Next Article in Journal
Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus paracasei on the Peripheral Immune Response in Children with Celiac Disease Autoimmunity: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial
Next Article in Special Issue
Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prevalence of Coeliac Disease in Women with Infertility
Previous Article in Journal
Influence of Water Intake and Balance on Body Composition in Healthy Young Adults from Spain
Previous Article in Special Issue
Food Neophobia in Celiac Disease and Other Gluten-Free Diet Individuals
Open AccessCommunication

Accidental Gluten Contamination in Traditional Lunch Meals from Food Services in Brasilia, Brazil

1
Faculty of Nutrition, Federal University of Goiás (UFG), Campus Colemar Natal e Silva, Rua 227 qd.68 s/n, Setor Leste Universitário, Goiânia 74605-080, Brazil
2
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia 70910-900, Brazil
3
Faculty of Medicine, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia 70910-900, Brazil
4
Department of Statistics, Central Institute of Sciences, University of Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Asa Norte, Brasilia 70910-900, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1924; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081924
Received: 4 July 2019 / Revised: 13 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 16 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Diet and Celiac Disease)
This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of gluten contamination in naturally gluten-free meals from food services in the Federal District, Brazil. This is an exploratory cross-sectional quantitative study in which a total of 180 samples of naturally gluten-free dishes were collected from 60 food services in Brazil. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for the quantification of gluten. As established by the Codex Alimentarius, the threshold of 20 ppm of gluten was considered as the accepted upper gluten level for gluten-free food. A total of 2.8% (95% CI: 0.3–5.2%) gluten contamination was found in the samples. Among the 60 food services, 6.7% (95% CI: 2.7–10.6%) displayed at least one contaminated food in our sample. The occurrence of gluten contamination in naturally gluten-free preparations was uncommon and low on a quantitative basis. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; gluten; gluten-free; contamination; food contamination; foodservice celiac disease; gluten; gluten-free; contamination; food contamination; foodservice
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Farage, P.; Zandonadi, R.P.; Gandolfi, L.; Pratesi, R.; Falcomer, A.L.; Araújo, L.S.; Nakano, E.Y.; Ginani, V.C. Accidental Gluten Contamination in Traditional Lunch Meals from Food Services in Brasilia, Brazil. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1924.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop