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Open AccessArticle

Airflow Dynamics over a Beach and Foredune System with Large Woody Debris

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Hakai Institute, P.O. Box 309, Heriot Bay, BC V0P 1H0, Canada
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Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
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School of Geographical Sciences & Urban Planning & School of Earth & Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5302, USA
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Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences, The University of British Columbia|Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2018, 8(5), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8050147
Received: 6 March 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aeolian Processes and Geomorphology)
Airflow dynamics over beach-foredune systems can be complex. Although a great deal is known about the effects of topographic forcing and vegetation cover on wind-field modification, the role of large woody debris (LWD) as a roughness element and modifier of boundary layer flow is relatively understudied. Individual pieces of LWD are non-porous elements that impose bluff body effects and induce secondary flow circulation that varies with size, density, and arrangement. Large assemblages of LWD are common on beaches near forested watersheds and collectively have a degree of porosity that increases aerodynamic roughness in ways that are not fully understood. A field study on a mesotidal sandy beach with a scarped foredune (Calvert Island, British Columbia, Canada) shows that LWD influences flow patterns and turbulence levels. Overall mean and fluctuating energy decline as flow transitions across LWD, while mean energy is converted to turbulent energy. Such flow alterations have implications for sand transport pathways and resulting sedimentation patterns, primarily by inducing deposition within the LWD matrix. View Full-Text
Keywords: aeolian geomorphology; large woody debris; roughness elements; beach-dune morphodynamics; foredune; turbulence; quadrant events; ultrasonic anemometry aeolian geomorphology; large woody debris; roughness elements; beach-dune morphodynamics; foredune; turbulence; quadrant events; ultrasonic anemometry
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Grilliot, M.J.; Walker, I.J.; Bauer, B.O. Airflow Dynamics over a Beach and Foredune System with Large Woody Debris. Geosciences 2018, 8, 147.

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