Next Article in Journal
Relationships between Obesity, Nutrient Supply and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in Koreans
Previous Article in Journal
Effectiveness of Nutrition Interventions in Vending Machines to Encourage the Purchase and Consumption of Healthier Food and Drinks in the University Setting: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Perceptions of ‘Home Cooking’: A Qualitative Analysis from the United Kingdom and United States
Open AccessArticle

Food Agency in the United States: Associations with Cooking Behavior and Dietary Intake

1
Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
4
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA
5
Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
6
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 877; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030877
Received: 5 March 2020 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 March 2020 / Published: 24 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preparation Behaviours, Diet and Health)
“Food agency” is one’s ability to procure and prepare food within the contexts of one’s social, physical, and economic environment. In 2018, we used Amazon TurkPrime to field two large national surveys in the United States (US) to examine food agency and several food- and cooking-related factors. The first survey (n = 1,457) was fielded in a national sample of US adults. The second survey (n = 1,399) comprised of parents of 2–9-year-old children. Analyses included hierarchical linear regression to examine factors that explained variation in food agency and used Poisson and generalized linear models to examine the association between food agency and between cooking behavior and dietary intake, respectively. Cooking skills; food skills; and cooking confidence, attitudes, and perceptions explained a high degree of food agency variance. Higher food agency was associated with more frequent cooking of all meals, more frequent scratch cooking, and less frequent cooking with packaged ingredients among both adults and parents. Higher food agency was also associated with higher consumption of vegetables among both adults and children. Food agency encompasses a number of the interrelated factors important for home cooking and is a useful construct for understanding and promoting home cooking behavior. View Full-Text
Keywords: food agency; cooking; dietary intake; diet quality; survey; cooking skills; food skills food agency; cooking; dietary intake; diet quality; survey; cooking skills; food skills
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wolfson, J.A.; Lahne, J.; Raj, M.; Insolera, N.; Lavelle, F.; Dean, M. Food Agency in the United States: Associations with Cooking Behavior and Dietary Intake. Nutrients 2020, 12, 877.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop