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Open AccessArticle

Do Overweight Adolescents Adhere to Dietary Intervention Messages? Twelve-Month Detailed Dietary Outcomes from Curtin University’s Activity, Food and Attitudes Program

by Kyla L. Smith 1,*,†, Deborah A. Kerr 1,†, Erin K. Howie 2,† and Leon M. Straker 2,†
1
School of Public Health, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia
2
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 4363-4382; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7064363
Received: 17 April 2015 / Revised: 20 May 2015 / Accepted: 21 May 2015 / Published: 2 June 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of Nutrient Intakes)
Dietary components of adolescent obesity interventions are rarely evaluated with comprehensive reporting of dietary change. The objective was to assess dietary change in overweight adolescents, including adherence to dietary intervention. The dietary intervention was part of a multi-component intervention (CAFAP) targeting the physical activity, sedentary and healthy eating behaviors of overweight adolescents (n = 69). CAFAP was a staggered entry, within-subject, waitlist controlled clinical trial with 12 months of follow up. Diet was assessed using three-day food records and a brief eating behavior questionnaire. Changes in dietary outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, adjusted for underreporting. Food record data suggested reduced adherence to dietary intervention messages over time following the intervention, despite conflicting information from the brief eating behavior questionnaire. During the intervention, energy intake was stable but favorable nutrient changes occurred. During the 12 month maintenance period; self-reported eating behaviors improved, energy intake remained stable but dietary fat and saturated fat intake gradually returned to baseline levels. Discrepancies between outcomes from brief dietary assessment methods and three-day food records show differences between perceived and actual intake, highlighting the need for detailed dietary reporting. Further, adherence to dietary intervention principles reduces over time, indicating a need for better maintenance support. View Full-Text
Keywords: overweight; obese; adolescent; dietary intervention; adherence; dietary intake; dietary assessment; dietary patterns overweight; obese; adolescent; dietary intervention; adherence; dietary intake; dietary assessment; dietary patterns
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Smith, K.L.; Kerr, D.A.; Howie, E.K.; Straker, L.M. Do Overweight Adolescents Adhere to Dietary Intervention Messages? Twelve-Month Detailed Dietary Outcomes from Curtin University’s Activity, Food and Attitudes Program. Nutrients 2015, 7, 4363-4382.

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