Special Issue "Food Preparation Behaviours, Diet and Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Moira Dean
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Queens Univ Belfast, Inst Global Food Secur, Sch Biol Sci, Belfast BT9 5AG, Antrim, North Ireland
Interests: food; attitudes; perceptions; behaviours
Dr. Michelle Spence
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Queens Univ Belfast, Sch Biol Sci, Inst Global Food Secur, Belfast BT9 5AG, Antrim, North Ireland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food preparation behaviours which encompass the application of cooking and food skills have been associated with numerous health benefits, including a greater diet quality, weight control and even longevity of life. Cooking interventions have been identified and promoted as key strategies in obesity prevention recommendations. However, recent reviews highlight the predominance of poorly designed studies in both adult- and child-focused research, stressing the need for high-quality exploration in this area. As a growing research area, the link between food preparation behaviours and health measured on a variety of outcomes needs further comprehensive investigation.

Therefore, in this Special Issue we welcome original research and literature reviews in relation to food and meal preparation and its association with diet, health and wellbeing.  Both qualitative and quantitative methodologies will be considered. Here food preparation behaviours could include food skills such as shopping, storage and planning as well as cooking.

Prof. Moira Dean
Dr. Michelle Spence
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meal preparation
  • cooking
  • health
  • food

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Perceptions of ‘Home Cooking’: A Qualitative Analysis from the United Kingdom and United States
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010198 - 12 Jan 2020
Abstract
Cooking at home is likely to be associated with benefits to diet and health. However, the nuanced perceptions and practices linked to different types of cooking are not yet fully understood. This research aimed to explore the specific concept of ‘home cooking’, using [...] Read more.
Cooking at home is likely to be associated with benefits to diet and health. However, the nuanced perceptions and practices linked to different types of cooking are not yet fully understood. This research aimed to explore the specific concept of ‘home cooking’, using qualitative research from the UK and US. Data from two previously completed studies exploring cooking at home were combined and a new secondary analysis was undertaken using the Framework Method. Data in the first study were drawn from participants in the North East of the UK who were interviewed. Data in the second study were drawn from participants in Baltimore, US, who took part in focus groups. Data from a total of 71 adults (18 UK and 53 US), with diverse sociodemographic characteristics and experiences of cooking, were analysed. In both countries, participants distinguished ‘home cooking’ as a distinct subtype of cooking at home. ‘Home cooking’ was defined in terms of preparing a meal from scratch, cooking with love and care, and nostalgia. Cooking at home had a range of dimensions, and perceptions of ‘home cooking’ tended to focus on social and emotional associations. In future, public health initiatives might, therefore, highlight the potential social and emotional benefits of ‘home cooking’, rather than emphasising implications for physical health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preparation Behaviours, Diet and Health)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Dr. Susanna Mills
Aff: University of Michigan
Topic: Home cooking: good for the soul, bad for the waistline? A qualitative analysis from the United Kingdom and United States

2. Dr. Tony Benson
Aff: Queen’s University Belfast
Topic: Application of the Health Belief Model to cooking for health

3. Dr. Dawn Surgenor
Aff: Ulster University
Topic: Use of Video to Maximise Cooking Skills Development: A Latent Class Analysis to Explore Learning Groups
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