a polyphenol intervention moderated evening postprandial hyperglycaemia. The lowering effect observed in females suggests that this warrants further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of the In Vitro Wound-Healing Activity of Calabrian Honeys
Antioxidants 2019, 8(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8020036
Received: 13 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4850 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The healing of skin wounds and particularly chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, is still a clinical emergency. Despite the many therapeutic tools that are available so far, none seems to be really effective and safe. In this context, we highlighted the [...] Read more.
The healing of skin wounds and particularly chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, is still a clinical emergency. Despite the many therapeutic tools that are available so far, none seems to be really effective and safe. In this context, we highlighted the renewed wound healing activity of honey, a viscous aromatic and sweet food, by way of in vitro wound-healing assays, using the HaCaT cell line. Specifically, we investigated five monofloral or multifloral honeys from different Calabrian provinces using them as such or extracted (by Amberlite® or n-hexane and ethyl acetate). The chemical composition of honeys was ascertained by 1H NMR spectroscopy and by the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Amongst the five tested honeys, BL1 and BL5 honeys showed the most promising healing properties. Pinocembrin, which was revealed in BL1 (multifloral) and BL5 (orange) honey samples, is a flavanol that is already known to possess interesting biological activities, including healing. This study aims to investigate how a traditional food such as honey, which is appreciated for its nutritional value and used in folk medicine, can be enhanced as an effective modern remedial to promote a multifaceted and safe healing activity for all skin wounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Popcorn (Zea Mays L. var. Everta) for Antioxidant Capacity and Total Phenolic Content
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010022
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 8 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
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Abstract
Popcorn, one of the most popular snack foods in the world, is known for being a high fiber, healthy food. Our research has found that commercial popcorn also contains significant amounts of the class of antioxidants known as phenolic acids. The total antioxidant [...] Read more.
Popcorn, one of the most popular snack foods in the world, is known for being a high fiber, healthy food. Our research has found that commercial popcorn also contains significant amounts of the class of antioxidants known as phenolic acids. The total antioxidant capacity of raw and popped popcorn extract has been quantified using the Folin–Ciocalteu and FRAP assays. The polyphenols were found exclusively in the pericarp of the kernel completely bound to the oligosaccharide fiber matrix. An in vitro digestion study was also performed to predict the phenolic acids’ bioavailability. On average, nine commercial popcorn samples contain 5.93 ± 0.92 mg/g of total polyphenols after alkaline hydrolysis and 2.66 ± 0.15 mg/g after in vitro digestion as measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu assay. Furthermore, the popping process was found not to significantly decrease the antioxidant capacity. These results indicate that a considerable amount of the bound polyphenols are bioaccessible. Due to the high levels of bioaccessible polyphenols, popcorn may be a significant source of dietary polyphenol antioxidants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols in Contemporary Disease)
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