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Micromachines, Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2011) – 5 articles , Pages 369-442

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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Micrometer- and Nanometer-Scale Polymer Structures by Visible Light Induced Dielectrophoresis (DEP) Force
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 431-442; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040431 - 13 Dec 2011
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4604
Abstract
We report in this paper a novel, inexpensive and flexible method for fabricating micrometer- and nanometer-scale three-dimensional (3D) polymer structures using visible light sources instead of ultra-violet (UV) light sources or lasers. This method also does not require the conventional micro-photolithographic technique ( [...] Read more.
We report in this paper a novel, inexpensive and flexible method for fabricating micrometer- and nanometer-scale three-dimensional (3D) polymer structures using visible light sources instead of ultra-violet (UV) light sources or lasers. This method also does not require the conventional micro-photolithographic technique (i.e., photolithographic masks) for patterning and fabricating polymer structures such as hydrogels. The major materials and methods required for this novel fabrication technology are: (1) any cross-linked network of photoactive polymers (examples of fabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-diacrylate hydrogel structures are shown in this paper); (2) an Optically-induced Dielectrophoresis (ODEP) System which includes an “ODEP chip” (i.e., any chip that changes its surface conductivity when exposed to visible light), an optical microscope, a projector, and a computer; and (3) an animator software hosted on a computer that can generate virtual or dynamic patterns which can be projected onto the “ODEP chip” through the use of a projector and a condenser lens. Essentially, by placing a photosensitive polymer solution inside the microfluidic platform formed by the “ODEP chip” bonded to another substrate, and applying an alternating current (a.c.) electrical potential across the polymer solution (typically ~20 Vp-p at 10 kHz), solid polymer micro/nano structures can then be formed on the “ODEP chip” surface when visible-light is projected onto the chip. The 2D lateral geometry (x and y dimensions) and the thickness (height) of the micro/nano structures are dictated by the image geometry of the visible light projected onto the “ODEP chip” and also the time duration of projection. Typically, after an image projection with intensity ranging from ~0.2 to 0.4 mW/cm2 for 10 s, ~200 nm high structures can be formed. In our current system, the thickness of these polymer structures can be controlled to form from ~200 nanometers to ~3 micrometers structures. However, in the in-plane dimensions, only ~7 μm resolution can be achieved now, due to the optical diffraction limit and the physical dimensions of DMD mirrors in the projector. Nevertheless, with higher quality optical components, the in-plane resolution is expected to be sub-micron. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer MEMS)
Open AccessArticle
Development of a Microelectromechanical System (MEMS)-Based Multisensor Platform for Environmental Monitoring
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 410-430; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040410 - 03 Nov 2011
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4978
Abstract
Recent progress in data processing, communications and electronics miniaturization is now enabling the development of low-cost wireless sensor networks (WSN), which consist of spatially distributed autonomous sensor modules that collaborate to monitor real-time environmental conditions unobtrusively and with appropriate levels of spatial and [...] Read more.
Recent progress in data processing, communications and electronics miniaturization is now enabling the development of low-cost wireless sensor networks (WSN), which consist of spatially distributed autonomous sensor modules that collaborate to monitor real-time environmental conditions unobtrusively and with appropriate levels of spatial and temporal granularity. Recent and future applications of this technology range from preventative maintenance and quality control to environmental modelling and failure analysis. In order to fabricate these low-cost, low-power reliable monitoring platforms, it is necessary to improve the level of sensor integration available today. This paper outlines the microfabrication and characterization results of a multifunctional multisensor unit. An existing fabrication process for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor CMOS-compatible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) structures has been modified and extended to manufacture temperature, relative humidity, corrosion, gas thermal conductivity, and gas flow velocity sensors on a single silicon substrate. A dedicated signal conditioning circuit layer has been built around this MEMS multisensor die for integration on an existing low-power WSN module. The final unit enables accurate readings and cross-sensitivity compensation thanks to a combination of simultaneous readings from multiple sensors. Real-time communication to the outside world is ensured via radio-frequency protocols, and data collection in a serial memory is also made possible for diagnostics applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Usage Monitoring Microsystems (HUMMs))
Open AccessArticle
All Titanium Microelectrode Array for Field Potential Measurements from Neurons and Cardiomyocytes—A Feasibility Study
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 394-409; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040394 - 28 Oct 2011
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4681
Abstract
In this paper, we describe our all-titanium microelectrode array (tMEA) fabrication process and show that uncoated titanium microelectrodes are fully applicable to measuring field potentials (FPs) from neurons and cardiomyocytes. Many novel research questions require custom designed microelectrode configurations different from the few [...] Read more.
In this paper, we describe our all-titanium microelectrode array (tMEA) fabrication process and show that uncoated titanium microelectrodes are fully applicable to measuring field potentials (FPs) from neurons and cardiomyocytes. Many novel research questions require custom designed microelectrode configurations different from the few commercially available ones. As several different configurations may be needed especially in a prototyping phase, considerable time and cost savings in MEA fabrication can be achieved by omitting the additional low impedance microelectrode coating, usually made of titanium nitride (TiN) or platinum black, and have a simplified and easily processable MEA structure instead. Noise, impedance, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization were performed to our uncoated titanium microelectrodes and commercial TiN coated microelectrodes and were supplemented by FP measurements from neurons and cardiomyocytes on both platforms. Despite the increased noise levels compared to commercial MEAs our tMEAs produced good FP measurements from neurons and cardiomyocytes. Thus, tMEAs offer a cost effective platform to develop custom designed electrode configurations and more complex monitoring environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Microdevices)
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Open AccessArticle
Modeling of the Response Time of Thermal Flow Sensors
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 385-393; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040385 - 21 Oct 2011
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3656
Abstract
This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model [...] Read more.
This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model uses the finite-difference method to solve the heat transfer equations, taking into consideration the transient conduction and convection between the sensor membrane and the surrounding fluid. Program results agree with experimental measurements and explain the response time dependence on the velocity and the sensor geometry. Values of the response time vary from about 5 ms in the case of stagnant flow to 1.5 ms for a flow velocity of 44 m/s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modeling, Testing and Reliability Issues in MEMS Engineering 2011)
Open AccessArticle
Nonlinear Dual-Phase Multiplexing in Digital Microfluidic Architectures
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 369-384; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040369 - 28 Sep 2011
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4193
Abstract
A 16 × 16 digital microfluidic multiplexer is demonstrated. The device makes use of dual-phase AC activation in a bi-layered electrode structure for actuating microdrops independently. A switching arrangement is employed to localize two out-of-phase AC waveforms in one overlapped region of the [...] Read more.
A 16 × 16 digital microfluidic multiplexer is demonstrated. The device makes use of dual-phase AC activation in a bi-layered electrode structure for actuating microdrops independently. A switching arrangement is employed to localize two out-of-phase AC waveforms in one overlapped region of the two-dimensional multiplexer grid. The superimposed AC waveforms overcome the threshold voltage for motion of a local microdrop. The demonstrated dual-phase activation and nonlinear threshold-based motion overcomes the previously-reported microdrop interference effect, as it successfully actuates individual microdrops in systems with multiple neighbouring microdrops. The device is demonstrated with an integrated centre-tap transformer using a 10.0 Vrms input voltage and minimal power consumption. Full article
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