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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1189; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091189

Efficacy of an Oral Rehydration Solution Enriched with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Zinc in the Management of Acute Diarrhoea in Infants: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, First Department of Pediatrics, University of Athens Children’s Hospital “Agia Sofia”, Thivon and Papadiamantopoulou, 11527 Athens, Greece
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Received: 5 August 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics in Pediatrics)
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Abstract

The efficacy of oral rehydration solution (ORS) enriched with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and zinc in infants with acute gastroenteritis, is poorly defined. The aim of this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, was to assess the efficacy of an ORS enriched with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and zinc (ORS+Lr&Z) in well-nourished, non-hospitalized infants with acute diarrhoea. Fifty one infants with acute diarrhoea were randomly assigned to receive either ORS+Lr&Z (28 infants, mean ± SD age 1.7 ± 0.7 years, 21 males), or standard ORS (ORSLr&Z; 23 infants, mean ± SD age 1.8 ± 0.7 years, 16 males). Stools volume and consistency were recorded pre- and posttreatment using the Amsterdam Infant Stool Scale and were compared between the two groups, as well as lost work/day care days, drug administration and need for hospitalization. Both groups showed reduction in the severity of diarrhoea on day two (p < 0.001) while, all outcomes showed a trend to be better in the ORS+Lr&Z group, without reaching statistical significance, probably due to the relatively small number of patients. No adverse effects were recorded. In conclusion, both ORS were effective in managing acute diarrhoea in well-nourished, non-hospitalized infants. ORS enriched with L. reuteri DSM 17938 and zinc was well tolerated with no adverse effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: acute gastroenteritis; children; Lactobacillus reuteri; oral rehydration solution; probiotics; zinc acute gastroenteritis; children; Lactobacillus reuteri; oral rehydration solution; probiotics; zinc
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Maragkoudaki, M.; Chouliaras, G.; Moutafi, A.; Thomas, A.; Orfanakou, A.; Papadopoulou, A. Efficacy of an Oral Rehydration Solution Enriched with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Zinc in the Management of Acute Diarrhoea in Infants: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1189.

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