Next Article in Journal
Major Determinants of Airway Epithelial Cell Sensitivity to S. aureus Alpha-Toxin: Disposal of Toxin Heptamers by Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Lysosomal Degradation
Previous Article in Journal
Mycotoxin Occurrence, Toxicity, and Detoxifying Agents in Pig Production with an Emphasis on Deoxynivalenol
Previous Article in Special Issue
Pre-Harvest Modelling and Mitigation of Aflatoxins in Maize in a Changing Climatic Environment—A Review
Open AccessArticle

Natural Occurrence of Mycotoxin-Producing Fusaria in Market-Bought Peruvian Cereals: A Food Safety Threat for Andean Populations

1
INRAE, MycSA, F-33882 Villenave d’Ornon, France
2
Université de Toulouse, IRD, UPS, UMR 152 PHARMADEV, 31000 Toulouse, France
3
Unité Organisation Nucléaire et Oncogenèse, Institut Pasteur, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Sorbonne Universités, 75015 Paris, France
4
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas, Departamento de Patología, Lima 15038, Peru
5
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas, Departamento de Cirugía en Abdomen, Lima 15038, Peru
6
Institut Pasteur, Unité Organisation Nucléaire et Oncogenèse, INSERM, U 993, 75015 Paris, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2021, 13(2), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13020172
Received: 27 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 20 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mycotoxins in Food: Origin and Management of Risk)
Consumption of cereals contaminated by mycotoxins poses health risks. For instance, Fumonisins B, mainly produced by Fusarium verticillioides and Fusariumproliferatum, and the type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol, typically produced by Fusarium graminearum, are highly prevalent on cereal grains that are staples of many cultural diets and known to represent a toxic risk hazard. In Peru, corn and other cereals are frequently consumed on a daily basis under various forms, the majority of food grains being sold through traditional markets for direct consumption. Here, we surveyed mycotoxin contents of market-bought grain samples in order to assess the threat these mycotoxins might represent to Peruvian population, with a focus on corn. We found that nearly one sample of Peruvian corn out of six was contaminated with very high levels of Fumonisins, levels mostly ascribed to the presence of F. verticillioides. Extensive profiling of Peruvian corn kernels for fungal contaminants could provide elements to refine the potential risk associated with Fusarium toxins and help define adapted food safety standards. View Full-Text
Keywords: Fumonisins B; Peru; corn Fumonisins B; Peru; corn
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ducos, C.; Pinson-Gadais, L.; Chereau, S.; Richard-Forget, F.; Vásquez-Ocmín, P.; Cerapio, J.P.; Casavilca-Zambrano, S.; Ruiz, E.; Pineau, P.; Bertani, S.; Ponts, N. Natural Occurrence of Mycotoxin-Producing Fusaria in Market-Bought Peruvian Cereals: A Food Safety Threat for Andean Populations. Toxins 2021, 13, 172. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13020172

AMA Style

Ducos C, Pinson-Gadais L, Chereau S, Richard-Forget F, Vásquez-Ocmín P, Cerapio JP, Casavilca-Zambrano S, Ruiz E, Pineau P, Bertani S, Ponts N. Natural Occurrence of Mycotoxin-Producing Fusaria in Market-Bought Peruvian Cereals: A Food Safety Threat for Andean Populations. Toxins. 2021; 13(2):172. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13020172

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ducos, Christine; Pinson-Gadais, Laetitia; Chereau, Sylvain; Richard-Forget, Florence; Vásquez-Ocmín, Pedro; Cerapio, Juan P.; Casavilca-Zambrano, Sandro; Ruiz, Eloy; Pineau, Pascal; Bertani, Stéphane; Ponts, Nadia. 2021. "Natural Occurrence of Mycotoxin-Producing Fusaria in Market-Bought Peruvian Cereals: A Food Safety Threat for Andean Populations" Toxins 13, no. 2: 172. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13020172

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop