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Open AccessArticle

The Role of CT-Quantified Body Composition on Longitudinal Health-Related Quality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Patients: The Colocare Study

1
Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
2
Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
3
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
4
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
5
Population Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
6
Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
7
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
8
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine and Siteman Cancer Center, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
9
Department of Medicine, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
10
Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
11
Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
12
Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
13
Cancer Epidemiology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
14
Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1247; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051247
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 16 April 2020 / Accepted: 24 April 2020 / Published: 28 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Metabolic Status, and Body Composition)
Background: Obesity, defined by body mass index (BMI), measured at colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis has been associated with postoperative complications and survival outcomes. However, BMI does not allow for a differentiation between fat and muscle mass. Computed tomography (CT)-defined body composition more accurately reflects different types of tissue and their associations with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the first year of disease, but this has not been investigated yet. We studied the role of visceral and subcutaneous fat area (VFA and SFA) and skeletal muscle mass (SMM) on longitudinally assessed HRQoL in CRC patients. Methods: A total of 138 newly diagnosed CRC patients underwent CT scans at diagnosis and completed questionnaires prior to and six and twelve months post-surgery. We investigated the associations of VFA, SFA, and SMM with HRQoL at multiple time points. Results: A higher VFA was associated with increased pain six and twelve months post-surgery (β = 0.06, p = 0.04 and β = 0.07, p = 0.01) and with worse social functioning six months post-surgery (β = −0.08, p = 0.01). Higher SMM was associated with increased pain twelve months post-surgery (β = 1.03, p < 0.01). Conclusions: CT-quantified body composition is associated with HRQoL scales post-surgery. Intervention strategies targeting a reduction in VFA and maintaining SMM might improve HRQoL in CRC patients during the first year post-surgery. View Full-Text
Keywords: visceral fat area; subcutaneous fat area; skeletal muscle mass; CT-quantified body composition; health-related quality of life; colorectal cancer; prospective data visceral fat area; subcutaneous fat area; skeletal muscle mass; CT-quantified body composition; health-related quality of life; colorectal cancer; prospective data
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Gigic, B.; Nattenmüller, J.; Schneider, M.; Kulu, Y.; Syrjala, K.L.; Böhm, J.; Schrotz-King, P.; Brenner, H.; Colditz, G.A.; Figueiredo, J.C.; Grady, W.M.; Li, C.I.; Shibata, D.; Siegel, E.M.; Toriola, A.T.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Ulrich, A.; Ulrich, C.M. The Role of CT-Quantified Body Composition on Longitudinal Health-Related Quality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Patients: The Colocare Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1247.

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